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The HierophantThe Hierophant

A hierophant is a person who invites participants in a sacred exercise into the presence of that which is deemed holy. The title, hierophant, originated in Ancient Greece and combines the words φαίνω (phainein, "to show") and ‏τα ειρα (ta hiera, "the holy"); hierophants served as interpreters of sacred mysteries and arcane principles. For the Open Siddur Project, the Hierophant welcomes new contributors and explains our mission: ensuring creatively inspired work intended for communal use is shared freely for creative reuse and redistribution.

חנוכה | Midrash Ma’aseh Ḥanukah

Winter Selections

  • שמוש תהלים | Shimush Tehillim: On the Theurgical Use of Psalms

    שמוש תהלים | Shimush Tehillim: On the Theurgical Use of Psalms

    The Shimmush Tehillim is a medieval work providing prescriptive theurgical associations for Psalms and verses from Psalms. It has been historically attributed to Rav Hai Gaon (939-1038 CE) but any definitive statement of authorship is lacking. The suggestion that portions of the Shimush Tehillim were authored during the late Geonic period in Iraq isn't implausible. We also know that Hai Gaon was knowledgeable of Hekhalot writings that should at least be considered part of the same thought world as the Shimmush Tehillim. Writings found in the Shimush Tehillim have been found in manuscripts dating from the 12th century. This digital transcription of Shimush Tehillim derives from Elias Klein Békéscsaba's 1936 compilation. This edition should not be considered a critical text, as earlier editions certainly exist. Not all of the Psalms are identified as having a particular theurgical use. . . .Continue Reading. . . ☞
  • ט״וּ בִּשְׁבָט | A Tu BiShvat Seder to Heal the Wounded Earth by Rabbi Arthur Waskow (The Shalom Center)

    ט״וּ בִּשְׁבָט | A Tu BiShvat Seder to Heal the Wounded Earth by Rabbi Arthur Waskow (The Shalom Center)

    This Tu BiShvat haggadah focuses on healing the wounded Earth today, with passages on major policy questions facing the human race in the midst of a great climate crisis and massive extinctions of species. In each of the Four Worlds in this Haggadah (Earth, Water, Air, Fire) there are traditional, mystical, and poetical passages, and in each there are also contemporary passages on aspects of public policy (Earth: food and forest; Water: fracking; Air: climate; Fire: alternative and renewable energy sources.) These policy-oriented passages help make this a distinctive Haggadah. After these passages, this Haggadah encourages Seder participants to take time for discussion. They may also decide to omit some passages and/or add others. The desire for such a Haggadah grew from discussions of the Green Hevra, a network of Jewish environmental organizations. Thanks to Judith Belasco, Rabbi Mordechai Liebling, Sybil Sanchez, Rabbi David Seidenberg, Richard Schwartz, Rabbi David Shneyer, and Yoni Stadlin for comments on an earlier draft of this Haggadah. . . .Continue Reading. . . ☞
  • ט״וּ בִּשְׁבָט | A Prayer for the Tu Bishvat Seder from Pri Etz Hadar adapted by Rabbi David Seidenberg (neohasid.org)

    ט״וּ בִּשְׁבָט | A Prayer for the Tu Bishvat Seder from Pri Etz Hadar adapted by Rabbi David Seidenberg (neohasid.org)

    This prayer for Tu Bish'vat, derived from the prayer included with the seder for Tu Bish'vat, the Pri Etz Hadar, are based on the Kabbalah of the four worlds and the ancient idea that everything physical is an image of the spiritual. . . .Continue Reading. . . ☞
  • יוֺם פַּיִי | On the Rabbinical Approximation of Pi by Boaz Tsaban and David Gardner

    יוֺם פַּיִי | On the Rabbinical Approximation of Pi by Boaz Tsaban and David Gardner

    It is interesting to check whether more precise values were known to the ancient Hebrews. The answer to this may be found in the Hebrew Bible. There is a Rabbinical tradition on the reading-versus-writing disparity in I Kings 7:23. According to Hebrew scriptural tradition, the word meaning 'line' is written as קוה, but read as קו. . . .Continue Reading. . . ☞
  • על הניסים | Al Hanissim thanksgiving addition for all Secular/National Days of Gratitude by Aharon Varady

    על הניסים | Al Hanissim thanksgiving addition for all Secular/National Days of Gratitude by Aharon Varady

    Opportunities to express gratitude on secular, nationalist days of thanksgiving demand acknowledgement of an almost unfathomably deep history of trauma -- not only the suffering and striving of my immigrant ancestors, but the sacrifice of all those who endured suffering dealt by their struggle to survive, and often failure to survive, the oppressions dealt by colonization, conquest, hegemony, natural disaster. Only the Earth (from which we, earthlings were born, Bnei Adam from Adamah) has witnessed the constancy of the violent deprivations we inflict upon each other. The privilege I've inherited from these sacrifices has come at a cost, and it must be honestly acknowledged, especially on secular/national days of thanksgiving, independence, and freedom. I insert this prayer after Al Hanissim in the Amidah and in the Birkat Hamazon on national days of independence and thanksgiving. . . .Continue Reading. . . ☞
  • תהילים כט | Psalms 29, an interpretive translation by Avi Dolgin

    תהילים כט | Psalms 29, an interpretive translation by Avi Dolgin

    Avi Dolgin's translation of תהילים כט (Psalm 29) interweaves between the original Hebrew (הָב֣וּ לַֽ֭יהוָה בְּנֵ֣י אֵלִ֑ים | havu l’YHVH b’nei eilim) and an English language interpretation. The interpretation, while faithful to the original, leans heavily on environmental concerns, especially as seen from a North American West Coast perspective. . . .Continue Reading. . . ☞
  • ט״וּ בִּשְׁבָט | The Pri Etz Hadar: Fruit of the Majestic Tree seder for Tu biShvat by Rabbi Natan Binyamin Ghazzati (ca. 17th c.) translated by Reb Miles Krassen

    ט״וּ בִּשְׁבָט | The Pri Etz Hadar: Fruit of the Majestic Tree seder for Tu biShvat by Rabbi Natan Binyamin Ghazzati (ca. 17th c.) translated by Reb Miles Krassen

    From the Pri Etz Hadar, the first ever published seder for Tu Bishvat, circa 17th century: "speech has the power to arouse the sefirot and to cause them to shine more wondrously with a very great light that sheds abundance, favor, blessing, and benefit throughout all the worlds. Consequently, before eating each fruit, it is proper to meditate on the mystery of its divine root, as found in the Zohar and, in some cases, in the tikkunim, in order to arouse their roots above." . . .Continue Reading. . . ☞
  • שלום | Peas on Earth (from the Teva educators Fall 2010)

    "Peas on Earth (everybody now) / Peas on Earth -- you've got to / Grab a fork and lettuce work / For Peas on Earth." Lyrics and video of several of the 2010 Teva educators singing "Peas on Earth" in costume. . . .Continue Reading. . . ☞
  • Tefillat yaḥid: a prayer for when praying by oneself by David Zvi Kalman

    God and God of my forefathers and foremothers, as I stand here in an innermost room and pray, so too should you in an innermost room heed my questions, my praises and my requests, both from the utterances of my mouth and the utterances of my heart. Even if I am silent, you will know that my tefilla is directed towards you, who is One and whose name is One, alone in all the worlds. My heart is awake and my voice knocks. Open for me, my Lord, my Perfect One, the gates of Tefilla. . . .Continue Reading. . . ☞
  • Prayer for the State of Israel by Rabbi Arik Ascherman

    Prayer for the State of Israel by Rabbi Arik Ascherman

    Sovereign of the Universe, accept in lovingkindness and with favor our prayers for the State of Israel, her government and all who dwell within her boundries and under her authority. Reopen our eyes and our hearts to the wonder of Israel and strengthen our faith in Your power to work redemption in every human soul. Grant us also the fortitude to keep ever before us those ideals to which Israel dedicated herself in her Declaration of Independence, so that we may be true partners with the people of Israel in working toward her as yet not fully fulfilled vision. . . .Continue Reading. . . ☞
  • A Prayer for the Earth by Rabbi David Seidenberg (neohasid.org)

    A Prayer for the Earth by Rabbi David Seidenberg (neohasid.org)

    God of all spirit, all directions, all winds You have placed in our hands power unlike any since the world began to overturn the orders of creation. . . .Continue Reading. . . ☞
  • The Rainbow Haftarah by Rabbi Arthur Waskow, translated by Rabbi Zalman Schachter-Shalomi

    The Rainbow Haftarah by Rabbi Arthur Waskow, translated by Rabbi Zalman Schachter-Shalomi

    I call you to make from fire not an all-consuming blaze But the light in which all beings see each other fully. All different, All bearing One Spark. I call you to light a flame to see more clearly That the earth and all who live as part of it Are not for burning: A flame to see The rainbow in the many-colored faces of all life. . . .Continue Reading. . . ☞
  • A Prayer for the Government by Louis Ginzberg (1927)

    A Prayer for the Government by Louis Ginzberg (1927)

    Our God and God of our ancestors: Accept with mercy our prayer for our land and its government. Pour out your blessing on this land, on its President, judges, officers and officials, who work faithfully for the public good. Teach them from the laws of Your Torah, enlighten them with the rules of Your justice, so that peace, tranquility, happiness and freedom will never depart from our land. God of all that lives, please bestow Your spirit on all the inhabitants of our land, and plant love, fellowship, peace and friendship between the different communities and faiths that dwell here. Uproot from their hearts all hate, animosity, jealousy and strife, in order to fulfill the longings of its people, who aspire for its dignity, and desire to see it as a light for all nations. . . .Continue Reading. . . ☞
  • ט״וּ בִּשְׁבָט | The Fruit of the Tree of Knowledge on the Tu biSh’vat Seder Plate by Rabbi Dalia Marx

    Through eating those fruits that our sages of blessed memory identified as the fruit of the tree of knowledge, we recall the best of creation, in its beauty and completeness. We remember that every human being, by virtue of being a human being, is the pinnacle of creation. Our task as caretakers is to preserve the world, to work it, and to repair it. Our task is to make the State of Israel more just, so that she will be a blessing to all of her inhabitants and those who love her. . . .Continue Reading. . . ☞
  • הושׁענות | Hoshanot by Rabbi Zalman Schachter-Shalomi, translation by Gabbai Seth Fishman

    הושׁענות | Hoshanot by Rabbi Zalman Schachter-Shalomi, translation by Gabbai Seth Fishman

    A supplemental Hoshanot liturgy for Sukkot confessing a selection of humanity's crimes against creation. . . .Continue Reading. . . ☞

Miscellaneous Liturgy & Related Work in the Open Siddur Archive

  • Reconstruction of a liturgy for the Amidah in Greek from Jewish prayers preserved in the Constitutiones Apostolorum (circa 380 CE) by Dr. David Fiensy

    Reconstruction of a liturgy for the Amidah in Greek from Jewish prayers preserved in the Constitutiones Apostolorum (circa 380 CE) by Dr. David Fiensy

    This is a reconstruction of a sabbath liturgy for the Tefillah of the Amidah, at least in some variant of its public recitation, in Greek and preserved in an early Christian work, the Constitutiones Apostolorum (Apostolic Constitutions), a Christian work compiled around 380 CE in Syria. Several prayers derived from Jewish sources appear in the Apostolic Constitutions and they can be found grouped together and labeled "Greek" or "Hellenistic Syanagogal Works" in collections of apocrypha and pseudepigrapha. Because explicitly Christian references appeared to be added onto a pre-existing text with familiar Jewish or "Old Testament" themes and references, scholars in the late 19th century were already suggesting that as many as 16 of the prayers in the Apostolic Constitutions books 7 and 8 were derived from Jewish prayers. A more modern appraisal was made by Dr. Fiensy and published in Prayers Alleged to Be Jewish (Scholars Press 1985). Based on a careful analysis of the prayers, he concludes that the only prayers which can be identified as Jewish with certainty are those found in sections 33-38 of book 7. . . .Continue Reading. . . ☞
  • תפילת בת המצווה | Prayer for a Bat Mitzvah after she finishes reading from the Torah

    תפילת בת המצווה | Prayer for a Bat Mitzvah after she finishes reading from the Torah

    הִנְנִי עוֹמֶדֶת בְּמָקוֹם זֶה הַיּוֹם כְּדֵי לְהָעִיד וְלוֹמַר בְּקוֹל צָלוּל וּבָרוּר שֶׁאֲנִי בַּת יִשְׂרָאֵל. עָלִיתִי לַתּוֹרָה כְּדֵי לְהִתְחַבֵּר לְדוֹרוֹת שֶׁל בָּנוֹת וּבָנִים, אִמָּהוֹת וְאָבוֹת, סַבְתוֹת וְסָבִים, אֲשֶׁר קָרְאוּ בְּסֵפֶר זֶה, פֵּרְשׁוּ אֶת מִלּוֹתָיו וְרָאוּ בּוֹ עַמּוּד אֵשׁ הַמֵּאִיר אֶת דַּרְכָּם מֵהֶעָבָר אַל הַהֹוֶה וּמֵהַהֹוֶה לְעָתִיד. קְרִיאָתִי בְּסֵפֶר מְחַזֶּקֶת אֶת הַקֶּשֶׁר בֵּינִי לְבֵין מִשְׁפַּחְתִּי, בֵּינִי לְבֵין חֲבֵרִי וַחֲבֵרוֹתַי, בֵּינִי לְבֵין עַמִּי וְאַרְצִי. מְקַבֶּלֶת אֲנִי בְּאַהֲבָה אֶת הִשְׁתַּיְכוּתִי לְמָסֹרֶת שֶׁל תּוֹרָה עַתִּיקַת יוֹמִין בָּהּ יֵשׁ לַהֲגוֹת יוֹמָם וָלַיְלָה. אֲנִי תְּקַוֶּה שֶׁאוּכַל לַהֲפֹךְ בָּהּ וְלַהֲפֹךְ בָּהּ, לְהַתְווֹת לְעַצְמִי דַּרְכֵי חַיִּים בְּאֶמְצָעוּתָהּ, לְחַפֵּשׂ בָּהּ נְתִיבוֹת לְחָכְמָה וּלְאַהֲבָה וּלְהִשְׁתַּמֵּשׁ בָּהּ לְטוֹבַת הַכְּלָל. מִי יִתֵּן וּשְׂפָתָהּ שֶׁל הַתּוֹרָה שֶׁמְּחַבֶּרֶת בֵּין עָבַר לֶעָתִיד, וְאוֹתִיּוֹתֶיהָ שֶׁחֲרוּתוֹת בְּדִמְיוֹנִי פְּנִימָה וּבְפִי הַחוּצָה, תְּשַׁמֵּשְׁנָה אוֹתִי בְּשָׁכְבִי וּבְקוּמִי, בְּבֵיתִי וּבְלֶכְתִי, בִּצְעִירוּתִי וּבְזִקְנָתִי. כִּי דְּרָכֶיהָ דְּרָכַי נֹעַם וּנְתִיבוֹתֶיהָ שָׁלוֹם. אמן. . . .Continue Reading. . . ☞
  • Motzi — a kavanah before eating challah

    Motzi — a kavanah before eating challah

    Trisha Arlin shares "Motzi", a kavanah (intention) for the blessing, Hamotzi Lehem Min Ha'aretz, over challah. Describing the kavanah she writes that it's, "based on Rabbi Ellen Lippmann’s tradition on having us create a chain of touch around room that leads to and from the challah, which she then explains as both exemplifying the connection created when people eat together and the chain of work that went to creating the challah itself." . . .Continue Reading. . . ☞
  • נשמת כל חי | Nishmat Kol Ḥai: The Breath of All Life (for Shabbat morning) by Rabbi Rachel Barenblat

    נשמת כל חי | Nishmat Kol Ḥai: The Breath of All Life (for Shabbat morning) by Rabbi Rachel Barenblat

    ...if we could discard differences: human, animal, fire, stone, seed, snow even that cry of togetherness would not be enough to thank You. . . .Continue Reading. . . ☞
  • פרק שירה | Perek Shirah (Chapter of Song), a hymn of creation

    פרק שירה | Perek Shirah (Chapter of Song), a hymn of creation

    Talmudic and midrashic sources contain hymns of the creation usually based on homiletic expansions of metaphorical descriptions and personifications of the created world in the Bible. The explicitly homiletic background of some of the hymns in Perek Shira indicates a possible connection between the other hymns and Tannaitic and Amoraic homiletics, and suggests a hymnal index to well-known, but mostly unpreserved, homiletics. The origin of this work, the period of its composition and its significance may be deduced from literary parallels. A Tannaitic source in the tractate Hagiga of the Jerusalem (Hag. 2:1,77a—b) and Babylonian Talmud (Hag. 14b), in hymns of nature associated with apocalyptic visions and with the teaching of ma’aseh merkaba serves as a key to Perek Shira’s close spiritual relationship with this literature. Parallels to it can be found in apocalyptic literature, in mystic layers in Talmudic literature, in Jewish mystical prayers surviving in fourth-century Greek Christian composition, in Heikhalot literature, and in Merkaba mysticism. The affinity of Perek Shira with Heikhalot literature, which abounds in hymns, can be noted in the explicitly mystic introduction to the seven crowings of the cock — the only non-hymnal text in the collection — and the striking resemblance between the …Continue Reading. . . ☞
  • Prayer of a Retail Worker

    Prayer of a Retail Worker

    May it be Your will, O Lord my God and God of my ancestors, to deliver me this day, and every day, from cranky customers and from cowardly managers; and if I must deal with them, grant me the patience and the wits to make things work. Grant me also an easy temper with my daughter, and let me not lose sight of her preciousness for one instant. And let me devote myself to my duties to my (wife/husband, and always keep her happiness in mind, and show her often that I love her. For all this, I ask You to help me, because I cannot do it alone. . . .Continue Reading. . . ☞
  • מגילת אנטיוכוס | Megillat Antiochus translated into German by Chajm Guski

    מגילת אנטיוכוס | Megillat Antiochus translated into German by Chajm Guski

    Es war in den Tagen des Antiochus, dem König der Griechen, eines großen und starken Königs, fest in seiner Herrschaft, und alle Könige hörten auf ihn. Er eroberte viele Länder und besiegte starke Könige, verwüstete ihre Paläste, verbrannte sie im Feuer und warf ihre Bewohner gefesselt in den Kerker. Seit den Tagen Alexanders stand kein solcher König auf, an der Küste des großen Meeres. Und er erbaute am Ufer des Meeres eine mächtige Stadt, als Königssitz, und nannte die Stadt Antiochia - nach seinem Namen. . . .Continue Reading. . . ☞
  • ידיד נפש | Yedid Nefesh – You who love my soul (translation by Rabbi Zalman Schachter-Shalomi)

    ידיד נפש | Yedid Nefesh – You who love my soul (translation by Rabbi Zalman Schachter-Shalomi)

    You who love my soul Compassion's gentle source, Take my disposition and shape it to Your will. Like a darting deer I will flee to You. Before Your glorious Presence Humbly I do bow. Let Your sweet love Delight me with its thrill Because no other dainty Will my hunger still. . . .Continue Reading. . . ☞
  • Psalms 126, a poetic translation by Shim’on Menachem

    Psalms 126, a poetic translation by Shim’on Menachem

    This Psalm is straightforwardly post-exilic (for which see Sefer haWiki) but switches in its narrative perspective between before and after the return from Babylon, between gratitude and longing for return, helped by the profoundly non-linear mechanics of verbal tense and aspect in biblical Hebrew. The Psalmist chooses words associated with joy (s’ḥoq, rinah) that are tinged with other, more complicated emotions. Here’s what came out. . . .Continue Reading. . . ☞
  • Scaling the Walls of the Labyrinth: Psalms 67 and Ana b’Koaḥ

    Scaling the Walls of the Labyrinth: Psalms 67 and Ana b’Koaḥ

    Psalm 67 is a priestly blessing for all the peoples of the earth to be sustained by the earth's harvest (yevulah), and it is a petition that all humanity recognize the divine nature (Elohim) illuminating the world. Composed of seven verses, the psalm is often visually depicted as a seven branched menorah. There are 49 words in the entire psalm, and in the Nusaḥ ha-ARI z"l there is one word for each day of the Sefirat haOmer. Similarly, the fifth verse has 49 letters and each letter can be used as a focal point for meditating on the meaning of the day in its week in the journey to Shavuot, the festival of weeks (the culmination of the barley harvest), and the festival of oaths (shevuot) in celebration of receiving the Torah. Many of the themes of Psalm 67 are repeated in the prayer Ana b'Koaḥ, which also has 49 words, and which are also used to focus on the meaning of each day on the cyclical and labyrinthine journey towards Shavuot. . . .Continue Reading. . . ☞
  • אמרי לב | Imrei Lev – Meditations And Prayers For Every Situation And Occasion In Life by Jonas Ennery, translated by Hester Rothschild, and adapted by Isaac Leeser (1866)

    אמרי לב | Imrei Lev – Meditations And Prayers For Every Situation And Occasion In Life by Jonas Ennery, translated by Hester Rothschild, and adapted by Isaac Leeser (1866)

    General public forms of prayer may not always be adapted to the peculiar exigencies of every mind; the compilers of this work have therefore striven to supply in some measure this spiritual need, by meditations and prayers suited to every situation and occasion in life; and it has been the humble yet anxious endeavour of the translator to preserve the spirit of the original in its English garb. . . .Continue Reading. . . ☞
  • A D’var Tefillah on Zombies, Elul, and Psalms 27 by Rabbi Jessica Minnen

    A D’var Tefillah on Zombies, Elul, and Psalms 27 by Rabbi Jessica Minnen

    As the month of Elul wanes, we are preparing. We prepare for the new moon, we prepare for Rosh Hashanah, and we prepare for the zombie invasion. I have it on good authority, as do you, that the onslaught is imminent. The alarm blares every morning -- a shofar blast and a warning... . . .Continue Reading. . . ☞
  • הבדלה | Distinctions (Havdalah) for the end of Shabbat

    הבדלה | Distinctions (Havdalah) for the end of Shabbat

    Wax drips from the braided candle. Cinnamon tingles the nose to keep us from fainting as the extra soul departs. Stop now. Notice this hinge between Shabbat and what's next. . . .Continue Reading. . . ☞

Research, Essays, and Articles on the Open Siddur and Open Source Judaism

  • The afikoman hiding in plain sight: On Freedom and Roleplaying in Re-enacting Judaim’s Archetypal Heroes Journey (Aharon Varady, 2011)

    The afikoman hiding in plain sight: On Freedom and Roleplaying in Re-enacting Judaim’s Archetypal Heroes Journey (Aharon Varady, 2011)

    How good are you playing this amazing, venerable role-playing game called Judaism? Playing your whole life? Grand. So is it fun? Is it worthwhile? Would you recommend it to your friends? No. All right... so why not? Oh. Yeah. Oh... true. Ok, yeah, those are all good reasons. But what if I told you there was a way to play it better. Not everyone will catch on at first, but it should satisfy the most conservative players AND the most innovative. The geeks will love it and it will lower the bar for entry to even the most simple of players. Ok, it does sound too good to be true. But hey, what's the point of playing the game if you're not willing to suspend the physics of the familiar and try on a new set of rules. Embrace the illusion. Try on a new reality. Help create a new one, together. I just want players to use their imagination, feel appreciated instead of alienated, and just improve the game for everyone. So what is it? I'll tell you. . . .Continue Reading. . . ☞
  • “Prayer Unbound” (Hadara Graubart, Tablet Magazine 2009)

    “Prayer Unbound” (Hadara Graubart, Tablet Magazine 2009)

    We're honored to have our project the focus of an article in Tablet. . . .Continue Reading. . . ☞

"Impressió librorum". Engraving by Phillipus Galle of a drawing by Johannes Stradanus (Theodor Galle, Nova Reperta, Antwerp?, between 1590 and 1612?, No. 4. Madrid. ER/1605 National Library). This image has been significantly modified by Aharon Varady (license: CC-BY-SA).

“Impressió librorum”. Engraving by Phillipus Galle of a drawing by Johannes Stradanus (Theodor Galle, Nova Reperta, Antwerp?, between 1590 and 1612?, No. 4. Madrid. ER/1605 National Library). This image has been significantly modified by Aharon Varady (license: CC-BY-SA).

Imagine a printing press and book arts studio shared by everyone in the world looking to design and craft their own siddur.

The Open Siddur Project is building it, online, on the web: a collaborative digital-to-print publishing application where you can make your own siddur, share your work, and adopt, adapt, and redistribute work shared by others — work intended for creative reuse and inclusion in new siddurim and related works of Jewish spiritual practice.

Imagine an open studio built around privacy, collaboration, and a public database and digital library of Jewish liturgy in a format that can easily show historical variations and changes across Jewish traditions, manuscripts, and facsimile editions.

Imagine a collection of text and recordings, freely licensed for creative reuse in every language Jews pray in or have ever prayed. Reimagine your siddur, custom tailored to your practice, replete with your insights and those selected from your friends, family, and the complete corpus of Jewish tradition, and a record of your family’s and community’s minhagim and nusaḥ.

You can help us realize this vision…. ☞ Continue reading

Last updated: 2015-7-26 15:02


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