בסיעתא דשמיא

 

Prayers, liturgy, and related work

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Meet Open Siddur contributor

The HierophantThe Hierophant

A hierophant is a person who invites participants in a sacred exercise into the presence of that which is deemed holy. The title, hierophant, originated in Ancient Greece and combines the words φαίνω (phainein, "to show") and ‏τα ειρα (ta hiera, "the holy"); hierophants served as interpreters of sacred mysteries and arcane principles. For the Open Siddur Project, the Hierophant welcomes new contributors and explains our mission: ensuring creatively inspired work intended for communal use is shared freely for creative reuse and redistribution.

חנוכה | Midrash Ma’aseh Ḥanukah

Winter Selections

Miscellaneous Liturgy & Related Work in the Open Siddur Archive

  • Hatarat Nedarim: The Release of Vows by Reb Zalman Schachter-Shalomi

    Hatarat Nedarim: The Release of Vows by Reb Zalman Schachter-Shalomi

    Almost everyone who is Jewish knows that Kol Nidre is about releasing vows and has participated in the ceremony. Few know the parallel ritual done in small groups before Rosh Hashanah. Traditionally, right before Rosh Hashanah one performs this simple ritual with three friends, each in turn becoming the petitioner, while the other three act as the beit din, the judges in a court. The ritual is a wonderful way to enter the holidays as well as to prepare oneself for what will happen on Yom Kippur. . . .Continue Reading. . . ☞
  • סליחות | Sliḥot Prayers to the Inner Child within us by Miriam Rubin

    סליחות | Sliḥot Prayers to the Inner Child within us by Miriam Rubin

    For all the times that I've judged you, and you shut down. For the times when I've cast eyes of displeasure on your creative and luminous works, For the times when I secretly whisper nasty things about you, that I would never say out loud, For the times when I've asphyxiated you, and you felt cut off from your sacred life force... . . .Continue Reading. . . ☞
  • האותיות של האבג״ד בעברית | A Periodic Table of the Hebrew Aleph Bet Emphasizing Phonetic Grouping, Symbolic Association, and Diversity of Letter Form

    האותיות של האבג״ד בעברית | A Periodic Table of the Hebrew Aleph Bet Emphasizing Phonetic Grouping, Symbolic Association, and Diversity of Letter Form

    Basic Hebrew letter and vowel lists adorn the opening pages of a number of siddurim published a century ago -- evidence of the centrality of the Jewish prayer book as a common curricular resource. But the Hebrew letters are not only essential to fluency in Hebrew language, they are also the atomic elements composing the world of the rabbinic Jewish imagination. This is especially so for those who conceive in their devotional literary practices an implicit theurgical capability in modifying and adapting the world of language though interpretation, translation, and innovative composition. To create a world with speech relies on thought and this creative ability is only limited by the facility of the creator to derive meaning from a language's underlying structure. This, therefore, is a table of the Hebrew letters arranged in order of their numerical value, in rows 1-9, 10-90, and 100-9000, so that elements with similar numerical structure, (but dissimilar phonetic amd symbolic attributes) appear in vertical columns. Attention has been given to the literal meaning of the letter names and the earliest glyph forms known for each letter in the Hebrew abgad. . . .Continue Reading. . . ☞
  • Seder Avodat Lev: early morning prayers of the farmers of the Adamah Fellowship

    Seder Avodat Lev: early morning prayers of the farmers of the Adamah Fellowship

    We are grateful to the Adamah Fellowship at Isabella Freedman for sharing the morning prayers for their Avodat Lev (Heart Work). The arrangement of prayers is organized on a one page songsheet, with translations shared with a Creative Commons Attribution/ShareAlike (CC-BY-SA) 3.0 Unported license. . . .Continue Reading. . . ☞
  • Prayer for the Earth, Air, Water, Fire of our Planet in Memory of Barry Commoner by Rabbi Arthur Waskow

    Prayer for the Earth, Air, Water, Fire of our Planet in Memory of Barry Commoner by Rabbi Arthur Waskow

    May the words we are with Your help sharing today, Speak deeply –- with Your help -- to our nation and the world. Help us all to know that the sharing of our breath with all of life Is the very proof, the very truth, that we are One. . . .Continue Reading. . . ☞
  • Saturday Afternoon Request by Rabbi Rachel Barenblat

    Saturday Afternoon Request by Rabbi Rachel Barenblat

    Help me to silence my mind's aggravation alarm, to quiet the voice which says the to-do list matters, to temporarily eschew continuous partial attention. . . .Continue Reading. . . ☞
  • סדר תפילות | The Seder Tefillot of Rabbi Moshe ben Maimon (c. 1180 CE)

    סדר תפילות | The Seder Tefillot of Rabbi Moshe ben Maimon (c. 1180 CE)

    This post is a storage container for facsimile editions and digital transcriptions of Maimonides' Seder Tefillot (Order of Prayers) found at the end of his Sefer Ahava (Book of Love) in his Mishneh Torah. . . .Continue Reading. . . ☞
  • תפילה למען ילדי העולם | Prayer for the Children of the World by Rabbi Nava Hefetz, translated by Shaul Vardi

    תפילה למען ילדי העולם | Prayer for the Children of the World by Rabbi Nava Hefetz, translated by Shaul Vardi

    A translation in Arabic and English of Rabbi Nava Hafetz's prayer for the children of the world: Creator of all life, sovereign of peace, Bless our children and the children of all the world With physical, emotional, and spiritual health. You who created them in Your image And lovingly imbued them with Your spirit, Let their paths be successful in this world that You created. Give them of Your resilience and strengthen the sinews of their bodies and minds. Guard and save them from all evil For Your mercy and truth abound. Grant peace to the Land and everlasting happiness to all its inhabitants. Amen, may it be Your will . . .Continue Reading. . . ☞
  • A Thanksgiving Day Prayer for the Residents of El-Arakib by Rabbi Arik Ascherman

    A Thanksgiving Day Prayer for the Residents of El-Arakib by Rabbi Arik Ascherman

    How is it that El-Arakib sits alone and desolate, like a widow a seventh time? "The Daughter of Zion has lost her glory." (Lamentations 1:6) For, while we had dreamed that our state would "Ensure complete equality of social and political rights to all its inhabitants irrespective of religion, race or gender," (Israeli Declaration of Independence) our prayers have not yet been fulfilled. . . .Continue Reading. . . ☞
  • חג הכנסה לברית | Ḥag hakhnassah labrit – On Entering the Covenant by Rabbi Dr. Aryeh Cohen

    חג הכנסה לברית | Ḥag hakhnassah labrit – On Entering the Covenant by Rabbi Dr. Aryeh Cohen

    In the weeks leading up to the birth of our first child in 1997, my partner and I spent a lot of time thinking about the brit. Whether it was a boy or a girl we knew that we would have a celebration. If it was a boy we would have a brit, yet we were not happy with the ceremony as it stood. If it was a girl we needed a ceremony which was equally powerful and yet didn’t draw blood. In response to these two concerns I wrote a liturgy for what I called a chag hachnassah labrit/celebration of entering the covenant which could be easily adapted to boys and girls, and I wrote a piyyut (a liturgical poem) for a milah/a circumcision. . . .Continue Reading. . . ☞
  • The Mapmaker

    The Mapmaker

    Cold facts. Colder realities. The preacher who lost his way The librarian who empties the shelves The cook without a spoon The child masking as a king The king masking as a child. The mapmaker studies them all Furrowing his brow tightly Crafting lines delicately. Charges Nothing And Changes Everything . . .Continue Reading. . . ☞
  • Musical Liturgy and Traditions of Colonial American Jews

    Musical Liturgy and Traditions of Colonial American Jews

    Early American Jewry's liturgies and rituals were conducted in a western Sephardi tradition which had developed in the late 16th and early 17th centuries in Amsterdam. Although most of the members of the first American Jewish communities were of Spanish and Portuguese origins, their worship evolved in the style of the Dutch Sepharadim. These oral transmissions led to adaptations and variations but Sephardi ḥazzanim (cantors) succeeded in passing their repertoire down to succeeding generations. These tunes are still identified with the American Sephardi tradition. . . .Continue Reading. . . ☞
  • The Rainbow Haftarah by Rabbi Arthur Waskow, translated by Rabbi Zalman Schachter-Shalomi

    The Rainbow Haftarah by Rabbi Arthur Waskow, translated by Rabbi Zalman Schachter-Shalomi

    I call you to make from fire not an all-consuming blaze But the light in which all beings see each other fully. All different, All bearing One Spark. I call you to light a flame to see more clearly That the earth and all who live as part of it Are not for burning: A flame to see The rainbow in the many-colored faces of all life. . . .Continue Reading. . . ☞

Research, Essays, and Articles on the Open Siddur and Open Source Judaism

  • Pirate Siddurim vs. Open Siddurim

    Pirate Siddurim vs. Open Siddurim

    Culture hacking either respects copyright or ignores it. One of the pillars of the Open Siddur is its respect of copyright and its attempt to make available a digitized repository of Siddur content that is available for editing, mashups, and remixing, i.e., "derivative works" that may be redistributed without restriction. For example, we want you to have the freedom to take the nusaḥ Ashkenaz, borrow kavanot from the nusaḥ sfard, and piyyutim (liturgical poetry) from the nusaḥ Romaniote; add and edit existing translations of familiar psalms and contribute and share your own translation of obscure piyyutim; share the pdf you build at Open Siddur and give it to an artist to apply an even more beautiful layout than the one we provide; and even redistribute the siddur commercially. . . .Continue Reading. . . ☞
  • Efraim Feinstein presents the Open Siddur Project at NewCAJE, 2010

    Efraim Feinstein presents the Open Siddur Project at NewCAJE, 2010

    At the beginning of the talk, the audience expressed some discomfort with the idea of copying from one website to another, even if the original author is attributed. The main concern seemed to be that the author potentially loses control of his/her message if he/she has no idea of the remainder of the content of the website. On the other hand, one audience member who posts reviews on book review sites had an innate sense of the concept of mutual benefit: she posts reviews of the books she reads in part because she reads reviews posted by others. . . .Continue Reading. . . ☞

"Impressió librorum". Engraving by Phillipus Galle of a drawing by Johannes Stradanus (Theodor Galle, Nova Reperta, Antwerp?, between 1590 and 1612?, No. 4. Madrid. ER/1605 National Library). This image has been significantly modified by Aharon Varady (license: CC-BY-SA).

“Impressió librorum”. Engraving by Phillipus Galle of a drawing by Johannes Stradanus (Theodor Galle, Nova Reperta, Antwerp?, between 1590 and 1612?, No. 4. Madrid. ER/1605 National Library). This image has been significantly modified by Aharon Varady (license: CC-BY-SA).

Imagine a printing press and book arts studio shared by everyone in the world looking to design and craft their own siddur.

The Open Siddur Project is building it, online, on the web: a collaborative digital-to-print publishing application where you can make your own siddur, share your work, and adopt, adapt, and redistribute work shared by others — work intended for creative reuse and inclusion in new siddurim and related works of Jewish spiritual practice.

Imagine an open studio built around privacy, collaboration, and a public database and digital library of Jewish liturgy in a format that can easily show historical variations and changes across Jewish traditions, manuscripts, and facsimile editions.

Imagine a collection of text and recordings, freely licensed for creative reuse in every language Jews pray in or have ever prayed. Reimagine your siddur, custom tailored to your practice, replete with your insights and those selected from your friends, family, and the complete corpus of Jewish tradition, and a record of your family’s and community’s minhagim and nusaḥ.

You can help us realize this vision…. ☞ Continue reading

Last updated: 2015-7-26 15:02


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