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Contributors (A→Z)

The Open Siddur Project is a volunteer-driven collaboration between folk passionate about Jewish spiritual practice. Some are interested in the Siddur as a technology for preserving and disseminating an evolving history of Jewish ritual, practice, and sacred poetry. Others are energized by the design challenge of crafting Siddurim that function effectively for nurturing spiritual, emotional and creative intelligence. All of us see the potential that creative engagement holds for empowering students and teachers to take ownership of those ingredients comprising their shared cultural inheritance.

The Open Siddur is a non-prescriptive, non-denominational project whose only intent is to help revitalize Judaism by ensuring its collective spiritual resources — the creative content intended for communal use — remain free for creative reuse. The Open Siddur Project invites participation without prejudice towards ethnic heritage, skin color, nationality, belief or non-belief, sex, gender, sexuality or any other consideration. All we ask for is an intellectually honest commitment to the principles and sensibilities preserved in our mission statement.




Shmuel Yosef Agnon
Shmuel Yosef Agnon
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shmuel_Yosef_Agnon
Shmuel Yosef Agnon שמואל יוסף עגנון‎ (also, Shai Agnon or S. Y. Agnon ש"י עגנון) (July 17, 1888 – February 17, 1970) was a Nobel Prize laureate writer and one of the central figures of modern Hebrew fiction. Agnon was born in Polish Galicia, then part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, and later immigrated to Mandatory Palestine, and died in Jerusalem, Israel. His works deal with the conflict between the traditional Jewish life and language and the modern world. They also attempt to recapture the fading traditions of the Yiddish shtetl. In a wider context, he also contributed to broadening the characteristic conception of the narrator's role in literature. Agnon shared the Nobel Prize with the poet Nelly Sachs in 1966.
Katy Z. Allen
Katy Z. Allen
http://www.mayantikvah.org
Rabbi Katy Z. Allen is the founder and spiritual leader of Ma'yan Tikvah - A Wellspring of Hope, a non-traditional congregation that holds services outdoors all year. She began her career as a biology teacher, turned to writing and editing educational materials, then started teaching Hebrew school and became involved in family and adult education before entering rabbinical school. She received a Masters of Arts in Jewish Studies from Hebrew College in Newton, MA, in 1999, and rabbinic ordination from the Academy for Jewish Religion in Yonkers, NY, in 2005 and became a Board Certified Chaplain through Neshama: Association of Jewish Chaplains. For ten years, Katy served as a staff chaplain at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston and then as a hospice chaplain. She is the co-founder and President pro-tem of the Jewish Climate Action Network (www.jewishclimate.org) and the facilitator of the One Earth Collaborative (www.oneearth.today), a project of Open Spirit in Framingham, MA, where she engages with the community as an eco-chaplain. lives in Wayland, MA, with her spouse, Gabi Mezger, who leads the singing at Ma'yan Tikvah. She blogs about Torah and Earth at www.mayantikvah.blogspot.com.
Adina Allen
Adina Allen
http://adinaallen.com
Rabbi Adina Allen is a spiritual leader, writer and designer of transformative learning opportunities. Integrating a lifetime of experience in the creative arts with her rabbinic training Adina provides a unique and enlivening approach to Judaism. Her original research using painting, text study and reflective writing to generate contemporary midrash was published in the Winter 2013 edition of the CCAR Journal. Adina has taught Jewish text through a wide variety of creative arts modalities at institutions including Hillels, synagogues, and Jewish communal organizations across the country and abroad. As a recipient of the CIRCLE Fellowship Adina designed and facilitated a semester-long curriculum “Art as Inquiry into Interfaith Leadership” that resulted in an exhibition of the art and writing produced by participants. Adina is co-founder of the Movement Minyan, a method that explores Jewish liturgy through embodied practice, and was the 2012 National Havurah Summer Institute Liturgist in Residence. Former Assistant Editor of Tikkun magazine, Adina is a contributing writer to the Huffington Post and her work has been published in Tikkun, The Journal for Inter-Religious Dialogue, and State of Formation, among others. Ordained by Hebrew College in 2014 Adina is an alumnus of the Wexner Graduate Fellowship.
Yehoyada Amir
Yehoyada Amir
http://yehoyada-amir.blogspot.com/
Yehoyada Amir is a Professor of Modern Jewish Thought at Hebrew Union College – Jerusalem. His attention is drawn to religious, humanistic approaches to Jewish existence in light of modernity, the memory of the Shoa, and the unique responsibility of Israeli Jews. For ten years (1999-2009) Rabbi Amir served as the director of HUC's Israel Rabbinic Program. Rabbi Amir is an active member of Maram, the Israel Council of Reform Rabbis and served in various periods as a board member of the council. He has a leading role in contemporary theological-religious, social and ethical discourse in Israel's Reform Movement as well as in neighboring circles.
Rabbi Julia Andelman
Julia Andelman
http://www.jtsa.edu/julia-andelman
As JTS’s director of community engagement, Rabbi Julia Andelman oversees adult learning programs across North America, digital learning, continuing rabbinic education, millennial engagement, and Prozdor. Since joining JTS in 2013, she has initiated livestreaming of JTS’s public lectures, created a video studio for digital learning programs, developed high-level curricula for congregations and other settings, and increased continuing rabbinic education tenfold. Julia previously served as the rabbi of Congregation Shaare Zedek in Manhattan, the director of adult education and programming at Park Avenue Synagogue, and the director of the iEngage Project at the Hartman Institute of North America. She was ordained by JTS in 2006.
Trisha Arlin
Trisha Arlin
http://triganza.blogspot.com
Trisha Arlin is a liturgist, performer and student of prayer in Brooklyn, NY, and a part-time rabbinic student at the Academy for Jewish Religion. Trisha has served as Scholar/Artist In Residence at various synagogues in the US and was Liturgist-In-Residence during the National Havurah Committee 2014 Summer Institute. She has taught her workshop, Writing Personal Prayer, at Limmud NY, the NHC Institute, Shavuot Across Brooklyn and synagogues in New York, New Jersey and Ohio. “PLACE YOURSELF”, a collection of new liturgy and kavannot, is forthcoming from Dimus Parrhesia Press.  Trisha's work is published online at triganza.blogspot.com, RitualWell, and the Open Siddur Project. and in print in “Jews And Pluralism” (Ben Yehuda Press), “The Sacred Table” (CCAR Press) and "A Poet's Siddur" ( Ain't Got No Press).
Margaret Armour
http://desturmobed.blogspot.com/2012/10/margaret-armour.html
Margaret Armour (b. Abercorn, West Lothian, Scotland, 10 September 1860; d. Edinburgh, 13 October 1943) was a poet, novelist and translator.
Arnaud Aron
Arnaud Aron
Arnaud Aron (March 11, 1807, in Sulz unterm Walde, Alsace – April 3, 1890), the Grand Rabbi of Strasbourg, began his Talmudic studies at an early age at Hagenau and continued them at Frankfort-on-the-Main. In 1830 he became rabbi of the small community of Hegenheim in Upper Alsace; and of Strasbourg in 1833. As he was under thirty, the age prescribed by law, he required a special dispensation to qualify for the office. In Strasbourg, Aron acquired the reputation of an eloquent and inspiring preacher and a zealous communal worker. He assisted in founding the School of Arts and Trades and took active interest in other useful institutions. In 1855 he convened an assembly of the rabbis of the department of the Lower Rhine for the consideration of religious questions. Aron was the author of the catechism used for confirmation as prescribed by the Consistory of Lower Alsace. In 1866 the French government acknowledged his services by appointing him a Knight of the Legion of Honor. In 1870, while Strasbourg was besieged, it was he, together with the archbishop, who raised the white flag on the cathedral. Subsequently he was decorated by the German emperor.
Arik Ascherman
Arik Ascherman
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arik_Ascherman
Arik Ascherman is an American-born Israeli Reform rabbi, and co-founder and former Executive Director for Rabbis for Human Rights. As a human rights and political activist, he has spearheaded protests to defend Palestinians against Israeli settler violence. He appears in the 2010 documentary Israel vs Israel. In 2009 he was co-recipient (with Alice Shalvi) of the Leibowitz Prize, presented by the Yesh Din human rights organization for public activism. In 2011 he was co-recipient (with Rabbi Ehud Bandel, a co-founder of Rabbis for Human Rights) of the Gandhi Peace Award," for their nonviolent methods of resolving human rights abuses in Israel and the Occupied Territories."
Mashiah Asgari
Mashiah Asgari, resident of Herat, was a young singer and scribe in 19th or early 20th century Afghanistan.
Yoni Ashar
Yoni Ashar
http://psych.colorado.edu/~clinical/students/ashar.html
Yoni Ashar is a graduate student in clinical psychology at the University of Colorado-Bolder. His research interests include biological and statistical approaches to understanding well-being and interventions enhancing well-being.
Yehuda Ashlag
Yehuda Ashlag
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yehuda_Ashlag
Rabbi Yehuda Leib Ha-Levi Ashlag (1885–1954, Hebrew: רַבִּי יְהוּדָה לֵיבּ הַלֵּוִי אַשְׁלַג‎‎), also known as the Baal Ha-Sulam (Hebrew: בַּעַל הַסּוּלָם‎‎, "Author of the Ladder") in reference to his magnum opus, was an rabbi and kabbalist born in Łódź, Congress Poland, Russian Empire, to a family of scholars connected to the Ḥasidic courts of Porisov and Belz. Rabbi Ashlag lived in erets Yisrael from 1922 until his death in 1954 (except for two years in England). In addition to his Sulam commentary on the Zohar, his other primary work, Talmud Eser Sefirot is regarded as the central textbook for students of Kabbalah. Ashlag systematically interpreted the wisdom of Kabbalah and promoted its wide dissemination. In line with his directives, many contemporary adherents of Ashlag’s teachings strive to spread Kabbalah to the masses. (adapted from his articlewikipedia)
Unknown Author(s)
Sometimes the best we can do in attributing a historical work is to indicate the period and place it was written, the first prayer book it may have been printed in, or the archival collection in which the manuscript was found. We invite the public to help to attribute all works to their original composers. If you know something not mentioned in the commentary offered, please comment!
Elazar ben Moshe Azikri
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elazar_ben_Moshe_Azikri
Rabbi Elazar ben Moshe Azikri (Hebrew: אלעזר בן משה אזכרי‎‎‎) (1533–1600) was a Jewish kabbalist, poet and writer, born in Safed to a Sephardic family who had settled in the Land of Israel after the expulsion from Spain. Rabbi Elazar studied Torah under Rabbi Yosef Sagis and Rabbi Jacob Berab, and is counted with the greatest Rabbis and intellectuals of his time: Shlomo Halevi Alkabetz, Yosef Karo, Moshe Cordovero, Isaac Luria, Israel Najara, etc. In 1588 Rabbi Elazar founded the "Sukat Shalom" movement who acted to arouse in Jews the devotion to religion. Rabbi Elazar died in 1600 and was buried in Safed. Rabbi Elazar's Book, the Sefer Haredim (ספר חרדים), printed after his death in 1600, is considered as one of the main books of Jewish deontology. He also wrote a commentary on Tractate Bezah and Berachot of the Jerusalem Talmud. The Piyyut (liturgical poem) Yedid Nefesh (ידיד נפש) was composed by Rabbi Elazar. (via wikipedia)



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