בסיעתא דשמיא

המחזור לראש השנה ויום כּיפּור | Ha-Maḥzor for Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur by Rabbi Ben-Zion Bokser (1959)

Arranged and translated by Rabbi Ben-Zion Bokser, Ha-Maḥzor (1959) and Ha-Siddur (1957), are the most recent modern prayerbooks to have entered the Public Domain. (Both Ha-Siddur and Ha-Maḥzor entered the Public Domain due to lack of copyright renewal by the copyright owner listed in the copyright notice, the Hebrew Publishing Company.) Making digital images of . . .

הסדור | Ha-Siddur by Rabbi Ben-Zion Bokser (1957)

Arranged and translated by Rabbi Ben-Zion Bokser, Ha-Maḥzor (1959) and Ha-Siddur (1957), are the most recent modern prayerbooks to have entered the Public Domain. (Both Ha-Siddur and Ha-Maḥzor entered the Public Domain due to lack of copyright renewal by the copyright owner listed in the copyright notice, the Hebrew Publishing Company.) Making digital images of . . .

סידור עבודת ישראל | Siddur Aḅodath Yisrael, 2nd revised edition (1873) arranged by R’ Benjamin Szold and translated by R’ Marcus Jastrow

The siddur, Aḅodath Yisrael was first prepared for Temple Oheb Shalom (Baltimore, Maryland) by Rabbi Benjamin Szold (1829-1902). Before Szold’s arrival in 1859, the congregation had adopted for use in its Shabbat service the Minhag America by the Reform rabbi, Isaac Meyer Wise. After much discussion with his congregation Szold introduced Aḅodath Yisrael, which hewed more closely to traditional Ashkenazi custom. The first edition of this prayer-book appeared in 1863 with German translation, and was widely adopted by congregations in the United States. New editions were published in 1864 and 1865 (the latter with English translation), and another, revised edition in 1871, by Rabbis Marcus Jastrow of Philadelphia (1829-1903) and Henry Hochheimer of Baltimore (1818-1912). . . .

סדר תפילות ישראל | Seder Tefilot Yisrael: Sabbath and Festival Prayer Book (Joint Commission of the Rabbinical Assembly and United Synagogue of America, 1946)

Siddur Tefilot Yisrael (Sabbath & Festival Prayer Book), based upon a manuscript of Rabbi Morris Silverman, was widely used in Conservative synagogues until the late 1980s and remains a favorite prayerbook for many who grew up using it. First published by the Rabbinical Assembly and United Synagogue of America under their copyright, this siddur is . . .

המדריך | Ha-Madrikh: The Rabbi’s Guide by R’ Hyman E. Goldin (1939, rev. 1956)

This manual has been devised for the express purpose of giving the Rabbi, or anyone officiating at a Jewish ceremonial or ritual, a concise and practical aid that will facilitate the task of officiating , and will obviate the necessity of resorting to the voluminous literature pertaining thereto. . . .

סידור זכרון יהודה לייב | Siddur Zichron Yehudah Leib, a Friday Night Siddur dedicated in honor of Leonard Nimoy, z”l (2017)

The goal of this project was to produce a complete prayerbooklet for the Friday night Kabbalat Shabbat and Ma’ariv service that was as compact as possible yet user-friendly. This booklet is designed to be printed on 9 double-sided sheets of paper, folded and saddle stapled. It was commissioned for a minyan held annually at the Arisia science fiction convention in Boston, MA, and dedicated in honor of Leonard Nimoy, z”l (1931–2015). Since Arisia takes place in mid-January, we omitted all special insertions for holidays and other times of year. A companion booklet which includes insertions for year-round use is in the works. . . .

הסדור השלם | Ha-Siddur Ha-Shalem, The Daily Prayerbook by Paltiel Birnbaum (Hebrew Publishing Company, 1949)

Ha-Siddur Ha-Shalem (The [Complete] Daily Prayer Book), translated and arranged by Paltiel Birnbaum, was widely used in Orthodox and Conservative synagogues until the late 1980s and remains a favorite prayerbook for many who grew up using it. First published by the Hebrew Publishing Company in 1949 under their copyright, this siddur is in the Public . . .

B’Sefer Ḥayyim: A Maḥzor for the Days of Awe

This is a complete* Jewish Renewal/Reconstructionist Machzor for Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur, primarily influenced by the davennin of Reb Zalman and the Aquarian Minyan. All text in English is gender-neutral. All Hebrew prayers are accompanied by transliteration. Material for Shabbat is at the back of the book. Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur prayers are . . .

ברכות והודאות | Brakhot v’Hoda’ot (Blessings and Thanksgivings): A Birkon for the Bar Mitsvah of Yeshayahu Yisraeli

Brakhot v’Hoda’ot (Blessings and Thanksgivings): A Birkon by R’ Hillel Ḥayyim Yisraeli-Lavery. Kiddush, Havdalah and the Birkat Hamazon according to the custom of R’ Saadia Gaon, RaMBaM, and the Vilna Gaon. Zemirot, Piyyutim, and Shirim. Ma’ariv for Weekdays and for after Shabbat. A souvenir for the Bar Mitzvah of Yeshayahu Yisraeli, 19 Sivan 5776 (Shabbat Parshat Shelakh Lekha). Published in the Holy City of Yerushalayim. . . .

סדר תפלות כל השנה | The Authorised Daily Prayer Book of the United Hebrew Congregations of the British Empire (trans. R’ Simeon Singer, 9th ed., 1914) annotated by Israel Abrahams

Join us in creating a faithful digital transcription of the Annotated Edition of the Authorised Daily Prayer Book with Historical and Explanatory Notes, and Additional Matter, Compiled in Accordance with the Plans of the Rev. Simeon Singer (Israel Abrahams, English, 1914), a nusaḥ Ashkeanaz, minhag Polin siddur. After transcription and proofreading, this new digital edition will be shared under a Creative Commons Zero (CC0) Public Domain dedication. The edition will then be encoded in TEI XML and archived in the Open Siddur database, a libre Open Access liturgy database. We are grateful to the University of Toronto for imaging this Public Domain work and providing a digital copy for this effort. . . .

תהילים או לוס סאלמוס; טריסלאד’אד’וס דיל לשון הקדש אין לה לינגואה ספרדית | Psalms in Ladino (Estampado por Ǧ. Griffit, ca. 1852/3)

Join us in creating a faithful digital transcription of Tehilim, o los Salmos, trezladados del leshon ha-ḳodesh en la lingua Sefaradit (Ǧ. Griffit, 1852/3). After transcription and proofreading, this new digital edition will be encoded in TEI XML and archived in the Open Siddur database. We are grateful to the Sephardic Studies Collection at the University of Washington Library for imaging this Public Domain work. . . .

Stunden Der Andacht (Fanny Schmiedl Neuda, 1855)

I have the great pleasure to be sharing a crowdsourced labor of love, the first book of prayers that the Open Siddur Project has completely proofread on Wikisource: Stunden Der Andacht (Hours of Devotion, 1855) by Fanny Schmiedl Neuda. I initially prepared the transcription from the 145-page, 1858 edition of Stunden Der Andacht with Tesseract-OCR and a scan of the book made by Google Books. Many thanks to Open Siddur Project contributor and volunteer, Chajm Guski, for helping to upload the transcription to the German Wikisource site. Many thanks go to the untold numbers of volunteer proofreaders, both veteran Wikisource volunteers as well as the many folk who came to proofread the text after seeing a tweet, facebook status update, or reading an email asking for German fluent readers for help. . . .

Siddur Tehillat Hashem Yidaber Pi by Rabbi Zalman Schachter-Shalomi

If you are not used to reading Hebrew with comprehension and with the ability to dilate the Hebrew from the literal meaning, or if you cannot read Hebrew and need a resource for daily davvenen, I offer you this set of texts, which I, too, use frequently for myself. I translated the Psalms and the liturgy in the way in which I experience them in my feeling consciousness. This does not offer the ‘pshat’, the literal meaning of the words, but the devotional interpretation that can make it a prayer of the heart. . . .

תפלת מנחה לשבת | Shabbat Minḥah Prayers by Dr. Jakob J. Petuchowski, 1966

This prayer-leaflet was primarily intended for a group of Hebrew Union College students who met every sabbath afternoon for extra-curricular (noncredit) Torah study with Dr. Rabbi Jakob Petuchowki in the mid-1960s. Their service was conducted entirely in Hebrew and in the traditional nusaḥ with some minor but interesting Liberal innovations. Petuchowki writes, “We have omitted only the various repetitions as well as the prayer for the restoration of the sacrificial service. (But we have retained the place of Zion as the symbol of the messianic hope.) In the ‘Alenu prayer, we have preferred a positive formulation of the “Election of Israel” to the traditional negative one.” . . .


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