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☞   Parashat Devarim

This is an archive of Torah and Haftarah readings for Parashat Devarim (Deuteronomy 1:1-3:22), according to the annual Torah reading cycle.

The haftarah reading for Parashat Devarim is Isaiah 1:1-27.

Parashat Devarim is the first parashah of Sefer Devarim. It is preceded by parashat Mas’ei (Numbers 33:1-36:13). Parashat va’Etḥanan (Deuteronomy 3:23-7:11) follows it.

Click here to contribute a novel translation of a Torah or Haftarah reading you have prepared for Parashat Devarim.

פָּרָשַׁת דְבָרִים | Parashat Devarim (Deuteronomy 1:1-3:22), color-coded according to its narrative layers

The text of parashat Devarim, distinguished according to the stratigraphic layers of its composition according to the Supplementary Hypothesis. . . .

Torah Reading for Parashat Devarim (Deuteronomy 1:1-3:22): Chantable English translation with trōp, by Len Fellman

A Torah reading of Parashat Devarim in English translation, transtropilized. . . .

Haftarah Reading for Parashat Devarim (Shabbat Ḥazon, Isaiah 1:1-27), translated by Isaac Gantwerk Mayer

On Shabbat Ḥazon, the Shabbat before Tisha b’Av, many Ashkenazi communities have a custom to read most of the haftarah (Isaiah 1:1-27) in Eikha trop, the cantillation used for the Book of Lamentations. There are many distinct customs, but one of the most common reads verses at the beginning and end in standard haftarah trop, as well as several verses in the middle, selected for their more hopeful message. This edition of the haftarah for Shabbat Ḥazon, along with its new translation, has the verses recited in Eikha trop marked in blue and the verses in haftarah trop in black. . . .

Haftarah Reading for Parashat Devarim (Shabbat Ḥazon, Isaiah 1:1-27): Chantable English translation with trōp, by Len Fellman

The haftarah reading for Parashat Devarim, Shabbat Ḥazon, in English translation, transtropilized. . . .