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Prayer of the Guest Chaplain of the U.S. House of Representatives: Rabbi Arnold Resnicoff on 30 December 2019

Guest Chaplain: Rabbi Arnold Resnicoff, U.S. Navy Chaplain (Ret)., Washington DC
Sponsor:
Date of Prayer: 2019-12-30


Contribute a translation English (source)

Opening Prayer Given by the Guest Chaplain:

Almighty God,
we pray, reflect, meditate in different ways,
but as a year, a decade ends, and 2020 begins,
may we reaffirm, united, the hope of Langston Hughes:
“Let America be the dream the dreamers dreamed.”[1]Langston Hughes, “Let America Be America Again” from: A New Song (1938) 
Dreamers dreamed a nation founded on equality, rights;
a Constitution established
for a more perfect union,
for liberty for us
and our posterity.
Our votes, oaths, acts —
must reflect those dreams.

With this decade’s last House prayer,
we give thanks for progress,
look ahead with hope,
but with eyes wide open
to prejudice,
hatred,
terror that remain — fueling violence
like the antisemitic Ḥanukkah party attack Saturday,
the Texas church attack Sunday —
praying, Almighty God,
for strength to dream the bravest dream our dreamers dreamed,
our people dreamed:
“We shall overcome,
we shall overcome,
We shall overcome some day.
Deep in my heart, I do believe.
We shall overcome some day.”[2]We Shall Overcome” is a gospel song which became a protest song and a key anthem of the Civil Rights Movement. The song is most commonly attributed as being lyrically descended from “I’ll Overcome Some Day”, a hymn by Charles Albert Tindley that was first published in 1900. (from the Wikipedia article)

וְנֹאמַר
אָמֵן׃
And let us say,
Amen.

Source(s)

116th Congress, 1st Session
Issue: Vol. 165, No. 209 — Daily Edition (December 30, 2019)

Notes   [ + ]

  1. Langston Hughes, “Let America Be America Again” from: A New Song (1938)
  2. We Shall Overcome” is a gospel song which became a protest song and a key anthem of the Civil Rights Movement. The song is most commonly attributed as being lyrically descended from “I’ll Overcome Some Day”, a hymn by Charles Albert Tindley that was first published in 1900. (from the Wikipedia article)

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