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Prayer for the Government [of the United States of America], by David Nunes Carvalho (Reformed Society of Israelites, Charleston, South Carolina, 1830)

https://opensiddur.org/?p=39388 Prayer for the Government [of the United States of America], by David Nunes Carvalho (Reformed Society of Israelites, Charleston, South Carolina, 1830) 2021-10-08 00:24:16 This historically significant prayer for the government of the United States of America offered by the Reformed Society of Israelites (Charleston, S.C.), appears in <em><a href="/?p=39485">The Sabbath service and miscellaneous prayers, adopted by the Reformed society of Israelites, founded in Charleston, S.C., November 21, 1825</a></em> (1830, Bloch: 1916). Text the Open Siddur Project Aharon N. Varady (transcription) Aharon N. Varady (transcription) David Nunes Carvalho Reformed Society of Israelites https://opensiddur.org/copyright-policy/ Aharon N. Varady (transcription) https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/ Government &amp; Country After the Aliyot United States of America 19th century C.E. United States 56th century A.M. American Jewry of the United States American Reform Movement South Carolina
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Almighty God! sole ruler and governor of the whole universe!
Thou who hast created countless systems for thy glory!
Thou, who fillest all space with thy wisdom, truth, order and benevolence,
in thy boundless mercy, bless, preserve and enlighten
the President of these United States, together with his counsellors,
and all the officers of the General and State Governments,
executive, legislative and judicial.
O, may a portion of thy divine wisdom
fill the halls of their assemblies,
and direct their hearts and understandings
for the honour of thy holy name,
and the prosperity of our beloved country.
May the spirit of peace be ever in their counsels,
and integrity be their leading principle.
We have reason to bless and extol thy goodness, O Lord!
that thou hast numbered us with the inhabitants of this thy much favoured land,
uniting us all into one great family,
where the noble and virtuous mind
is the only crown of distinction,
and equality of rights
the only fountain of power.
We bless thy holy name,
that thou hast removed the intolerance of bigotry
far from out this happy republic,
and hast relieved the people
from the yoke of political and religious bondage.
May thy redeeming spirit visit all the nations of the earth,
and may the smiles of thy auspicious goodness
be a light to the eyes of rulers,
and the fear of thy justice
awaken contrition in the heart of the oppressor.
Graciously incline thine ear
to the supplications of thy servants,
assembled here this day.
Bless the people of these United States.
May sentiments of charity and friendship
unite them as citizens of one common country.
May the lights of science and civilization,
as the flaming sword of Eden,
defend them on every side
from the subtle hypocrite
and open adversary.
Spread thy benign influence, great Author of existence! over all mankind.
Grant this for the sake of thy supreme excellence
and never ending mercies,
and let us all say, Amen.

This prayer for the government of the United States of America offered by the Reformed Society of Israelites (Charleston, S.C.), appears in The Sabbath service and miscellaneous prayers, adopted by the Reformed society of Israelites, founded in Charleston, S.C., November 21, 1825 (1830, Bloch: 1916). Gary Zola writes that the prayer was written by David Carvalho for the Society as indicated in Abraham Moïse’s annotated copy of the 1830 prayerbook.[1] Find, “The First Reform Prayerbook in America” (p. 115 ft. 29) in Platforms and prayer books: theological and liturgical perspectives on Reform Judaism (2002)  Zola calls this prayer “historically significant” as it is the first time that the traditional prayer for the government was replaced by a different prayer in an American siddur. –Aharon Varady

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Notes

Notes
1 Find, “The First Reform Prayerbook in America” (p. 115 ft. 29) in Platforms and prayer books: theological and liturgical perspectives on Reform Judaism (2002)

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