Search
Exact matches only
// Home

 
//  Home  //   🖖︎ Prayers & Praxes   //   🌍︎ Collective Welfare   //   Sovereign Nations & States   //   Opening Prayers for Legislative Bodies

Prayer of the Guest Chaplain of the U.S. House of Representatives: Rabbi Dov Hillel Klein on 5 May 2010

https://opensiddur.org/?p=27099 Prayer of the Guest Chaplain of the U.S. House of Representatives: Rabbi Dov Hillel Klein on 5 May 2010 2019-09-14 13:10:50 The Opening Prayer given in the U.S. House of Representatives on 5 May 2010. Text the Open Siddur Project United States Congressional Record United States Congressional Record Dov Hillel Klein https://opensiddur.org/copyright-policy/ United States Congressional Record https://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/text/17/105 United States of America Opening Prayers for Legislative Bodies תחינות teḥinot 21st century C.E. 58th century A.M. English vernacular prayer House of Representatives Prayers of Guest Chaplains ḤaBaD Lubavitch 111th Congress Bill Cosby
Guest Chaplain: Rabbi Dov Hillel Klein, Tannenbaum Chabad House, Northwestern Jewish Center, Chicago, IL
Sponsor: Rep. Janice Schakowsky, (D-IL)
Date of Prayer: 05/05/2010

One Minute Speech Given in Recognition of the Guest Chaplain:

Ms. SCHAKOWSKY. Mr. Speaker, Rabbi, I think this is probably the first time that Bill Cosby has been part of the morning prayer. Certainly it is the first time his grandmother has been part of the prayer.

It is with great pride that I rise to welcome Rabbi Dov Hillel Klein to our Nation’s Capital as guest chaplain.

Rabbi Klein works in my hometown of Evanston, Illinois, where he is a widely respected member of the community as the district director of Lubavitch Chabad.

Rabbi Klein has had a profound impact on Chabad, not only in Evanston, but throughout the United States. He was one of the pioneers in creating Chabad on university campuses in the United States when he brought his ministry to the students at Northwestern University. Because of his continued efforts, today Chabad is on 140 campuses throughout the United States.

Rabbi Klein also serves an invaluable role in our community as one of the founders and now senior chaplain for the Evanston Police Department, where he accompanies officers in squad cars on patrol and is called upon for crisis intervention. In fact, his work with law enforcement officers around town has earned him the nickname, “Rabbi Cop.”

For all that he has done for our community, I am honored to welcome Rabbi Klein and his sons, Avramy and Levi, who are in the gallery to Congress and to thank him for his wonderful work.


Contribute a translation Source (English)

Opening Prayer Given by the Guest Chaplain:

In the Jewish tradition, one begins an invocation with words of inspiration. I have received inspiration from many individuals, but the person I am thinking of today is America’s number one dad, Bill Cosby.

Several years ago, Bill Cosby spoke at Northwestern University’s commencement. He said he was the first person in his family to attend the university. But he came to realize that just going to college does not necessarily make you all that smart, and just by going to college surely does not mean you have all the answers.

He came home after his first day of college and his grandmother asked, “Billy, what did you study?” Cosby replied that in his philosophy class they debated whether or not a half a cup of water was half empty or half full. His grandmother, who did not have a college education or even a high school diploma, responded immediately, “That’s so simple. If you are drinking, the glass is half empty, but if you are pouring, the glass is half full.”

I thought to myself, if you are drinking means that everything is for me; my entire focus is just on myself, and because of my arrogance, my selfishness and my self-centeredness, I am half empty. I wind up keeping everyone else out. But if I am pouring, pouring for others, sharing and giving to others, then I am half full, because I am letting others into my life.

G–d
please continue to bless us
so we are able to pour and let others into our lives.

We thank G–d today
for enabling us to serve this great Country
and being able to make a difference
not only in our lives,
not only in the lives of our families and friends,
but for allowing us to make a difference
in the lives of countless numbers of Americans
and people throughout the world.

We ask G–d to continue to give us
the insight,
courage,
and humility
to serve the people of the United States.

G–d
please bless all the members of Congress and their families,
and most of all,
G–d Bless America.

G–d who makes peace in the heavens and on Earth,
let us indeed have a year of peace.
 
אָמֵן׃
and let us all say
Amen.

Source(s)

111th Congress, 2nd Session
Issue: Vol. 156, No. 66 — Daily Edition (May 05, 2010)

Link: https://chaplain.house.gov/chaplaincy/display_gc.html?id=1428

Loading

 PDF (or Print)

 
 
 

 

Comments, Corrections, and Queries