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Prayer of the Guest Chaplain of the U.S. House of Representatives: Rabbi Arthur T. Buch on 1 April 1968

https://opensiddur.org/?p=55153 Prayer of the Guest Chaplain of the U.S. House of Representatives: Rabbi Arthur T. Buch on 1 April 1968 2024-03-30 18:17:51 The Opening Prayer given in the U.S. House of Representatives on 1 April 1968. Text the Open Siddur Project Aharon N. Varady (transcription) Aharon N. Varady (transcription) Arthur T. Buch United States Congressional Record https://opensiddur.org/copyright-policy/ Aharon N. Varady (transcription) https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/ Opening Prayers for Legislative Bodies United States of America 20th century C.E. תחינות teḥinot 58th century A.M. English vernacular prayer U.S. House of Representatives Prayers of Guest Chaplains 90th Congress Joint warfare in South Vietnam
Guest Chaplain: Rabbi Arthur T. Buch, Shaare Zedek Congregation, New York, New York
Sponsor: Rep. William Ryan (D-NY)
Date of Prayer: 1 April 1968

Mr. RYAN. Mr. Speaker, we are indebted today to Rabbi Arthur T. Buch, of Shaare Zedek, for the moving prayer which he offered. In these trying times, it is to our great benefit that we have in our midst a spiritual leader such as Rabbi Buch whose leadership helps us in our efforts to resolve the conflicts which confront us and in our quest for a world in which all men can live in peace and brotherhood.

Rabbi Buch’s congregation, Shaare Zedek, is the third oldest Jewish congregation in New York City, having served the residents of my congressional district on Manhattan’s West Side since 1837. It is my very special privilege to welcome the rabbi and his congregation, including the president of the congregation, Barnett Kaprow; the president of the sisterhood, Mrs. Fannie Platt; the president of the brotherhood, Sol Nodel—whose paintings were exhibited yesterday at B’nai B’rith in Washington; and Alexander Elishewitz, the director of their visit to Washington.

A Hebrew scholar and teacher, Rabbi Buch has taught at the New School for Social Research in New York City and the University of Scranton. He has a special interest in the theater, and he is about to publish a book on the Biblical influence in our modern theater, which is based on his column published weekly, entitled “The Bible on Broadway.”

We are indeed privileged to have Rabbi Buch open the proceedings of the House of Representatives. His words of prayer reflect his deep compassion and understanding.


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Contribute a translationSource (English)
Our fathers’ God
who hast endowed all humanity
with unalienable rights
of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness,[1] Cf. the US Declaration of Independence, stylized by Benjamin Franklin and penned by Thomas Jefferson, famously signed 4 July 1776. Scholars differ as to whether the historical origin of “life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness” are rooted in Lockean Rights (following after the “Virginia Declaration of Rights” written by George Mason and adopted 12 June 1776) or possibly in Jefferson’s self-proclaimed Epicureanism. –Aharon Varady. 
with whom the people of America
have entered into a compact
to guarantee that endowment,
we acknowledge the blessedness
which has come to our Nation—
its land and its people.
At this hour
when some of the blessing
is in danger of being blighted,
we ask Thy grace
upon the leader of our Republic,
the President of the United States,
the constituted officers of its realm,
and the representatives of the people.
Guide them in their decisions,
and strengthen them in their determination
to convert the agony of Vietnam
into a triumph of the spirit.
Remove the strange symbols
of hawks and doves from our midst,
and restore the American eagle
in its majestic soaring heavenward
as our chief concern and pride.
Amen.

This prayer of the guest chaplain was offered in the third month of the second session of the 90th US Congress in the House of Representatives, and published in the Congressional Record, vol. 114, part 7 (1968), page 8342.

Source(s)

Congressional Record, vol. 114, part 7 (1 April 1968), p. 8342

Congressional Record, vol. 114, part 7 (1 April 1968), p. 8343

 

Notes

Notes
1Cf. the US Declaration of Independence, stylized by Benjamin Franklin and penned by Thomas Jefferson, famously signed 4 July 1776. Scholars differ as to whether the historical origin of “life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness” are rooted in Lockean Rights (following after the “Virginia Declaration of Rights” written by George Mason and adopted 12 June 1776) or possibly in Jefferson’s self-proclaimed Epicureanism. –Aharon Varady.

 

 

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