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Prayer of the Guest Chaplain of the U.S. House of Representatives: Rabbi Toby H. Manewith on 5 March 1998

https://opensiddur.org/?p=31911 Prayer of the Guest Chaplain of the U.S. House of Representatives: Rabbi Toby H. Manewith on 5 March 1998 2020-06-08 21:24:31 The Opening Prayer given in the U.S. House of Representatives on 5 March 1998. Text the Open Siddur Project United States Congressional Record United States Congressional Record Toby Manewith https://opensiddur.org/copyright-policy/ United States Congressional Record https://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/text/17/105 United States of America Opening Prayers for Legislative Bodies House of Representatives Prayers of Guest Chaplains 105th Congress 20th century C.E. תחינות teḥinot 58th century A.M. English vernacular prayer
Guest Chaplain: Rabbi Toby H. Manewith, Director, Hillel Foundation, A.S. Kay Spiritual Life Center, American University, Washington, D.C.
Sponsor: Rep. Sidney Yates (D-IL)
Date of Prayer: 03/05/1998

One Minute Speech Given in Recognition of the Guest Chaplain:

Mr. YATES. Mr. Speaker, I take pride in having presented to the House for the prayer, Rabbi Toby Manewith. She is a constituent of mine from Chicago, where she lived until her graduation from Northwestern University in 1988. She was ordained from Hebrew Union College in 1993.

Her first post was as Hillel Director at Syracuse University, a post she held for 4 years. She took an assignment at American University last summer, where she is now.

Mr. Speaker, it is clear that this young rabbi has much to offer and I know we wish her well.


Contribute a translation Source (English)

Opening Prayer Given by the Guest Chaplain:

‘‘The world rests on three things:
On din, justice,
on emet, truth
and on shalom, peace.’’[1] Pirkei Avot 1.18. 
This, according to Shimon Ben Gamliel, the first century Jewish sage. Though these concepts are intertwined,
the first two are valued, in part, as agents;
it is through them that peace is attained.
And peace, say the sages, is but another name
for that which human beings of all walks and stations
see as divine.

Most Holy One,
May our pursuits be of justice,
And may truth light our way.
And through these may we,
our leaders,
our Nation,
its citizens,
and citizens of the world,
be guided on a path
of ever increasing peace.
אָמֵן׃
Amen.

Source(s)

105th Congress, 2nd Session
Issue: Vol. 144, No. 21 — Daily Edition (March 5, 1998)

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Notes

Notes
1 Pirkei Avot 1.18.
 

 

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