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Prayer of the Guest Chaplain of the U.S. House of Representatives: Rabbi Dr. Henry E. Kraus on 4 April 1978

https://opensiddur.org/?p=55172 Prayer of the Guest Chaplain of the U.S. House of Representatives: Rabbi Dr. Henry E. Kraus on 4 April 1978 2024-03-30 22:55:52 The Opening Prayer given in the U.S. House of Representatives on 4 April 1978. Text the Open Siddur Project Aharon N. Varady (transcription) Aharon N. Varady (transcription) Henry E. Kraus the Congressional Record of the United States of America https://opensiddur.org/copyright-policy/ Aharon N. Varady (transcription) https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/ Opening Prayers for Legislative Bodies United States of America 20th century C.E. תחינות teḥinot 58th century A.M. English vernacular prayer U.S. House of Representatives Prayers of Guest Chaplains 95th Congress
Guest Chaplain: Rabbi Henry E. Kraus, Ph.D., D.D., Temple Beth Ami, West Covina, California
Sponsor: Rep. James Lloyd (D-CA)
Date of Prayer: 4 April 1978

Mr. LLOYD of California, Mr. Speaker, I am very pleased to welcome a close friend, Dr. Henry E. Kraus, rabbi of Temple Beth Ami, West Covina, California, as today’s visiting clergyman. Rabbi Kraus was ordained at the Jewish Theological Seminary at Budapest, Hungary, with the highest rabbinical degrees and received his Ph.D. at the University of Budapest.

It was on this day, April 4, 1944, that he was forced by the Nazis to wear the Yellow Star of David as a sign of degradation. Along with his congregation, he was deported to Auschwitz and later, Buchenwald. The American 3d Army liberated him in 1945.

After the war, he became chief rabbi of western Hungary. Rabbi Kraus was one of the 12-member governing body of the Hungarian Jews, as well as one of the 7 members of the board of governors of the Jewish Theological Seminary of Budapest, where he lectured on the “practical rabbinate.” He also lectured at the universities on philosophy and ancient history and was a frequent speaker on Radio Budapest. He has authored a book and many articles. It was during the Hungarian revolution that he escaped and came to this country in January 1957.

A member of the Rabbinical Assembly, Rabbi Kraus served as one of the vice presidents of the assembly’s western region and is also a former president of the Los Angeles Eastern Area Board of Rabbis.

In 1975 the State of Israel honored him with the Ben Gurion Award—he was the first recipient of this award in California—and in June 1976 the Jewish Theological Seminary of America awarded him a doctor of divinity, honoris causa.

I feel we are honored to have him with us today, and would also like to welcome his family, who are here with us today.


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Contribute a translationSource (English)
I humbly ask God
to bless the work of your hands
and the thoughts of your minds.
May you establish justice
to bring peace to mankind.
I pray we will understand:
Eternity is not perpetual future,
but perpetual presence.”[1] A quote from Man Is Not Alone (1951) by Rabbi Dr. Abraham Joshua Heschel 
I quote the ancient prayer:
“May God who established peace in the High,
may He establish peace here in Earth.”[2] An adaptation of the liturgical prayer at the end of the Ḳaddish and the conclusion of the Amidah, “Oseh shalom bimromav.” 
Amen.

This prayer of the guest chaplain was offered in the fourth month of the second session of the 95th US Congress in the House of Representatives, and published in the Congressional Record, vol. 124, part 7 (1978), page 8626.

Source(s)

Congressional Record, vol. 124, part 7 (4 April 1978), p. 8626

 

Notes

Notes
1A quote from Man Is Not Alone (1951) by Rabbi Dr. Abraham Joshua Heschel
2An adaptation of the liturgical prayer at the end of the Ḳaddish and the conclusion of the Amidah, “Oseh shalom bimromav.”

 

 

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