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Prayer of the Guest Chaplain of the U.S. House of Representatives: Rabbi Jacob M. Sable on 25 February 1960

https://opensiddur.org/?p=54465 Prayer of the Guest Chaplain of the U.S. House of Representatives: Rabbi Jacob M. Sable on 25 February 1960 2024-02-25 15:28:59 The Opening Prayer given in the U.S. House of Representatives on 25 February 1960. Text the Open Siddur Project Jacob Sable Jacob Sable the Congressional Record of the United States of America https://opensiddur.org/copyright-policy/ Jacob Sable https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/ Opening Prayers for Legislative Bodies United States of America 86th Congress 20th century C.E. תחינות teḥinot 58th century A.M. English vernacular prayer U.S. House of Representatives Prayers of Guest Chaplains
Guest Chaplain: Rabbi Jacob M. Sable, Riverdale Jewish Center, Bronx, New York
Sponsor: n/a
Date of Prayer: 25 February 1960

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Contribute a translationSource (English)
Almighty God, Father of all men,
as the shadows of darkness
pass before the rays of heaven
and a new day of creation begins,
we invoke Thy blessings
upon the work of our hands
and the creative spirit of our minds.
Strengthen our will,
we pray Thee, Heavenly Father,
to do justly,
to love mercy,
and to walk humbly before Thee.
Guard our tongues from speaking evil
and our lips from speaking guile.[1] From the closing prayer of the Amidah, “Elohai netsor” 
Inspire us to perform good deeds
and righteous acts before Thee.
May the wisdom and courageous spirit
of our first President, George Washington,
ever serve as a lantern
to illumine the steps
of the dedicated men and women
who serve Thee in the Halls of Congress.
May his words, “to bigotry no sanction,
to persecution no assistance,”[2] From George Washington’s “Letter to the Jews of Newport,” August 17th, 1790. 
serve as a powerful citation of democracy.
May every Congressman and Congresswoman
be endowed with determination
to place righteousness above expediency.
Gird them with steadfastness and fortitude
to achieve freedom and progress for human society
and grant to all men
the spirit and the right
to live and work,
to think and speak,
in accordance with the dictates
of their good conscience.
Oh Lord,
grant them strength
and bless us
and all mankind
with Thy most precious gift,
peace.
Amen.

This prayer of the guest chaplain was offered in the second month of the second session of the 86th US Congress in the House of Representatives, and published in the Congressional Record, vol. 106, part 3 (1960), page 3483.

Source(s)

Congressional Record, vol. 106, part 3 (25 February 1960), p. 3483

 

Notes

Notes
1From the closing prayer of the Amidah, “Elohai netsor”
2From George Washington’s “Letter to the Jews of Newport,” August 17th, 1790.

 

 

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