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Prayer of the Guest Chaplain of the U.S. House of Representatives: Rabbi Louis M. Tuchman on 30 March 1982

https://opensiddur.org/?p=55136 Prayer of the Guest Chaplain of the U.S. House of Representatives: Rabbi Louis M. Tuchman on 30 March 1982 2024-03-29 19:38:13 The Opening Prayer given in the U.S. House of Representatives on 30 March 1982. Text the Open Siddur Project Aharon N. Varady (transcription) Aharon N. Varady (transcription) Louis M. Tuchman United States Congressional Record https://opensiddur.org/copyright-policy/ Aharon N. Varady (transcription) https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/ Opening Prayers for Legislative Bodies United States of America 20th century C.E. תחינות teḥinot 58th century A.M. English vernacular prayer U.S. House of Representatives Prayers of Guest Chaplains 97th Congress
Guest Chaplain: Rabbi Louis M. Tuchman, Congregation Agudas Achim, Peoria, Illinois
Sponsor: Rep. Bob Michel (R-IL)
Date of Prayer: 30 March 1982

Mr. MICHEL. Mr. Speaker, we are honored today to have the opening prayer delivered by Rabbi Louis M. Tuchman currently rabbi of Agudas Achim Congregation in Peoria.

While it would be impossible for me, in this short time, to list all his accomplishments, a capsule summary of his illustrious career in service to God and his fellow man would surely be appropriate.

A magna cum laude graduate of Yeshiva University, Rabbi Tuchman was ordained at the Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary of Yeshiva University.

He is assistant editor of Tradition, published by the Rabbinical Council of America and associate editor of the Rabbinical Council Manual as well as editor of the Rabbinical Council’s Proceedings.

In 1960, 1964, 1973, and 1977 he was chaplain and kashruth supervisor at the National Boy Scout Jamboree.

He is the recipient of the Shofar Award, the highest national award, in recognition of outstanding service in behalf of Jewish youth in the Boy Scouts of America.

His articles have appeared in many magazines, including Jewish Life and he has lectured at Duke University, Monmouth College, and at San Francisco State College.

Mr. Speaker, as I said, this brief list only begins to touch upon Rabbi Tuchman’s contributions to our national life. I am very proud to have this chance to introduce him to our colleagues.


TABLE HELP

Contribute a translationSource (English)
אָבִינוּ שֶׁבַּשָּׁמַיִם,
צוּר יִשְׂרָאֵל וְגוֹאֲלוֹ
Avinu shebashamayim
tzur Yisrael vegoalo.
[1] The first line of the Rabbi Yitsḥak haLevi Hertzog’s Prayer for the State of Israel (1948). 
 
Our Heavenly Father,
Supreme Architect of the Universe,
vouchsafe Thy benign blessings
upon the Members of this House of Representatives,
who have been assigned the responsibility
of guiding our great Nation.
Grant them, O Lord,
the wisdom and understanding
to labor for the well-being
of the United States of America
with zeal and with determination.
Today, amidst darkened skies,
may the glorious light of Thy countenance
shine forth brightly.
May we soon witness the day
when the ominous clouds
of evil and hatred
shall no longer flash athwart the skies,
and hope and loving kindness
will pierce the darkness
of fear and despair.

As we approach the month of freedom,
may the spirit of that day,
more than 200 years ago,
imbue this body and Nation
to continue to strive
for mankind’s beneficence,
well-being,
freedom,
and security.
Amen.


This prayer of the guest chaplain was offered in the third month of the second session of the 97th US Congress in the House of Representatives, and published in the Congressional Record, vol. 128, part 5 (1982), page 5881.

Source(s)

Congressional Record, vol. 128, part 5 (30 March 1982), p. 5881

Congressional Record, vol. 128, part 5 (30 March 1982), p. 5882

 

Notes

Notes
1The first line of the Rabbi Yitsḥak haLevi Hertzog’s Prayer for the State of Israel (1948).

 

 

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