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Prayer of the Guest Chaplain of the U.S. Senate: Rabbi Moshe Feller on 22 June 2004

https://opensiddur.org/?p=28183 Prayer of the Guest Chaplain of the U.S. Senate: Rabbi Moshe Feller on 22 June 2004 2019-11-19 15:01:56 The Opening Prayer given in the U.S. Senate on 22 June 2004. Text the Open Siddur Project United States Congressional Record United States Congressional Record Moshe Feller https://opensiddur.org/copyright-policy/ United States Congressional Record https://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/text/17/105 United States of America Opening Prayers for Legislative Bodies תחינות teḥinot 21st century C.E. 58th century A.M. English vernacular prayer Prayers of Guest Chaplains Senate Seven Noaḥide Laws ḤaBaD Lubavitch 108th Congress
Guest Chaplain: Rabbi Moshe Feller, of Saint Paul, Minnesota
Sponsor:
Date of Prayer: 2004-06-22

Contribute a translation Source (English)

Opening Prayer Given by the Guest Chaplain:

Almighty God,
Master of the Universe,
the Members of the U.S. Senate
convene here today
to fulfill one of the seven commandments
which You first issued to Noaḥ and his family
after the great flood,
the command to govern by just laws.

As related in the book of Genesis
and its sacred commentaries,
You issued at that time the following seven laws:[1] Sanhedrin 56a; cf. Tosefta Avodah Zarah 9:4 and Genesis Rabbah 34:8. The following litany of mitsvot follows the teaching of Maimonides: “Six items were commanded to Adam: concerning idolatry, blasphemy, bloodshed, illicit sexuality, theft, and laws…God added to Noah, the law of not eating from the flesh of a live animal.” (Mishneh Torah, Kings and Wars 9:1). For a full list of the mitsvot bnei Noaḥ, find “The Seven Commandments for All Humanity (Bnei Noaḥ) in early Rabbinic sources.” The impetus behind sharing the sheva mitsvot in the context of ḤaBaD Lubavitch originates with the following teaching of Rabbi Menachem Mendel Schneerson: “We must do everything possible to ensure that the seven Noahide laws are observed. If this can be accomplished through force or through other kinder and more peaceful means through explaining to non-Jews that they should accept God’s wishes [we should do so]…Anyone who is able to influence a non-Jew in any way to keep the seven commandments is obligated to do so, since that is what God commanded Moses our teacher,” (“Sheva Mitzvot Shel Benai Noach,” Hapardes 59:9 7-11, 5745).  

  1. To worship You alone;
  2. Never to blaspheme Your Holy Name;
  3. Not to commit murder;
  4. Not to commit adultery, incest, or any sexual misdeeds;
  5. Not to steal, lie or cheat;[2] A broad interpretation of gezel, taking without consent, i.e., theft. 
  6. Not to be cruel to any living creature;[3] A broad interpretation of ever min hê-ḥai, predatory behavior (literally, not [tearing] the limb of a living creature)  and
  7. That every society govern by just laws
    based on the recognition and acknowledgment of You, O God,
    as the sovereign ruler of all men and all nations.

Grant, Almighty God,
that the Members of the Senate
constantly realize
that in enacting just laws
they are performing your will.

Almighty God,
I beseech You today
to bless the Senate
and the entire Nation
in the merit of one of the spiritual giants
of our time and of our country,
the Lubavitcher Rebbe,
Rabbi Menachem Mendel Schneerson of righteous, blessed memory,
who passed away 10 years ago today.
The Rebbe labored
with great love,
dedication,
and self-sacrifice
to make all mankind aware of Your sacred presence.

May his memory be for a blessing,
and his merit be for a shield
for our Government and our country,
which he always referred to as
“a country of kindness.”

Amen.

Source(s)

108th Congress, 2nd Session
Issue: Vol. 150, No. 87 — Daily Edition (June 22, 2004)

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Notes

Notes
1 Sanhedrin 56a; cf. Tosefta Avodah Zarah 9:4 and Genesis Rabbah 34:8. The following litany of mitsvot follows the teaching of Maimonides: “Six items were commanded to Adam: concerning idolatry, blasphemy, bloodshed, illicit sexuality, theft, and laws…God added to Noah, the law of not eating from the flesh of a live animal.” (Mishneh Torah, Kings and Wars 9:1). For a full list of the mitsvot bnei Noaḥ, find “The Seven Commandments for All Humanity (Bnei Noaḥ) in early Rabbinic sources.” The impetus behind sharing the sheva mitsvot in the context of ḤaBaD Lubavitch originates with the following teaching of Rabbi Menachem Mendel Schneerson: “We must do everything possible to ensure that the seven Noahide laws are observed. If this can be accomplished through force or through other kinder and more peaceful means through explaining to non-Jews that they should accept God’s wishes [we should do so]…Anyone who is able to influence a non-Jew in any way to keep the seven commandments is obligated to do so, since that is what God commanded Moses our teacher,” (“Sheva Mitzvot Shel Benai Noach,” Hapardes 59:9 7-11, 5745).
2 A broad interpretation of gezel, taking without consent, i.e., theft.
3 A broad interpretation of ever min hê-ḥai, predatory behavior (literally, not [tearing] the limb of a living creature)
 

 

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