A Prayer for Compassion During Violent Conflict, by Trisha Arlin

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Barukh Atah Adonai
Brukhah At Shekhinah
Blessed One-ness, Blessed Connection,
Kadosh Barukh Hu:
We pray for all who are in pain
And all who cause pain.

We pray for those of us
Who are so angry
That we have lost compassion for the suffering
Of anyone who is not a member of our group.
And we pray for those of us
Who cannot see the suffering
Behind the loss of that compassion.

We pray for the strength
To resist the urge to inhumanity
That we feel in times of fear and mourning.
We pray for the courage
To resist the calls to inhumanity
That others may make upon us in times of crisis.

Barukh Atah Adonai
Brukhah At Shekhinah
Blessed One-ness, Blessed Connection,
Kadosh Barukh Hu:
May we find relief from our hurts and fears
And may we not, in our pain,
Lose our empathy
For the hurts and fears of others.
We pray for all who are in pain
And all who cause pain.
Amen

This prayer was first published as “A Prayer for Suffering,” by Trisha Arlin at her liturgy blog, Trisha Arlin: Words of Prayer & Intention. “A Prayer for Suffering,” was subsequently discovered by writers from the NBC mini-series A.D. The Bible Continues (s01e04) and included without attribution or adoption of the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike license under which the prayer was shared. After this matter was raised with the network, the sequence in which the prayer appeared was removed from the episode of the show.

1 comment to A Prayer for Compassion During Violent Conflict, by Trisha Arlin

  • Via the Open Source Judaism Facebook page:

    This past week, the NBC mini-series, A.D. The Bible Continues, appropriated a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike licensed prayer written by Trisha Arlin, an open-source Jewish liturgist whose work we often mention here, without providing any attribution to Arlin or contacting her for permission outside the terms of the copyleft license. “I’m very flattered that they used it,” Arlin said. “I think it’s a good prayer too! It’s one that I’m proud of. It’s too bad it was taken without permission and used without attribution or payment, but it’s flattering.”

    http://www.patheos.com/blogs/filmchat/2015/05/did-a-d-the-bible-continues-plagiarize-a-modern-prayer.html

    Aharon Varady, founding director of The Open Siddur Project​ and co-founder of the Jewish Free-Culture Society writes:

    “I advised Trisha to adopt the CC BY-SA license for her work and recommended to her the language by which her liturgy could be shared on her website. While I explained that her license permits commercial use, it only permits such use so long as the terms of the copyleft are adopted, which NBC clearly did not, in her circumstance. This incident undermines the integrity of the license which I urge Jewish scholars and liturgists to adopt in order for other communities to freely share and adapt prayers, art, research, and educational resources.”

    As derivative works must be shared under this same CC BY-SA license, we feel no problem at all sharing this short clip documenting the use of the prayer in this episode:
    https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=1444068282557335

    The Internet Archive’s wayback machine made a copy of this prayer in 2014, here:
    https://web.archive.org/web/20141221001144/http://triganza.blogspot.com/2014/07/a-prayer-for-suffering.html

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