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אֲדוֹן עוֹלָם (ספרד)‏ | Adon Olam, rhyming translation by Rabbi David de Sola Pool (1937)

Source (Hebrew) Translation (English)

אֲדוֹן עוֹלָם אֲשֶׁר מָלַךְ
בְּטֶֽרֶם כׇּל־יְצִיר נִבְרָא׃
Creation’s Lord! He ruled from aye
Ere yet created form was made.

לְעֵת נַֽעֲשָׂה כְּחֶפְצוֹ כֹּל
אֲזַי מֶֽלֶךְ שְׁמוֹ נִקְרָא׃
What time He willed this world to be,
Then homage to His rule was paid.

וְאַֽחֲרֵי כִּכְלּוֹת הַכֹּל
לְבַדּוֹ יִמְלֹךְ נוֹרָא׃
And when all things shall cease to be,
Alone His awe shall be displayed.

וְהוּא הָיָה וְהוּא הֹוֶה
וְהוּא יִֽהְיֶה בְּתִפְאֲרָה׃
He was. He is. He e’er shall be
In glory that can never fade.

וְהוּא אֶחָד וְאֵין שֵׁנִי
לְהַמְשִׁיל לוֹ לְהַחְבִּירָה׃
Unique, alone, without compare
Is He by whom all else was made.

בְּלִי רֵאשִׁית בְּלִי תַּכְלִית
וְלוֹ הָעֹז וְהַמִּשְׂרָה׃
Without beginning, without end;
His might. His rule, must be obeyed.

בְּלִי עֵֽרֶךְ בְּלִי דִמְיוֹן
בְּלִי שִׁנּוּי וְהַתְּמוּרָה׃
Without compare, unchanging He
Whose thoughts infinity pervade.

בְּלִי חִבּוּר בְּלִי פֵרוּד
גְּדׇל־כֹּחַ וְהַגְּבוּרָה׃
Without associate, complete,
In might supreme He is arrayed.

וְהוּא אֵלִי וְחַי גּֽוֹאֲלִי
וְצוּר חֶבְלִי בְּיוֹם צָרָה׃
He is my God, my living hope
In troubled hour, my rock, my aid,

וְהוּא נִסִּי וּמָנוֹס לִי
מְנָת כּוֹסִי בְּיוֹם אֶקְרָא׃
My banner, refuge, portion true,
My guide to whom my prayer is prayed.

בְּיָדוֹ אַפְקִיד רוּחִי
בְּעֵת אִישַׁן וְאָעִֽירָה׃
I rest my spirit in His hand;
Asleep, awake, by Him I’m stayed.

וְעִם רוּחִי גְּוִיָּתִי
אֲדֹנָי לִי וְלֹא אִירָא׃
My body and my soul with God,
I face my future unafraid.

Adon Olam is a piyyut that became popular in the 15th century and is often attributed to Solomon ibn Gabirol (1021–1058) and less often to Sherira Gaon (900-1001), or his son, Hai ben Sherira Gaon (939-1038). The variation of the piyyut appearing here is the 12 line version familiar to Sepharadi congregations. (There are also fifteen and sixteen line variants found in Sepharadi siddurim. The Ashkenazi version has ten lines.) The translation appearing here was transcribed from Rabbi David de Sola Pool’s maḥzor for Rosh haShanah (1937).

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