Exact matches only
//  Main  //  Menu

 
☰︎ Menu | 🔍︎ Search  //  Main  //   🖖︎ Prayers & Praxes   //   🌞︎ Prayers for the weekday, Shabbat, and season   //   Everyday   //   Daytime   //   Morning Baqashot   //   אֲדוֹן עוֹלָם (אשכנז)‏ | Adōn Olam (rhyming translation by Jessie Ethel Sampter, 1917)

אֲדוֹן עוֹלָם (אשכנז)‏ | Adōn Olam (rhyming translation by Jessie Ethel Sampter, 1917)

https://opensiddur.org/?p=51567 אֲדוֹן עוֹלָם (אשכנז)‏ | Adōn Olam (rhyming translation by Jessie Ethel Sampter, 1917) 2023-06-11 16:24:03 <em>Adon Olam</em> is a piyyut that became popular in the 15th century and is often attributed to Solomon ibn Gabirol (1021–1058) and less often to Sherira Gaon (900-1001), or his son, Hai ben Sherira Gaon (939-1038). The variation of the piyyut appearing here is the 10 line version familiar to Ashkenazi congregations. (There are also twelve, fifteen, and sixteen line variants found in Sepharadi siddurim.) The rhyming translation here by Jessie Ethel Sampter was transcribed from Joseph Friedlander and George Alexander Kohut's <em>The standard book of Jewish verse</em> (1917), p. 394. Text the Open Siddur Project Aharon N. Varady (transcription) Aharon N. Varady (transcription) Jessie Ethel Sampter Shlomo ibn Gabirol https://opensiddur.org/copyright-policy/ Aharon N. Varady (transcription) https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/ Arvit l'Shabbat Morning Baqashot Bedtime Shema Musaf l'Shabbat 20th century C.E. פיוטים piyyutim 57th century A.M. cosmological 11th century C.E. 49th century A.M. rhyming translation אדון עולם Adon Olam
TABLE HELP

Source (Hebrew)Translation (English)
אֲדוֹן עוֹלָם אֲשֶׁר מָלַךְ
בְּטֶֽרֶם כׇּל־יְצִיר נִבְרָא׃
לְעֵת נַֽעֲשָׂה כְּחֶפְצוֹ כֹּל
אֲזַי מֶֽלֶךְ שְׁמוֹ נִקְרָא׃
The everlasting Lord who reigned
Ere yet was formed or shape or thing,
When all was made as he decreed
Was even then acknowledged King.
וְאַֽחֲרֵי כִּכְלּוֹת הַכֹּל
לְבַדּוֹ יִמְלֹךְ נוֹרָא׃
וְהוּא הָיָה וְהוּא הֹוֶה
וְהוּא יִֽהְיֶה בְּתִפְאֲרָה׃
And after all that is shall end,
Alone shall reign the feared one — He
In his resplendence glorious
Who was, who is, and who will be.
וְהוּא אֶחָד וְאֵין שֵׁנִי
לְהַמְשִׁיל לוֹ לְהַחְבִּירָה׃
בְּלִי רֵאשִׁית בְּלִי תַּכְלִית
וְלוֹ הָעֹז וְהַמִּשְׂרָה׃
And He is one and there is none,
No second to compare or share —
Without beginning, without end —
In his dominion everywhere.
וְהוּא אֵלִי וְחַי גּֽוֹאֲלִי
וְצוּר חֶבְלִי בְּיוֹם צָרָה׃
וְהוּא נִסִּי וּמָנוֹס לִי
מְנָת כּוֹסִי בְּיוֹם אֶקְרָא׃
He is my God — my helper lives —
My rock when grievous times befall,
My banner He, my refuge He,
And my cup’s portion, when I call.
בְּיָדוֹ אַפְקִיד רוּחִי
בְּעֵת אִישַׁן וְאָעִֽירָה׃
וְעִם רוּחִי גְּוִיָּתִי
אֲדֹנָי לִי וְלֹא אִירָא׃
Within His hand I trust my soul
In sleep and waking — He is near —
And with my soul, my body, too:
The Lord’s with me; I have no fear.

Adon Olam is a piyyut that became popular in the 15th century and is often attributed to Solomon ibn Gabirol (1021–1058) and less often to Sherira Gaon (900-1001), or his son, Hai ben Sherira Gaon (939-1038). The variation of the piyyut appearing here is the 10 line version familiar to Ashkenazi congregations. (There are also twelve, fifteen, and sixteen line variants found in Sepharadi siddurim.) The rhyming translation here by Jessie Ethel Sampter was transcribed from Joseph Friedlander and George Alexander Kohut’s The standard book of Jewish verse (1917), p. 394.

Source(s)

Loading

 


 

 

Comments, Corrections, and Queries