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מְגִילַּת הִיטְלֶיר | Megillat Hitler, a Purim Sheni scroll for French Armistice Day by Asher P. Ḥassine (Casablanca, 1944)

The editor has translated and cantillated several Purim Sheni scrolls before, including Megilat Saragossa and Megilat Fustat. Both of these have included a translator’s note that begins “Combining the candy and costumes of Halloween, the plays and parades of Mardi Gras, the mischief and masquerades of April Fools’ Day, and more booze than you can wobble your fist at…” This one is different.

Megilat Hitler (yes, that Hitler) was written by Prosper Ḥassin (later known as Asher Ḥassin, MK for Mapai from 1959—1969), a Moroccan Jew and Hebraist who lived through the horrors of the Vichy regime and sought to write a scroll commemorating the defeat of the Axis forces in Africa. It is purposely in the style of the Megillah of Esther, as Ḥassin explains in his introduction, included below, where he clarifies that it is intended to be read in the manner of the actual Megillah of Esther.

The Jewish community of North Africa suffered greatly under Vichy rule, but since the Axis was largely pushed out of Africa by May 1943 this scroll was written in that year, meaning that Hitler was still in power when it was published. This leads to some unique aspects: the last chapter rephrases the words of Zeresh to Haman into a prophecy of the Nazis’ ultimate defeat. As a Labor Zionist, Ḥassin’s relationship to divinity was complicated, and this is most clearly seen in chapter four, where Mordechai’s proclamation that “support and rescue will come for the Jews from another place” (the most blatantly faith-based passage in the entire Megillah) is replaced with the far more cynical and humanist take that “support and rescue will come from nowhere else for the Jews.”

Now Ḥassin wrote that he wished this scroll to be read in the actual manner of the Megillah of Esther, but considering what was not yet known about the horrific extent of Shoah this seems perhaps trite, or at least questionable. If it’s read in Megillah cantillation, perhaps it should be read in a different manner — slower, more contemplative, and less jubilant. And perhaps we could be more liberal with the use of Eikha motifs.


Source (Hebrew) Translation (English)

הקדמה
Introduction

זְמַן רַב חִפַּשְׁתִּי לִמְצֹא תְּנוּעוּת כְּדֵי שֶׁכׇּל־מִי־שֶׁהוּא מִבְּנֵי יִשְׂרָאֵל יוּכַל לַהֲגוּת בִּמְגִלָּה זוֹ לְהַכִּיר עֶרְכָּהּ וְלָדַעַת מִמַּה נִּצַּלְנוּ וּמָה עוֹבֵר עַל אַחֵינוּ הַפְּזוּרִים אַךְ לַשָּׁוְא יָגַעְתִּי כִּי בְּכׇל־בָּתֵּי הַדְּפוּס שֶׁל מָארוֹקוֹ אֵין תִּנוּעוּת. לָכֶם קוֹרְאִים יְקָרִים אֲנִי מַזְהִיר לְקׇורְאָהּ בָּשׂוּם לֵב בִּשְׁבִיל שֶׁלֹא תְּשַׁנּוּ מִבְטָא הָאוֹתִיּוֹת וּבָזֶה יִשְׁתַּנֶּה גַּם הַבֵּאוּר. בְּהַרְבֵּה מִלּוֹת יֵשׁ אֵיזֶה אוֹתִיּוֹת יִתֵרוֹת, כׇּל־זֶה עָשִׂיתִי רַק בִּשְׁבִיל לְהָקֵל קְרִיאָתָהּ. חוֹשֵׁב אֲנִי כִּי חוֹבָה עָלֵינוּ לֹקְרוֹא מְגִלָּה זוֹ בְּכׇל־שָׁנָה וְשָנָה בְּאַחַד עָשָׂר לְנוֹבֵאמבֶּר וְלָחֹג פּוּרים קָטָן שֶׁאַחֲרֵי שֶׁתִּגָּמֵר הַמִּלְחָמָה נִקְבָּע אוֹתוֹ לְפוּרִים גָּדוֹל. הַמְּגִלָּה הַזֹּאת לֹא לִמְגִלַּת הִתּוּלִים וּצְחוֹק תֵּחָשֶׁב כִּי אִם לִמְגִלָּה רְצִינִית מְגִלָּה מַמָּשׁ. כִּי עַל־פִּי סִגְנוֹנָהּ יָכוֹלִים אַתֶּם לְהַכִּיר שֶׁהִיא מֻושְׁפָּעָה מִמְּגִלַּת אֶסְתֵּר שֶׁלָּנוּ וְלָכֵן צָרִיךְ לִקְרוֹתָהּ בְּנִגּוּן כְּנִגּוּן מְגִלַּת אֶסְתֵּר.
For a long time I have sought to find impetus that all who are of the children of Israel may recite this text, to understand its worth and to know how we won and what happened to our exiled brothers, but in vain did I toil, since there was no impetus in any of the publishing houses of Morocco. To you, my dear readers, I caution you to read it wholeheartedly, that you not change the accentuation of the letters, since from this the meaning will also be changed. In many words there are some capital letters, all of which I made solely to help with ease of reading. I think it is mandatory for us to read this Megillah every year after year on the eleventh of November, and to celebrate a small Purim, and after this war is ended we may set it as a great Purim! This scroll should not be considered a scroll of comedy and laughter, but a serious, real scroll, since according to its style you can understand that it is influenced by our own Scroll of Esther, and thus it must be read in a melody like the melody of the Scroll of Esther.

הֶעָרָה בְּאֶמְצַע הַמְּגִלָּה כָּתוּב ׳׳וַיַּרְא הִיטְלֶיר כִּי בְּחֹדֶשׁ כִּסְלֵיו אֵבֶל גָּדוֹל הָיָה לַיְּהוּדִים׃׳׳ מֶה הָיָה? מֵת רַבֵּנוּ הַקָּדוֹשׁ מֵת אֱלִיעֶזֶר בֶּן יְהוּדָה מֵת הַסּוֹפֵר הַגָּדוֹל יַעֲקֹב אָשֵׁר אַבְּרָמוֹבִיץ וְעוֹד הַרְבֵּה סוֹפְרִים וַחֲכָמִים מֵתוּ בַּחֹדֶשׁ הַזֶּה אֲבָל לֹא זוֹהִי כַּוָּנַת הִיטְלֶיר הָאָרוּר כִּי אִם מָצָאתִי עַל מַה לִּסְמוֹךְ וְסָמַכְתִּי.
A note in the middle of the scroll says: “And Hitler saw that in the month of Kislev was great mourning for the Jews.” What happened? Our holy rabbi[1] Yehuda haNasi  died,[2] on 15 Kislev  Eliezer ben Yehuda died,[3] on 26 Kislev  the great author Yaakov Abramovich[4] AKA Mendele Moykher-Sforim. Mendele is well known today for his Yiddish writing, but he was also a major figure in the revitalization of Hebrew as a literary language, thus his citation by a proud Hebraist like Asher P. Ḥassin.  died,[5] on 23 Kislev  and many other authors and sages died on in that month. Although that wasn’t the intention of the accursed Hitler, I had to find something to base it on, and I based it on it.

בְּנֵי הָמָן שֶׁמֵּתוּ הֵם שְׁנֵים עָשָׂר הַקְּצִינִים שֶׁנֶּאֶסְרוּ בְּאַפְרִיקָא. כַּאֲשֶׁר תַּתְחִילוּ הַקְּרִיאָה וְתִשְׁמְעוּ שְׁמוֹת הָאֲרוּרִים תַּכּוּ וּתְצַוּוּ לִבְנֵיכֶם לְהַרְעִישׁ בָּרַעֲשָׁנִים כְּמוֹ שֶׁעוֹשִׂים בִּקְרִיאַת מְגִלַּת אֶסְתֵּר (וּבָזֶה יִמָּחֶה שֵׁם עֲמָלֵק זֶה שֶׁנִּשְׁאַר תַּחַת הַשָּׁמַיִם).
The sons of Haman who died are the twelve captains who were imprisoned in Africa. When you start the reading and hear the names of the cursed ones, hit something and instruct your children to make noise with noisemakers just as they do in the reading of Esther (and thus this name of Amalek which remains shall be blotted out under heaven.)

הַמְּחַבֵּר פ׳ חָסִין מוֹרֶה לְעִבְרִית.
Compiled by P. Ḥassine, Hebrew teacher.

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה אָבִֽינוּ הַמְּרַחֵם תָּמִיד עָלֵֽינוּ וּמַכְרִֽיעַ אוֹיְבֵֽינוּ תַּחְתֵּֽנוּ שֶׁזִכִּיתָֽנוּ לִקְרֹא מְגִלָּה׃
Blessed are You, our Parent, who constantly has mercy upon us, and crushes our enemies below us, and merited us to read the Megillah.
Chapter 1

א וַיְהִ֡י בִּימֵ֣י ׀ הִיטְלֶ֣יר הַצַּבָּ֗ע ה֚וּא הַקָּ֣אפּוֹרָ֔אל הַמּוֹשֵׁ֖ל עַ֣ל־כׇּל־גֶּרְמָ֑נְיָא שְׁבַ֥ע עֶשְׂרֵ֖ה מְדִינֽוֹת׃ ב בַּיָּמִ֖ים הָהֵ֑ם בַּעֲל֣וֹת ׀ הָאַכְזָ֣ר הַזֶּ֗ה עַ֚ל כִּסֵּ֣א מֶמְשַׁלְתּ֔וֹ אֲשֶׁ֖ר בְּבֶרְלִ֥ין הַבִּירָֽה׃ ג שָׁכַ֣ח עָנְי֔וֹ וְד֥וּד הַצְּבָעִ֖ים שֶׁהָיָ֣ה עַל־שִׁכְמ֑וֹ לֶ֣חֶם עוֹנִ֗י וּבְגָדִ֤ים קְרוּעִים֙ וְחַצְר֣וֹת הַבָּתִּ֔ים שֶׁשָׁ֖ם הָ֥יָה לָֽן׃ ד זָכוֹר֩ לֹ֨א זָכַ֜ר יְמֵ֣י הַצּוֹם֮ וְחַיֵּ֣י נְדוּדִים֒ בַּיּוֹם֙ אֲכָלָ֣הוּ חֹרֶ֔ב וְקֶ֖רַח בַּלָּ֑יְלָה וַאֲנָשִׁ֥ים טוֹבִ֖ים לְבֵיתָ֥ם סְחָפֽוּהוּ׃ ה גַּ֧ם הָאֲנָשִׁ֛ים הַדָּלִּ֥ים אוֹת֖וֹ רִחַ֑מוּ וְחֶמְלָ֤ה זוֹ֙ הִ֣יא לָמַ֔ד וַיִּתְאַכְזֵ֛ר וַיִּשְׁמַ֥ן וַיִבְעַ֖ט כַּחֲזִֽיר׃ ו מִסְפַּ֣ר צָרוֹתָ֣יו הָרַבּ֣וֹת שָׁכַח֮ וּמִלִּבּ֣וֹ הֱסִירָן֒ וְנִקְמַ֣ת אֲבוֹתָ֡יו הָמָ֣ן וַעֲמָלֵק֩ יִמַּ֨ח שְׁמ֤וֹ כִּשְׁמָם֙ זָכַ֔ר וְעַל־לִבּ֖וֹ חֲרָטָ֑הּ רָאָ֥ה הַהַתְחָלָ֖ה וְנִסְתַּמָּ֥א לְבַסּֽוֹף׃ ז אָמַ֣ר בְּלִבּ֔וֹ זְקֵנַ֤י נוצחו [נֻצְּחוּ֙] מִמִּע֣וּט חׇכְמָתָ֔ם וַאֲנִ֛י אִ֥ישׁ דַּ֖עַת וּמָלֵ֣א תְּבוּנָ֑ה עֲצָתִ֤י נְכוֹנָה֙ וּזְרוֹעִ֣י חֲזָקָ֔ה וּבָזֶ֛ה אֶכְבֹּ֖שׁ אֶת־כׇּל־הַעוֹלָֽם׃ ח וּמַ֨ה נָּאו֤וּ עַל־זֶה֙ דִּבְרֵ֣י הַסּוֹפֵ֔ר שֶׁ֖אָמַ֑ר גַּאֲוָה֙ מוּטֶ֣לֶת בָּאַשְׁפָּ֔ה כׇּל־הָרוֹצֶה֙ בָּ֣א וְנוֹטְלָ֔הּ מִשָּׁ֥ם לֹ֖קְטָה הָרַ֥ע הַזֶּֽה׃ ט וַיְּלַמֵ֥ד לְשׁוֹנ֖וֹ לְדַבֵּ֣ר עׇרְמ֑וֹת וַיַּגְזֵ֣ים וַיְּשַׁקֵּ֗ר בּ֤וֹר כָּרָה֙ וַיַּחְפְּרֵ֔הוּ וַיִּפֹּ֖ל בְּשַׁ֣חַת עָשָֽׂה׃ י בַּשָׁנָ֤ה הָרִאשׁוֹנָה֙ לְמׇשְׁל֔וֹ עָשָׂ֣ה מִשְׁתֶּ֔ה לְנָזָ֖יו וּלְכׇל־רֵעָ֑יו חֵ֣יל גֶּרְמָ֗נְיָא הַנָּאזִ֧ים הָאַכְזָרִ֛ים וּגְדוֹלֵ֥י הַפָֿאסִ֖יסְת אֲשֶׁ֥ר לְפָנָֽיו׃ יא לְהַרְאוֹת֩ לָהֶ֨ם אֶת־גֹּ֤דֶל כְּבוֹדוֹ֙ וְתִפְאַרְתּ֔וֹ וְאֶת־יְקַ֥ר גְּדֻלָּת֖וֹ וְרֹ֣ב חׇכְמָת֑וֹ וּמִסְפַּר֙ אֲנָשָׁ֔יו וְנִשְׁקָ֥ם הָרַ֖ב כְּח֥וֹל הַיָּֽם׃ יב וְאַחֲרֵ֣י ׀ הַיָּמִ֣ים הָאֵ֗לֶּה עָשָׂ֣ה הַכּוֹבֵ֡שׁ לְכׇל־הָעָ֣ם הַנִּמְצָאִים֩ בְּבֶרְלִ֨ין הַבִּירָ֜ה לְמִגָּד֧וֹל וְעַד־קָטָ֛ן מִשְׁתֶּ֖ה י֣וֹם אֶחָ֑ד בַּחֲצַ֕ר גִּנַּ֥ת בִּיתַ֖ן הַמּוֹשֵֽׁל׃ יג בָּתִּ֛ים גְּדוֹלִ֥ים וּרְחָבִ֖ים הֵכִ֣ין לְאוֹרְחָ֑יו דִּיר֤וֹת נֶהְדָּרוֹת֙ וּבְרָהִיטִ֣ים מקושטות [מְקֻשָּׁט֔וֹת] וּמִטּ֥וֹת מוצעות [מֻצָּע֖וֹת] עַל־רִצְפַּ֥ת שַֽׁיִשׁ׃ יד וְהַשְּׁתִיָּ֣ה כַּדָ֔ת בְּכֵ֖לִים מִכֵּלִ֣ים שׁוֹנִ֑ים וְיֵ֥ין הַמֶּמְשָׁלָ֛ה רַ֖ב כִּיַ֥ד הַמּוֹשֵֽׁל׃ טו וַיִּשְׁתּ֤וּ הַגֶּרְמָנִים֙ לִרְוָיָ֔ה וַיִּשְׂמַ֖ח לְבָבָ֑ם וַתִּגְדַּ֧ל הָרְנָנָ֛ה בְּכׇל־גֶּרְמָ֖נְיָא בֵּ֥ין הַנָּאזִֽים׃ טז גַּ֧ם אִיטָ֛אלְיָא עָשְׂתָ֖ה מִשְׁתֵּ֣ה נָאזִ֑ים בֵּ֚ית הַמַּלְכ֔וּת אֲשֶׁ֖ר לַמֶּ֥לֶךְ עִמָּנוּאֵֽל׃ יז בַּיּ֣וֹם הַשֵּׁנִ֔י כְּטוֹב־לֵ֥ב הִיטְלֶ֖יר עָלָ֑יו אָמַ֡ר לְגוֹרִינְג֩ גּוֹבֶּ֨ילְס ריבנטרופ [רִיבֶּנְטְר֜וֹףְּ] בּ֤וֹךְ לַיי֙ הֵ֣יץ וְהִמְלֶ֔יר שִׁבְעַת֙ הַסָּ֣רִיסִ֔ים אֲשֶׁ֖ר לַמּוֹשֵׁ֥ל הִיטְלֶֽיר׃ יח כְּדָת֙ מַ֣ה לַּעֲשׂ֔וֹת בָּעָ֥ם הַיְּהוּדִ֖י הַזֶּ֑ה שֶֽׁהִשְׁמִ֣יד אֲבוֹתֵ֗ינוּ וְעָשָׂ֤ה בָּהֵם֙ כָּלָ֔ה וְאֶת־דָּתֵ֙ינוּ֙ אֵינָ֣ם עוֹשִׂ֔ים וְאוֹתָ֖נוּ הֵ֥ם שׂוֹנְאִֽים׃ יט וַיֹּ֣אמֶר הִימְלֶיר֩ לִפְנֵ֨י הַמּוֹשֵׁ֜ל וְהַשָּׂרִ֗ים לֹא־רַ֤ק אוֹתָ֙נוּ֙ לְבַדֵּ֔נוּ שׂוֹנֵ֖א הָעָ֥ם הַזֶּֽה׃ כ גַּ֕ם הַאִיטַאלְקִ֥ים הַפָֿאסִ֖יסְת חֲבֵרֵ֑ינוּ ה֥וּא שׂוֹנֵ֖א וְכׇל־אַנְשֵׁ֥י בְּרִיתֵּֽנוּ׃ כא אִ֤ם עַל־הַמּוֹשֵׁל֙ ט֔וֹב יֵצֵא֩ דָּבָ֨ר כִּדְבַ֤ר הַמַּלְכוּת֙ מִלְּפָנָ֔יו וְיִכָּתֵ֧ב בְּדָתֵ֛י הַנָּאזִ֥ים וְהַפָֿאסִ֖יסְת וְלֹ֣א יַעֲב֑וֹר לְעַנּ֥וֹת הָעָ֛ם הַיְּהוּדִ֥י הַזֶּ֖ה בְּעִנּוּיִ֥ים קָשִֽׁים׃ כב גַּ֨ם נַחְרִ֤ב בֵּיתָיו֙ וְנִשְׂרֹ֣ף כְּנֵסִיּוֹתָ֔יו נַהֲרֹ֛ג נַ֥עַר וְזָקֵ֖ן אַף־טַ֑ף וּבָזֶ֖ה נִנְקֹ֥ם נִקְמָתֵֽנוּ׃ כג וְלַנּוֹתָ֤ר נַלְבִּישׁ֙ א֣וֹת קָל֔וֹן נַעֲבִידֵ֖ם עֲבוֹדָ֣ה פָּ֑רֶךְ וְכָ֕כָה יִכְלֶ֖ה הָעָ֥ם הַזֶּֽה׃ כד וַיִּיטַב֙ הַדָּבָ֔ר בְּעֵינֵ֥י הַמּוֹשֵׁ֖ל וְהַשָּרִ֑ים וַיַּ֥עַשׂ הִיטְלֶ֖יר כִּדְבַ֥ר הִימְלֶֽיר׃ כה וַיִּשְׁלַ֨ח סְפָרִ֜ים אֶל־כׇּל־הֶעָ֣רִים וְהַמְּדִינוֹת֮ שֶׁה֣וּא מוֹשֵׁ֣ל עֲלֵיהֶן֒ לִהְי֨וֹת כׇּל־גֶּרְמָנִ֤י נָאזִי֙ שׂוֹרֵ֣ר בְּבֵ֔יתוֹ מְדַבֵּ֖ר רַ֣ק בִּשְׂפָת֑וֹ מְבַזֶּ֧ה מְיַסֵּ֛ר מַכְאִ֥יב וְרוֹמֵ֖ס כׇּל־הַיְּהוּדִ֥ים שְׁכֵנָֽיו׃ כו וַיִּשָּׁמַ֨ע פִּתְגַּ֤ם הַמּוֹשֵׁל֙ אֲשֶׁ֣ר אָמַ֔ר בְּכׇל־עָרֵ֣י מֶמְשַׁלְתּ֔וֹ כִּ֥י רַבָּ֖ה הִ֑יא וּבָכֹּ֗ל הַגֶּרְמָנִ֤ים הַנָּאזִים֙ שָׁמְע֣וּ לַעֲצָת֔וֹ וַיכַבְּד֛וּ בְּמַהֲלוּמ֥וֹת הַיְּהוּדִ֖ים שְׁכֵנֵֽיהֶם׃ כז וַיַּהַרְג֤וּ בַּחֶ֙רֶב֙ אֲנָשִׁ֣ים וּנְעָרִ֔ים וַיָּמִ֥יתוּ בָּרָעָ֖ב זָקֵ֣ן וָטַ֑ף וַיְעַנּוּ֙ הֶהָר֔וֹת וַיִּרְמְס֖וּ הַבָּנִֽים׃ כח וַיִּתְּנ֥וּ עֲלֵיהֶ֖ם עֲבוֹד֣וֹת קָשׁ֑וֹת וַיְגָרְשׁוּם֙ מִבָּ֣תֵּיהֶ֔ם וַיִּגְזְל֥וּ מָמוֹנָ֖ם וַיִּשְׁבּ֥וּ אֶת־שִׁבְיָֽם׃ כט וַיַּתְחִ֣ילוּ הַיְּהוּדִ֗ים לִבְר֙וֹחַ֙ מֵחֲמַ֣ת הָאוֹיְבִ֔ים וַיַּ֤עַזְבוּ כֹּל֙ אֲשֶׁ֣ר לָהֶ֔ם וַיֵּלְכ֥וּ שֶׁ֖בִי לִפְנֵ֣י צַ֑ר וַחֲמַ֥ת הִיטְלֶ֖יר לֹ֥א שָׁכָֽכָה׃
1 And it was in the days of Hitler the painter, he was the corporal who dictated over all Germany, seventeen provinces. 2 In those days, when that villain rose to the dictatorial seat in Berlin the capital. 3 He forgot his poverty and the paint-cauldrons he would have on his shoulders, the poor man’s bread and torn clothes and house courtyards where he would stay. 4 He did not remember the days without food and the life of wandering — in the day the sword consumed him, and ice by night, and good people would sweep him to their house. 5 And the poor people would have compassion on him, and this kindness he learned, and he grew villainous and waxed fat like a pig. 6 The great number of his troubles he forgot and removed from his heart, and the vengeance of Haman and Amalek[6] The first of many references to the idea that the Nazis are descendants of Amalek through Agag, Haman’s people. This could be taken as metaphorical, since Amalek is often used as a representation for genocidal evil. It could also be taken as a literal claim that the Nazis are descendants of Amalek, or at the very least showed extreme sympathies towards the Amalekites as the victims of Jewish violence. One Nazi who can be said to have referenced this idea was Adolf Hitler. “In a speech by Hitler on January 30, 1944, he said that, if the Nazis went down to defeat, the Jews could celebrate ‘a second triumphant Purim’” (as quoted in “The Prophecy of Hitler,” in The Purim Anthology, ed. Philip Goodman, JPS 1949).  (may his names be blotted out like theirs) he remembered and engraved on his heart, he saw the start and was blinded to the end. 7 He said in his heart, “My elders were defeated out of their lack of wisdom, but I am a knowledgeable man full of understanding, my counsel is correct and my hand is strong, and with this I will conquer the whole world.” 8 And how welcome regarding this are the words of the writer[7] The translator is uncertain as to the source of this quote. Anyone who recognizes the quote and can identify the writer, please leave a comment!  who said: “Pride is fallen in the trash-heap, all who want come and take it, from there pick up this evil.” 9 And he taught his tongue to speak schemes, and he exaggerated and lied, he dug a pit and cut it out, and will fall in the hole he made. 10 In the first year of his dictatorship, he made a feast for his Nazis and for all his fellows, the army of Germany, the villainous Nazis, and the chiefs of the fascists that were before him, 11 to show them the greatness of his glory and splendor, and the honor of his greatness and great wisdom, and the number of his people and their measure as great as the sand of the sea. 12 And after these things, the oppressor of all the people found in Berlin the capitol from oldest to youngest made a one-day feast in the courtyard of the palace garden of the dictator. 13 Great and wide houses he set up for his guests, beautiful apartments and in straight rafters and spread beds on a pavement of alabaster. 14 And the drinking was by rule, in many different cups, and the dictatorial wine was great per the hand of the dictator. 15 And the Germans drank well, and their hearts were gladdened, and the cheers grew louder in all Germany among the Nazis. 16 Also, Italy had a feast for the Nazis in the royal palace of King Emmanuel.[8] Victor Emmanuel III, king of Italy during the fascist period  17 On the second day, when Hitler’s heart was good, he said to Goering,[9] Hermann Goering, grand marshal of the Wehrmacht  Goebbels,[10] Joseph Goebbels, minister of propaganda  Ribbentrop,[11] Joachim von Ribbentrop, minister of foreign affairs  Bock,[12] Unclear. Ephraim Ḥazan and Raḥel Ḥitin-Mashiaḥ, in their work “The Hitler Scroll — on the miracle and rescue of North African Jews in World War II“ (which has been very useful to the translator) suggest Fedor von Bock, general field marshal.  Ley,[13] Robert Ley, head of the German Labor Front  and Himmler,[14] Heinrich Himmler, head of the SS  the seven officers of the dictator Hitler. 18 To the matter of what to do with this Jewish people that struck our ancestors and destroyed them[15] Find note (#6) above re: Amalek.  and do not follow our religion, and they hate us. 19 And Himmler said before the dictator and the officials, not just us alone does this people hate. 20 Also the Italian fascists our comrades, it hates, and all the people of our alliance. 21 If it is good in the eyes of the dictator, let a word come out like the word of the kingdom before him, and let it be written in the laws of the the Nazis and fascists not to be overturned, to afflict the Jewish people with hard affliction. 22 Also, we will ruin their houses and burn their gathering-places, killing young and old, even children, and through this we will take our revenge. 23 And the remainder we will dress in a mark of shame, and make them labor in hard labor, and thus this people will be ended. 24 And the matter was good in the dictator’s and the officials’ eyes, and Hitler did as Himmler said. 25 And they sent out documents to all the cities and the nations that he was dictator over, for every German Nazi rolling over his house, spoken only in their language, to admonish, afflict, and trample all the Jews their neighbors. 26 And the decree of the dictator that he had said was heard in all the cities of his dictatorship, for it was vast, and in all this the German Nazis listened to his advice and powerfully struck the Jews their neighbors. 27 And they killed by the sword men and boys, and starved elders and children, and afflicted parents and trampled children. 28 And they placed upon them hard labor, and exiled them from their homes and stole their wealth and captured their captives. 29 And the Jews began to flee from the rage of their enemies, and left all that was theirs, and fled as captives before the stress, and the rage of Hitler was not satisfied.
Chapter 2

א אַחַ֣ר ׀ הַדְּבָרִ֣ים הַאֵ֗לֶּה בִּרְאוֹת֤וֹ הַיְּהוּדִים֙ נָסִ֔ים וַ֣חֲמָת֔וֹ עוֹדֶ֥נָּה יוֹקֶ֖דֶת בְּקִרְבּ֑וֹ וְנִקְמַ֧ת זְקֵנָ֛יו אָמַ֖ר עוֹד־לֹ֥א נִקַּֽמְתִּי׃ ב וַיֶ֤אֱסוֹף עוֹד֙ שָׂרָ֣יו וּנְגִידָ֔יו וַיְבַקְּשֵׁ֖ם לִמְצ֣וֹא עֵצָ֑ה שֶׁבָּהּ֩ יְכַלֶּ֨ה הָעָ֤ם הַיְּהוּדִי֙ הַזֶּ֔ה המפוזר [הַמְפֻזָּ֖ר] בְּכׇל־הָאֲרָצֽוֹת׃ ג וַיֹּאמְר֕וּ שָׂרֵ֥י הִיטְלֶ֖יר אֵלָ֑יו יִשְׂתַּדֵּ֣ל אֲדוֹנֵ֔נוּ לִכְבֹּ֛שׁ עָרִ֥ים גְּדוֹל֖וֹת נֶחְמָד֥וֹת לְמַרְאֶֽה׃ ד וַיַּפְקֵ֣יד אֲדוֹנֵ֔נוּ הַחַיָּילִ֖ים שֶֽׁבְּכׇל־עָרֵ֣י מֶמְשָׁלְתּ֑וֹ יְזִינֵ֣ם וִיצַוֵּ֗ם לִלְכֹּ֨ד כׇּל־עִ֤יר גְּדוֹלָה֙ טוֹבַ֣ת מַרְאֶ֔ה יָפָה֙ חֲזָקָ֣ה וּפוֹרִיָ֔ה וְיוֹסִיפ֖וּהָ עַל־מַפַּ֥ת גֶּרְמָֽנְיָא׃ ה וּבָזֶ֖ה תִּגְדַּ֣ל מֶמְשַׁלְתּ֑וֹ וְיִמְצָ֖א אֶת־כׇּל־הַנָּח֥וּץ לֽוֹ׃ ו וּבְכׇבְשׁ֖וֹ הֶעָרִ֣ים הַאֵ֑לֶּה יְיַסֵּ֤ר אוֹיְבָיו֙ וְיַכְנִיעֵ֔ם וְיַעֲשֶׂ֥ה בָּהֶ֖ם כִּרְצוֹנֽוֹ׃ ז וַיִּיטַב֙ הַדָּבָ֔ר לִפְנֵ֥י הִיטְלֶ֖יר וַיַּ֥עַשׂ כֵּֽן׃ ח וַיִתְמַלֵּ֥א חֵמָ֖ה וַיִּלְבַּ֣שׁ נְקָמָ֑ה וַיִּקְבֹּ֤ץ חַיָּילָיו֙ וַיְצַוֵּ֔ם הָ֩לְאָה֩ לְכ֨וּ אָחֺ֜וֹר לֹ֣א תִּסּ֗וֹגוּ לְהַגֵּ֤ן עַל־עַמְּכֶם֙ וְעַ֣ל אַרְצְכֶ֔ם וּלְהַרְחִ֖יב גְּבוּל֥וֹתֵיכֶֽם׃ ט וַיָּרִ֖ימוּ יְדֵיהֶ֑ם וַיִּשָּׁבְע֗וּ לִשְׁפֹּ֧ךְ דָּמָ֛ם בְּעַ֥ד עַמָּ֖ם וּמוֹלַדְתָּֽם׃ י אֲרָצ֣וֹת יְקָר֣וֹת וְנֶחְמָדוֹת֮ הָ֣יוּ בַּיָּמִ֣ים הַהֵם֒ וְהֵ֤ן אוֹתְרִישׁ֙ וּתְשֵׁ֣יקוֹצְלוֹבַ֔קְיָא הַקְּרוֹב֥וֹת לִגְבוּל֖וֹת מֶמְשֶׁ֣לֶת הִיטְלֶ֑יר וְשֶׁבָּהֶ֥ן גָּרִ֖ן גֶּרְמָנִ֥ים רַבִּֽים׃ יא בָּהֶ֗ן צִוָּ֣ה לְהַתְחִיל֮ וַיִּתְנַפְּל֣וּ הַחַיָּילִ֣ים עֲלֵיהֶן֒ מִמָּר֣וֹם ׀ הִשְׁלִ֣יכוּ פִּצְצוֹתֵיהֶ֗ם וּמִמַּ֙טָּה֙ הִכּ֣וּ בְּתוֹתְחֵיהֶ֔ם הָרְס֧וּ הַבָּתִּ֛ים חָרְב֥וּ הָאַרְמוֹנ֖וֹת וְשָׂרְפ֣וּ הַשָׂד֑וֹת ונשפות [וּנְפָשׁ֧וֹת] נְקִיּ֛וֹת בָּר֥וֹת וִישָׁר֖וֹת הָרָֽגוּ׃ יב וַיִּבָּהֲל֤וּ הָאֲנָשִׁים֙ וַיֶּחֱרְד֔וּ וַתִּגְדַּ֥ל הַמְּהוּמָ֖ה בֶּעָרִ֑ים כִּ֨י לֹ֥א יָדְע֛וּ מַה־זֶּ֖ה וְעַל־מַ֥ה זֶּֽה׃ יג וּבְהִכָּנֵ֨ס הַחַיָּילִ֤ים הָעִ֙ירָה֙ הוֹסִ֔יפוּ לִשְׁפֹּ֧ךְ דָּם־נָקִ֛י וּלְעַנּ֥וֹת נֶ֖פֶשׁ תְּמִימָ֑ה צַעֲק֤וֹת הַדָּמִים֙ הָעוֹל֤וֹת הַשָּׁמַ֙יְמָה֙ לֹ֣א שָׁמְע֔וּ גַּם־הֵ֥ם יִקְרְא֖וּ וְלֹ֥א יֵעָנֽוּ׃ יד וּבְכׇבְשׁ֤וֹ עָרִים֙ שֵׁנִ֔ית לָכַ֖ד ליסודית [לִידִּ֑יץ] וְשָׁפַ֖ךְ דַּ֥ם אֲנָשֶֽׁיהָ׃ טו בֶּאֱמֶת כִּ֡י לְיוֹתֵ֣ר מִכֹּל֩ ׀ לַיְּהוּדִ֨ים עִנָּ֜ה אֲבָ֗ל גַּ֛ם לְיוֹשְׁבֵ֥י תֵּבֵ֖ל פָּנָ֣יו פָּנָ֑ה וַיַּשְׂבִּיעֵ֣ם מַכְאוֹבִ֔ים וַיַּטְעִימֵ֖ם חֳלָאִֽים׃ טז חוקה [חֻקָּ֥ה] אַחַ֖ת הָ֣יְתָה ל֑וֹ כׇּל־מִ֨י שֶׁאֵינ֤וֹ נָאזִי֙ שׂוֹנֵ֔א נ֤וֹרָא הוּא֙ לא [ל֔וֹ] וַיַּחֲלֹ֥ק גַּם־ל֖וֹ מִמַּכּוֹתָֽיו׃ יז וּבְכׇל־עִ֨יר וָעִ֜יר וּמְדִינָ֗ה אֲשֶׁ֛ר דגלי [רַגְלֵ֥י] הַנָּאזִ֖ים דּוֹרְכ֑וֹת רַ֤ע וָמַר֙ לַיְּהוּדִ֔ים בְּכִ֤י וָצוֹם֙ וּצְעָק֔וֹת שַׂ֣ק וָאֵ֔פֶר יוצע [יֻצַּ֖ע] לָרַבִּֽים׃ יח אבל [אָ֤ב] מֵעַל־בָּנָיו֙ לוקח [לֻקַּ֔ח] וְלָטֶ֖בַח הולך [הֻלַּ֑ךְ] אֵ֨ם הרבה [הָרַכָּ֤ה] וְתִינוֹקָהּ֙ הֵמִ֔יתוּ בַּחוּרִים֙ לֹ֣א חָנָ֔נוּ וּפְנֵ֥י זְקֵנִ֖ים לֹ֥א נָשָֽׂאוּ׃ יט לְכׇל־אַנְשֵׁ֤י הֶעָרִים֙ עִנָּ֔ה בַּקּ֥וֹר וּבָרָעָ֖ב הֵמִ֑ית בָּתֵּ֤י הַיְּהוּדִים֙ הֶחֱרִ֔יב וּמִדַּרְכֵ֤י אֲבוֹתֵיהֶם֙ הִרְחִיקָ֔ם וַיַּסְגִּירֵ֖ם בַּגֵּֽיטוֹ׃ כ וְלֹ֨א דַּי־ל֤וֹ לְהִיטְלֶיר֙ מַ֣ה־שֶׁעוֹשֶׂ֣ה ה֔וּא וַיְצַוֶּ֗ה גַּ֚ם הָאִ֣יטַלְקִ֔ים הַיַּפּוּנִ֣ים הַהוּנְגָרִ֔ים הַבּוּלְגָרִ֥ים וְהָרוֹמָנִ֖ים לַעֲשׂ֣וֹת כָּמ֑וֹהוּ וַיִּשְׁלְח֧וּ בַּיְּהוּדִ֛ים גַּם־הֵ֖ם חֲר֥וֹן אַפָּֽם׃ כא וַיְהִ֣י צַ֣ר לַיְּהוּדִ֣ים מִכׇּל־צַ֡ד סוֹבְלִים֩ מַכּ֨וֹת עונשים [עֳנָשִׁ֧ים] חֲרָפ֛וֹת גִּדּוּפִ֥ים יִסּוּרִ֖ים וּמִית֣וֹת משונות [מְשֻׁנּ֑וֹת] וּמְנוּחָ֥ה אֵין־לָהֶ֖ם מִכׇּל־עֵֽבֶר׃ כב וַיְצַו֙ הַמּוֹשֵׁ֔ל לִתְל֥וֹת וְלַהֲרֹ֖ג כׇּל־הַמּוֹרֵ֣ד בּ֑וֹ וַיִכְתְּבוּ֙ חוקה [חֻקָּ֣ה] ז֔וֹ בְּסֵ֛פֶר דִּבְרֵ֥י הַיָּמִ֖ים אֲשֶׁ֥ר לֽוֹ׃
1 After these things, when he saw the Jews’ trials, and his rage still burned in his gut, and the vengeance of his ancestors[16] Find note (#6) above re: Himmler  he said “I have not yet avenged.” 2 And he again gathered his officials and nobles and asked them to find a plan with which this Jewish people scattered among all the lands could be destroyed. 3 And Hitler’s officials said to him, “Let our master endeavor to conquer great and pleasant-looking cities. 4 And let our master order the soldiers in all the cities of his dictatorship, arm them and command them to destroy every great, pleasant-looking, beautiful, strong, and fruitful city, and add them to the map of Germany. 5 And in this, let your dictatorship grow, and may he find all he requires. 6 And in his destruction of these cities let his enemies be tormented and destroyed, and he will do with them as he wishes.” 7 And the matter seemed good to Hitler and he did so. 8 And he filled himself with rage and was garbed in vengeance and gathered his forces and commanded them “Go further ahead, do not turn back, to guard your people and your land and expand your borders!” 9 And they raised their hands and swore to spill their blood for their people and homeland. 10 Glorious and pleasant lands were in those days, and they were Austria and Czechoslovakia, close to the borders of the dictatorship of Hitler, and in them lived many Germans. 11 In them, he commanded to start, and the soldiers fell upon them; from above they cast their bombs, and from below they struck their cannons; they destroyed the houses, ruined the palaces, and burned the fields, and pure and clean and upright souls they killed. 12 And the people panicked and trembled, and the tumult grew in the cities, for they did not know what it was or what it was about. 13 And as the soldiers entered the city, they began to spill innocent blood and torture pure souls; the cries of the blood that went up to heaven they did not hear, also they called but none answered. 14 And in their second conquering of cities they captured Lidice[17] A town in Czechoslovakia which was completely destroyed on June 10, 1942 in retaliation for the assassination of Reinhard Heydrich.  and spilled the blood of its people. 15 Truly, most of all he afflicted the Jews, but he also turned his face to the other earth-dwellers, and sated them with pain and seasoned them with sickness. 16 One law it was for him: hate all who are not a Nazi; he was terrible to them and also apportioned them plagues. 17 And in every single city and land upon which Nazi feet tread, evil and bitterness to the Jews, weeping and fasting and moaning, sackcloth and ashes were spread out to the masses. 18 The father was taken from his sons and led to the slaughter, the gentle mother and her infant they killed; they had no mercy on lands, and did not lift up the faces of elders. 19 And to all the people of the cities they afflicted, with chill and hunger they killed, the houses of the Jews they destroyed, and from their ancestors’ roads they separated them and enclosed them in the ghetto. 20 But it was not enough for Hitler what he was doing, and he commanded also the Italians and Japanese and Hungarians and Bulgarians and Romanians to do as he did, and they also sent their hot rage against the Jews. 21 And he was a stressor to the Jews on all fronts, surrounding them with plagues and punishments and disgraces and curses and anguish and myriad deaths and they found no rest from any side. 22 And the dictator commanded to hang and to kill any rebel against him, and they wrote this law in the book of chronicles that was his.
Chapter 3

א אַחַ֣ר ׀ הַדְּבָרִ֣ים הַאֵלֶּ֗ה גִּדַּל֩ המשול [הַמּוֹשֵׁ֨ל] הִיטְלֶ֜יר אֶת־הִימְלֶ֛יר הָאֲגָגִ֖י וַֽיְנַשְּׂאֵ֑הוּ וַיָּ֙רֵים֙ אֶת־כִּסְּא֔וֹ מֵעַ֕ל כׇּל־שָׂרֵ֥י הַגֶּיסְטָ֖אפּוֹ אֲשֶׁ֥ר לֽוֹ׃ ב וְכׇל־הַנָּאזִ֗ים כּוֹרְעִ֤ים וּמִשְׁתַּחֲוִים֙ לְהִימְלֶ֔יר כִּי־כֵ֖ן צִוָּ֣ה הִיטְלֶ֑יר וְהַ֨יְּהוּדִ֔ים אֵינָ֥ם שׁוֹמְעִ֖ים בְּקוֹלֽוֹ׃ ג וַיִּכְעַ֖ס עֲלֵיהֶ֑ם וַיַּ֤עַשׂ בָּהֶם֙ שַׁמּ֣וֹת וּנְקָמ֔וֹת וַהֲרֵיג֖וֹת לְאֵ֥ין מִסְפָּֽר׃ ד ע֥וֹד לֹ֨א שָׂבְעָ֤ה בִּטְנוֹ֙ מִטַּרְפּ֔וֹ פָּרַ֛שׂ רֶ֥שֶׁת לְדַאנְתְזִ֖ינְג לְמׇשְׁכָ֣הּ לִגְב֑וּלוֹ לַמְר֕וֹת רוֹב־הַצָּע֥וֹת הַשָּׁל֖וֹם שֶׁהִצִּ֥יעוּ לֽוֹ׃ ה הַפּוֹלָנִ֤ים הַגִּבּוֹרִים֙ אֶת־עַצְמָ֣ם הֵכִ֔ינוּ וַיֵּצְא֛וּ לִקְרַ֖את הַשּׁוֹדֵ֣ד הַזֶּ֑ה וַיִּלָּחֲמ֤וּ עִמּוֹ֙ בְּחׇזְקָ֔ה וַיַּפִּ֥ילוּ מִמֶּ֖נוּ חֲלָלִ֥ים רַבִּֽים׃ ו גַּ֚ם צָרְפַ֣ת הָאַבִּירָ֔ה וּבְרִיטָ֖אנְיָא הָעֲצוּמָ֑ה לִרְא֨וֹת הָעָ֤וֶל הַזֶּה֙ רָצ֔וּ כִּ֛י לְהִתְאַפֵּ֖ק עוֹד־לֹ֥א יָכְלֽוּ׃ ז וַיִּכְרְת֤וּ בֵּינֵיהֶם֙ בְּרִ֔ית לְהַשְׁמִ֛יד לַהֲרֹ֥ג וּלְאַבֵּ֖ד כׇּל־הַנָּאזִ֑ים כולם [כֻּלָּ֛ם] לְמִגָּד֖וֹל וְעַ֥ד קָטָֽן׃ ח וַיְגַיְּס֤וּ חַיָּילֵ֙יהֶם֙ וַיִּשְׁלְח֣וּ אֲוִירוֹנֵ֔יהֶם וַיַּהַ֣רְסוּ ל֔וֹ הֶעָרִ֖ים וּבָתֵּ֣י הַחֲרֹ֑שֶׁת וַיַּשְׁקִ֥יעוּ הַיָּ֖מָה אֳנִיּוֹתָֽיו׃ ט וּבְהַרְאוֹת֗וֹ תׇּקְפּוֹ֙ וּגְב֣וּרָת֔וֹ שָׁלַ֨ח צְבָא֧וֹת וָנֶ֛שֶׁק לְאֵ֥ין מִסְפָּ֖ר לְצַ֣ד פּוֹלַ֑נְיָה וַיְפוֹצֵ֤ץ עָרֵ֙יהָ֙ בְּפִצְצוֹתָ֔יו הַיּוֹרְד֖וֹת יוֹמָ֥ם וָלַֽיְלָה׃ י וַיִּשְׂרְפוּ֙ הַבָּתִּ֔ים וַיָּמ֖וּתוּ הָאֲנָשִׁ֑ים וְל֨א חָדַ֤ל מִלִּזְרֹק֙ הַפְּצָצ֔וֹת עַ֛ד שֶׁהִכְנִ֥יעַ תַּחְתָּ֖יו כׇּל־אֲנָשֶֽׁיהָ׃ יא וּבְבוֹאוֹ֙ לְת֣וֹךְ הַעִ֔יר אָמַ֥ר עִם־הַסֵּ֖פֶר לְכַלּוֹתָ֑ם כְּמַחְשַׁבְתּ֧וֹ הָרָעָ֛ה שֶׁחָשַׁ֥ב עַל־הַיְּהוּדִ֖ים לְהֻמָּ֥ם וּלְאַבְּדָֽם׃ יב וַיִּשְׁלַ֤ח בְּעֵרָה֙ בְּעָ֣רֵיהֶ֔ם וַתִּֽיקַּד־אֵ֥שׁ בְּבָתֵּיהֶ֖ם וַתֹּאכַ֣ל גָּרֵיהֶ֑ם אַכְזָרִי֣וּת ׀ גְּדוֹלָ֣ה וְעַזָּ֗ה אֲשֶׁ֣ר עַ֚יִן לֹ֣א רָאֲתָ֔ה וְאֹ֖זֶן לֹ֥א שָׁמְעָֽה׃ יג וַיִּתֵּ֣ן ׀ צַ֣ו לִנְגִידָ֗יו לְהַדְבִּיק֙ א֣וֹת הַקָּל֔וֹן בַּבַּ֥יִת וּבַחֲנ֖וּת כׇּל־יְהוּדִ֑י וַיַּעַבְרוּ֙ וַיַּ֣עֲשׂ֔וּ כְּכׇל־אֲשֶׂ֛ר צווה [צִוָּ֥ה] אוֹתָ֖ם הִיטְלֶֽיר׃ יד וַיִּכְבֹּ֤שׁ הִיטְלֶיר֙ פּוֹלַ֔נְיָה בַּחֹ֥דֶשׁ הַרִאשׁ֖וֹן הוּא־חֹ֣דֶשׁ תִּשְׁרֵ֑י בַּשָׁנָ֥ה הַשִּׁשִּׁ֖ית לְמֶמְשַׁלְתּֽוֹ׃ טו וַיִּשְׂנָ֣א אֲנָשֶׁ֔יהָ מִכׇּל־אַנְשֵׁ֖י הֶעָרִ֑ים וַיַּמְשֵׁ֥יל עָלֵ֖יהָ הִימְלֶ֥יר הַנָּגִֽיד׃ טז וַיַּעַבְר֣וּ צִבְא֣וֹת הִיטְלֶ֡יר לְ֠בֵּלְגִיָּ֠א וַיִּלְכְּד֨וּהָ לְלוּכְּסֶימְבּ֜וּרְג וַיִּכְבְּשׁ֣וּהָ להוללאנד [לְהוֹלַּ֗אנְד] וַיְפוֹצְצ֨וּהָ לְצָרְפַ֜ת וַיֹּאחָז֗וּהָ וְגַ֣ם הַבַּלְקָנִ֣ים הַשְּׁקֵטִים֮ לֹ֣א שָׁכְחוּ֒ וַיִּלְכְּדוּ֙ דֵּאנֵמַ֣ארְק נוֹרְבֵ֔יז לִיתְוַ֤אנִי לִית֙וּנִי֙ וְאֶיסְט֔וֹנִי יוֹגוּסְלַ֖אבְיָא וְיָוָ֑ן וַיַּעֲשׂ֥וּ בָּהֶ֖ם כִּרְצוֹנָֽם׃ יז וַיִּבְגְּד֣וּ הַנָּאזִ֣ים בָּרוּסִים֮ וַיַּחֲנ֣וּ בְּעָרֵיהֶם֒ וַתִּלָּקַח֩ מִ֨לְחָמָ֤ה עַזָּה֙ בֵּינֵיהֶ֔ם וַיַּפִּ֣ילוּ מֵהֶם֩ הָרוּסִ֨ים הַתַּקִּיפִ֤ים ׀ חֲלָלִים֙ לְאֵ֣ין מִסְפָּ֔ר וְנֶ֥שֶׁק רַ֖ב שָׁבָ֑רוּ כִּ֣י לְהַשְׁמִ֗יד זֶ֚רַע הִיטְלֶ֣יר וּמוּסוֹלִ֔ינִי הַאֲגָגִ֖ים גַּם־הֵ֥ם חָשָֽׁבוּ׃ יח וַיַּכּ֤וּ הָרוּסִים֙ הַנָּאזִ֣ים וְהַפַֿאסִ֔יסְת מַכַּֽת־חֶ֥רֶב וְהֶ֖רֶג וְאָבְדָ֑ן וַיַּעֲשׂ֥וּ בָּהֶ֖ם כַּטּ֥וֹב בְּעֵינֵיהֶֽם׃ יט וּבְכׇל־עִ֤יר וָעִיר֙ גִּבּוֹרִ֣ים לאמיים [לְאֻמִּיִּ֔ם] עָמְד֥וּ וַיַּהַרְג֖וּ נָאזִ֣ים וּפָֿאסִ֑יסְת וַיַּהַפְכ֤וּ הָרַכָּבוֹת֙ וַיְרַצְּצ֣וּ הַנֶּ֔שֶׁק וּמִקְלָ֧ט שָׂ֛מוּ לָהֶ֖ם בֵּ֥ין הֶהָרִֽים׃ כ וַיְצַ֣ו הִיטְלֶ֔יר לְכׇל־שָׂרֵ֥י הַגֶּיסְטָ֖אפּוֹ וַיֹּאמַ֑ר בִּמְק֤וֹם נָאזִי֙ תַּהַרְג֣וּ אֶ֔לֶף וּבִמְק֤וֹם שְׁנַ֙יִם֙ רְבָבָ֔ה וְהַחֲשׁוּדִ֥ים תַּאַ֖סְרוּ בַּכֶּֽבֶל׃ כא וַיַּ֤עֲשׂוּ־כֵן֙ הַשָּׂרִ֔ים וַיְעַ֥נּוּ וַיַּהַרְג֖וּ אָב֥וֹת וּבָנִֽים׃ כב וְכׇל־זֶ֕ה אֵינֶ֥נּוּ שֹׁוֶ֖ה לָהֶ֑ם בִּרְאוֹתָ֗ם שֶׁיֵ֤שׁ עוֹד֙ עָרִ֣ים אֲחֵר֔וֹת שֶׁשָּׁ֤ם הַיְּהוּדִים֙ שְׁלֵוִ֣ים וּשְׁקֵטִ֔ים וַיַּחְפְּצ֛וּ לִנְגּ֥וֹעַ בָּהֶ֖ם לָרַֽע׃
1 After these things, the dictator Hitler promoted Himmler the Agagite[18] Find note (#6) above re: Amalek  and lifted him up and raised his seat over all the officials of the Gestapo who were his. 2 And all the Nazis kneeled and bowed to Himmler, because thus commanded Hitler, but the Jews did not listen to his voice. 3 And he was angry at them and he did against them horrors and vengeances and countless murders. 4 His stomach not yet sated for prey, he stretched his net to Danzig to extend it to his border despite the many peace offers offered to him. 5 The heroic Poles prepared themselves and went out to meet that ṙȯḃḃėṙ,[19] This word is emphasized in the original scroll because, according to Ḥassin’s pseudo-masoretric count, it is the central word of the entire scroll.  and made war with him in strength, and many casualties fell from among them. 6 Also gallant France and mighty Britain ran to see this injustice because they could no longer hold back. 7 And they cut an alliance between them to wipe out, kill, and destroy all the Nazis, all of them from the greatest to the smallest. 8 And they recruited their soldiers and they sent their aircraft and destroyed their cities and factories and their ships quieted the seas. 9 And when he saw its strength and might, he sent armies and counties weapons to the Polish front, and bombarded its cities with his bombs, coming down day and night. 10 And they burned the houses and killed the people and never ceased dropping the bombs until all its people surrendered under him. 11 And when he came into the city he said with the book to destroy them per his evil schemes that he had schemed against the Jews to overwhelm and destroy them. 12 And he sent flame into their cities and concentrated fire on their houses and consumed their dwellings; great and powerful wickedness that no eye had seen and no ear had heard. 13 He commanded his nobles to affix a mark of shame on the house and shop of every Jew, and they passed through and did all that Hitler had commanded them. 14 And Hitler conquered Poland in the first month, that is the month of Tishrei,[20] The first month!? Tishrei is the seventh month! The original scroll refers to it as the first month, probably because it’s the first month after the new year. But everywhere else in the scroll months are counted the Biblical way, with the first month being Nisan.  in the sixth year of his dictatorship. 15 And he hated its people more than all the people of the cities, and set as dictator over them Himmler the officer. 16 And Hitler’s armies passed through Belgium and captured Luxembourg and conquered Holland and bombarded and seized France, and also they did not forget the quiet Balkans, and captured Denmark, Norway, Latvia, Lithuania, Estonia, Yugoslavia, and Greece, and did to them as they wished. 17 And the Nazis betrayed the Russians and camped against their cities and waged powerful war between them, and from among the mighty Russians fell countless casualties, and they shattered many weapons, for they also thought to destroy the seed of Hitler and Mussolini the Agagites.[21] Find note (#6) above re: Amalek  18 And the Russians struck the Nazis and the fascists with the strike of the sword and killing and destruction, and did to them as was good in their eyes. 19 And in every city the nations’ heroes stood up and killed Nazis and fascists and overturned the tanks and smuggled weapons and set up refuges for them among the mountains. 20 And Hitler commanded all the officials of the Gestapo and said: “For each Nazi you will kill a thousand, and for every two ten thousand, and the suspects you will imprison in chains.” 21 And the officials did so and afflicted and killed fathers and sons. 22 But all this was not enough for them, when they saw that there were still other cities where the Jews lived in wholeness and tranquility, and they sought to strike them for evil.
Chapter 4

א וִיהוּדֵ֣י ׀ הֶעָרִ֣ים הָאֵ֗לֶּה יָדְעוּ֙ כׇּל־אֲשֶׁ֣ר נַעֲשָׂ֔ה וַ֤יִּקְרְעוּ֙ בִּגְדֵיהֶ֔ם וַיִּ֥לְבְּשׁוּ שַׂ֖ק וָאֵ֑פֶר כִּ֣י ׀ יָרְא֣וּ לְנַפְשׁוֹתָ֗ם וַיִבְרְחוּ֙ מִן־הֶעָרִ֣ים הָאֵ֔לֶּה בִּזְעָק֥וֹת גְּדוֹל֖וֹת וּמָרֽוֹת׃ ב ויכלו [וַיֵּלְכוּ֙] בָּאֳנִיּ֣וֹת מִפְרָשִׁ֔ים עַ֕ד לִפְנֵ֛י שַׁעֲרֵ֥י בְּרִיטָ֖אנְיָא וְאָמֵ֑ירִיקָא כִּי־אֵ֥ין לָב֛וֹא לֶעָרִ֥ים אֵ֖לֶּה בְּלִ֥י רְשֽׁוּת׃ ג וַיָּב֥וֹאוּ אֲחֵיהֶ֖ם לְנַחֲמָ֑ם וּלְהָסִ֥יר הַשַּׁקִּ֛ים מֵעֲלֵיהֶ֖ם וְלֹ֥א קִבְּלֽוּ׃ ד וַיֹּאמְרוּ֙ אֲלֵיהֶ֔ם אַחֵ֤ינוּ בְּאִיטָ֙אלְיָא֙ מֵתִ֣ים בְּיַפּ֔וּן מעונים [מְעֻנִּ֣ים] בְּגֶרְמָ֔נְיָא וּבְהַרְבֵּ֥ה אֲרָצ֖וֹת נִרְמַסִ֑ים אָ֣נוּ גּוֹלִ֔ים וּמַ֥ה תִּהְיֶ֖ה אַחֲרִיתֵֽנוּ׃ ה גַּ֥ם הַרְבֵּ֛ה מֵחֲבֵרֵ֥ינוּ הַבַּלְקָנִ֖ים נִתְנָאֲז֑וּ כִּ֥י נָפַ֛ל פַּ֥חַד הִיטְלֶ֖יר עֲלֵיהֶֽם׃ ו וַיַּגִּ֣ידוּ לָהֶ֔ם כׇּל־אֲשֶׁ֖ר נַעֲשָׂ֣ה לַיְּהוּדִ֑ים וּגְזֵ֣רוֹת הִיטְלֶ֗יר אֲשֶׁ֨ר גָּזַ֤ר עֲלֵיהֶם֙ לְכַלּוֹתָ֣ם וּלְהַשְׁמִידָ֔ם וַיֹּאמְר֣וּ אֲלֵיהֶ֗ם אַל־תְּדַמּוּ֙ בנשפכם [בְּנַ֣פְשְׁכֶ֔ם] לְמַלֵּ֛ט יְהוּדֵ֥י אָמֵ֖ירִיקָא מִכׇּל־הֶעָרִֽים׃ ז כִּ֣י הַחֲרֵ֣ישׁ תַּחֲרִ֮ישׁוּ֮ בָּעֵ֣ת הַזֹּאת֒ רֶ֣וַח וְהַצָּ֞לָה לַיְּהוּדִים֙ ע֣וֹד אַ֔יִן וְגַם־אַתֶּ֖ם תֹּאבֵ֑דוּ וּמִ֣י יוֹדֵ֔עַ אִם־לֹ֥א עַל־יְדֵיכֶ֖ם תָּב֥וֹא הַיְּשׁוּעָֽה׃
1 And the Jews of these cities knew all that was done, and they tore their clothes and wore sackcloth and ashes, for they feared for their lives, and fled from these cities with great and bitter cries. 2 And they went on sailing ships to the gates of Britain and America, for they could not come to those cities without permission. 3 And their brethren came to comfort them and remove the sackcloth from them but they refused. 4 And they said to them, “Our brethren in Italy are dead in Japan, tortured in Germany, and in many lands are trampled; we are exiled, and what will become of us? 5 As well, many of our Balkan comrades have Nazified,[22] An original coinage of the author, a reflexive verb form of the root “Nazi”  because the fear of Hitler has fallen upon them!” 6  And they told them all that had happened to the Jews, and the decrees of Hitler that he had decreed against them to destroy them and wipe them out, and they said to them, “Do not think yourself safe, Jews of America, from all the cities. 7 For if you are silent, silent at this time, support and rescue will come from nowhere else from the Jews, and you too will die; and who knows if it is not by your hand that salvation will come?”
Chapter 5

א וַיְהִ֗י בַּשָּׁנָ֨ה הַשְּׁלִישִׁ֜ית לַמִּלְחָמָ֗ה וַיִּלְבְּשׁ֤וּ הָאָמֵירִיקָאִים֙ נְקָמָ֔ה ובואו [וַיָּב֙וֹאוּ֙] לְעֶזְרַ֣ת בְּרִיטָ֔נְיָא לְהִתְנַפֵּ֧ל יַ֛חַד עַ֥ל הַאוֹיֵ֖ב וּלְהַשְׁמִיד֑וֹ וּלְהַצִּ֤יל הָאֱנוֹשִׁיוּת֙ וּלְמַלֵּ֣ט הַתֵּ֔בֵל וּלְבַעֵ֥ת הָרַ֖ע מִקֶּ֥רֶב הָעַמִּֽים׃ ב וַיָּכִ֤ינוּ נֶ֙שֶׁק֙ כְּח֣וֹל הַיָּ֔ם וָאֳנִיּ֖וֹת לְאֵ֣ין מִסְפָּ֑ר צְבָא֧וֹת עֲצוּמִ֛ים אֲוִירוֹנִ֥ים רַבִּ֖ים וְטַיָּסִ֥ים אַבִּירִֽים׃ ג וַיַּהַרְס֣וּ ׀ כׇּל־בָּתֵּ֣י הַחֲר֗וֹשֶׁת וַיְחָ֥רְבוּ־לוֹ֙ הַרְבֵּ֣ה מְקוֹמ֔וֹת שֶׁשָּׁ֥ם מְכִינִ֖ים כְּלֵ֣י זַ֑יִן וַתִּגְדַּ֤ל הַמְּלָאכָה֙ עַ֣ל־הַפּוֹעֲלִ֔ים וְלֹ֥א יָכְל֖וּ לַעֲשׂ֥וֹת בָּֽהּ׃ ד וַיְהִ֨י בִּרְא֤וֹת הִיטְלֶיר֙ הַפְּצָצ֣וֹת הַחֲזָק֔וֹת שֶׁזּוֹרֶ֧קֶת עָלָ֛יו עׇצְמַ֥ת הָאֲוִ֖יר הַמַּלְכוּתִ֑ית חָרַ֥ד לְבָב֛וֹ וַיִּמָּלֵ֥א עַל־הַיְּהוּדִ֖ים חֵמָֽה׃ ה מִׄלִּׄיׄבִּ֑ׄיׄ אַחֲרֵ֣י ׀ שְׁנָתַ֣יִם שֶׁל־מִלְחָמָ֗ה הַגֶּ֤רְמָנִים֙ וְהָ֣אִיטַאלְקִ֔ים הוכו [הֻכּ֤וּ] ונוצחו [וְנֻצְּחוּ֙] וַיִּדָּחֲפ֣וּ מִשָׁ֔ם אֲבֵלִ֖ים וַחֲפוּיֵ֥י רֹאֽשׁ׃ ו וַיִּבְרְח֛וּ בִּרְעָדָ֥ה וְאֵימָ֖ה וַיִּסּ֣וֹגוּ אָח֑וֹר וַתִּגְדַּ֥ל הַמְּהוּמָ֖ה בְּכׇל־הַמַּחֲנֶֽה׃ ז וַיִּמָּלֵ֧א הִיטְלֶ֛יר כַּ֖עַס עַל־הַיְּהוּדִ֑ים וַיַּחְפֹּ֞ץ לְהַשְׁמִ֨יד יְהוּדֵ֤י מָאר֙וֹקוֹ֙ וְיוֹשְׁבֵ֣י אַלגִּ֔ירְיָא וּלְעַנּוֹתָ֖ם כַּאֲחֵיהֶֽם׃ ח בַּחֹ֤דֶשׁ הַשְּׁמִינִי֙ הוּא־חֹ֣דֶשׁ חֶשְׁוָ֔ן בַּשָּׁנָ֥ה הָעֲשִׂירִ֖ית לְמֶמְשַׁלְתּ֑וֹ הִפִּ֨ילוּ גּוֹרָ֜ל לִפְנֵ֣י הִיטְלֶ֗יר מִיּ֧וֹם ׀ לְי֛וֹם וּמֵחֹ֛דֶשׁ לְחֹ֥דֶשׁ הַתְּשִׁיעִ֖י הוּא־חֹ֥דֶשׁ כִּסְלֵֽו׃ ט וַיַּ֨רְא הִיטְלֶ֜יר כִּ֣י ׀ בְּחֹ֣דֶשׁ זֶ֗ה אֵ֤בֶל גָּדוֹל֙ הָיָ֣ה לַיְּהוּדִ֔ים וְלֹ֣א זָכַ֗ר כִּ֚י הוּא־חֹ֣דֶשׁ הַנִּיצָּח֔וֹן שֶׁבּ֥וֹ נִצְּח֖וּ הַחֲשְׁמוֹנָאִ֑ים עַל־כֵּ֛ן חֲמָס֥וֹ עַל־קׇדְקֳד֖וֹ יָרַֽד׃ י וַיְצַ֣ו וַיְדַבְּק֣וּ פְּתָקוֹת֮ בְּכׇל־הָרְחוֹבוֹת֒ לְהוֹדִ֡יעַ לְכׇל־הַנָּאזִ֣ים וְ֠הַפָֿאסִ֠יסְת לְהַשְׁמִ֨יד כׇּל־הַ֤יְּהוּדִים֙ בְּי֣וֹם אֶחָ֔ד בְּשִׁשָּׁ֖ה לְחֹ֣דֶשׁ כִּסְלֵ֑ו וּשְׁלָלָ֖ם לָבֽוֹז׃ יא פַּתְשֶׁ֣גֶן הַכְּתָ֗ב לְהִנָּ֤תֵֽן דָּת֙ בְּמָאר֣וֹקוֹ וּבְאַלְגִּ֔ירְיָא לִהְי֥וֹת עֲתִידִ֖ים לַיּ֣וֹם הַזֶּ֑ה לְהִנָּקֵ֖ם מֵהַיְּהוּדִֽים׃ יב הַמּוֹדָע֤וֹת נִתְלוּ֙ כִּדְבָ֣ר הַמּוֹשֵׁ֔ל וְהַדָּ֥ת נִתְּנָ֖ה בְּמָאר֣וֹקוֹ וְאַלְגִּ֑ירְיָא הִיטְלֶ֤יר וְנָזָיו֙ יָשְׁב֣וּ לִשְׁתּ֔וֹת וְהַיְּהוּדִ֖ים נְבוֹכִֽים׃
1 And it was in the third year of the war, and the Americans were garbed in vengeance[23] This scroll does not mention the attack on Pearl Harbor, probably because of its focus on the European war.  and came to the help of Britain to fall upon the enemy together and destroy him, and to save humanity and to rescue the world, and to purge evil from the peoples’ midst. 2 And they set up weapons like the sand of the sea, and countless ships, mighty armies and many aircraft and gallant pilots. 3 And they destroyed all the factories and ruined many of the places where they set up armaments, and the labor increased for the workers but they could not do it. 4 And it was, when Hitler saw the powerful bombs that the Royal Air Force was dropping on him, his heart trembled and he grew filled with rage against the Jews. 5 Ḟṙȯṁ ṁẏ ḣėȧṙṫ:[24] This phrase (just one word in Hebrew) is emphasized in the original scroll to clarify that the rest of this chapter is an authorial indulgence. Find the Introduction.  After two years of war, the Germans and Italians were beaten and defeated and fled away morning with head covered. 6 And they fled in terror and fear, and turned back, and the tumult grew in all the camp. 7 And Hitler was full of anger against the Jews, and he wished to wipe out the Jews of Morocco and dwelling in Algeria, and to afflict them like their brethren. 8 In the eight month, that is the month of Ḥeshvan, in the tenth year of his dictatorship, lots were cast before Hitler from day to day and month to the ninth month, that is the month of Kislev. 9 And Hitler saw that in this month was great mourning for the Jews, and did not remember that it was the month of victory, in which the Hasmoneans were victorious, and thus his brutality fell upon his own pate. 10 And he commanded they affix notes in all the streets to let all the Nazis and fascists know to wipe out all the Jews on a single day, day six of the month of Kislev, and their property to pillage. 11 The copy of the writ was to be given as law in Morocco and Algeria to be prepared for that day, to get vengeance upon the Jews. 12 The notices were hung up per the dictator’s word, and the law was given in Morocco and Algeria; Hitler and his Nazis sat to drink, and the Jews were confounded.
Chapter 6

א בַּלַּ֣יְלָה הַה֔וּא נָדְדָ֛ה מְנוּחַ֥ת הַשַּׁלִּ֖יט רוזווילט [רוּזֵוֵ֑ילְט] לְהַצִּ֛יל הֶעָרִ֥ים הָאֵ֖לֶּה וּלְהָגֵ֥ן עֲלֵיהֶֽם׃ ב וַיָּב֣וֹאוּ הָאָמֵירִיקָאִים֮ בִּשְׁמוֹנָ֣ה לְנוֹבֵ֒אמְבֶּר֒ וַיִּכָּנְס֨וּ לֶעָרִ֜ים בְּי֣וֹם רְבִיעִי֮ אַחַ֣ד עָשָׂ֣ר לְנוֹבֵ֒אמְבֶּר֒ מַתְאִים֙ עִם־[בֵּ֣ת] ב כִּסְלֵ֔ו לַיְּהוּדִ֕ים הָיְתָ֛ה אור [אוֹרָ֥ה] וְשִׂמְחָ֖ה וְשָׂשׂ֣וֹן יקר [וִיקַ֑ר] וּבְהַגִּ֣יעַ הַיּ֡וֹם אֲשֶׁ֣ר קיו [קִוּ֣וּ] הָאַכְזָרִים֩ לִשְׁל֨וֹט בַּיְּהוּדִ֜ים הַיּ֨וֹם אֲשֶׁ֤ר נֶהְפַּֽךְ־לָ֙נוּ֙ מִיָּג֣וֹן לְשִׂמְחָ֔ה כִּ֛י הָאָמֵ֥ירִיקָאִיִּ֖ים שָׁלְט֥וּ עֲלֵיהֶֽם׃ ג נִקְהֲל֣וּ ׀ הַיְּהוּדִ֣ים בְּעָרֵיהֶ֗ם וַיָּחֹ֙גּוּ֙ חַ֣ג הַגְּאֻלָּ֔ה מִשְׁתֶּ֖ה וְי֣וֹם ט֑וֹב וְרַבִּ֗ים מֵרוֹדְפֵ֨י דֶּ֤רֶךְ הַנָּאזִים֙ מִתְיַ֣הֲדִ֔ים כִּ֛י נָפַ֥ל פַּֽחַד־הָאַלְיֵ֖י עֲלֵיהֶֽם׃ ד וּבְכׇל־עִ֣יר וָעִ֗יר אֲשֶׁר֙ הָאָמֵירִיקָאִ֣ים בָּאִ֔ים חוקי [חֻקֵּ֛י] הַנָּאזִ֥ים וְהַפָֿאסִ֖יסְת מְפֵירִ֑ים וְהָעַמִּ֖ים צֹהֲלִ֥ים וּשְׂמֵחִֽים׃ ה וַיִּרְדְּפ֕וּ הָאָמֵירִיקָאִיִּ֨ים הַצָּרְפַתִּי֤ם וְהַבְּרִיטָאנִים֙ שׂוֹנְאֵ֔יהֶם וַיּוֹצִיא֖וּם מִח֣וּץ לְאַפְרִיקָ֑א וַיַּעֲשׂ֥וּ בָּהֶ֖ם כִּרְצוֹנָֽם׃ ו וַיִּכְבְּשׁ֧וּ ׀ טְרִיפּוֹלִ֛י ס֥וּס סְפָא֖קְס קֵיְרֻוָ֣אן וְגָאבֶּ֑יס וַתִּגְדַּ֥ל הַשִּׁמְחָ֖ה בְּכׇל־הֶעָרִֽים׃ ז וַיָּב֨וֹאוּ מִסְפַּ֤ר הַהֲרוּגִים֙ כְּאַרְבָּעִ֣ים אָ֑לֶף וְהָאֲסוּרִ֛ים כְּמֵאָ֖ה וַחֲמִישִּׁ֣ים אֶ֑לֶף וּבַבִּזָּ֖ה שָׁלְח֥וּ יְדֵיהֶֽם׃ ח שׂוֹנְאִ֣ים לְאֵ֣ין מִסְפָּר֮ הִפִּ֒ילוּ֒ וּכְלֵ֣י זַ֗יִן רַ֚ב מָצְא֔וּ וַיַּעֲשׂ֥וּ בְּשׂוֹנְאֵיהֶ֖ם כִּרְצוֹנָ֑ם וְאִ֨ישׁ לֹ֤א עָמַד֙ לִפְנֵיהֶ֔ם כִּ֛י נָפַ֥ל פַּֽחַד־הָאַלְיֵ֖י עֲלֵיהֶֽם׃
1 That night the rest of the leader Roosevelt was disturbed to save these cities and shield them. 2 And the Americans came on the eighth of November and entered the cities on Wednesday the eleventh of November,[25] 11 November 1942, Allied victory in the Second Battle of El Alamein and the beginning of the Western Desert Campaign.  matching with 2 Kislev; the Jews had light and gladness and joy and honor, and when the day came upon which the wicked ones had hoped to rule over the Jews, that very day was reversed for us from sorrow to joy, because the Americans ruled over them. 3 The Jews gathered in their cities and celebrated a festival of redemption, drinking and a holiday, and many of the Jews’ pursuers in their cities acted as Jews, since the fear of the Allies had fallen upon them. 4 And in each and every city where the Americans came, the laws of the Nazis and fascists were overturned, and the peoples rejoiced and were happy. 5 And the Americans, French, and British pursued their enemies and forced them out of Africa, and did to them as they wanted. 6 And they conquered Tripoli, Sousse, Sfax, Kairouan, and Gabès,[26] Several cities in North Africa — all but one in Tunisia. Tripoli (in Libya) was taken on 23 January 1943. Gabès was taken 28 March 1943. Sousse, Sfax, and Kairouan were all taken between 10 and 12 April 1943.  and the joy grew in all the cities. 7 And the number of killed came to about forty thousand, and the imprisoned was about a hundred and fifty thousand, and they set their hands to the spoils. 8 Countless enemies fell, and many armaments were found, and they did to their enemies as they wanted, and not a man stood against them, since the fear of the Allies had fallen upon them.
Chapter 7

א בַּחֹדֶ֨שׁ הַשֵּׁנִ֜י הוּא־חֹ֣דֶשׁ אִיָּ֗יר בִּשְׁלֹשָׁ֤ה יָמִים֙ בּ֔וֹ נִכְנְס֥וּ לְתוּנִ֖יסְיָא וּבִיזֵ֑ירְת מִלְּט֤וּ הָאֲסוּרִים֙ וְהִשְׂבִּ֣יעוּ הָרְעֵבִ֔ים וְהַנָּסִ֥ים הִטְבִּ֖יעוּ בקאפ [בְּקַאףּ]־בּֽוֹן׃ ב וַיִּהְי֣וּ ׀ רגלי [דִּגְלֵ֣י] הָאָמֵירִיקָאִ֗ים הַבְּרִיטָאנִ֧ים וְהַצָּרְפַתִּ֛ים מְאִירִ֖ים בְּעָרִ֣ים אֵ֑לֶּה וְדִגְלֵ֤י הַנָּאזִים֙ וְהַ֣פָֿאסִ֔יסְת נִרמָסִ֖ים לָאָֽרֶץ׃ ג וּבְתוּנִ֣יסְיָא הַבִּירָ֔ה הָרְג֥וּ הָאַלְיֵ֖י וְאַבֵּ֑ד כְּמָאתַ֛יִים וַחֲמִישִּׁ֥ים אֶ֖לֶף אִֽישׁ׃
1 In the second month, that is the month of Iyyar, on the third day,[27] 8 May 1943, when Allied forces advanced through Bizerte in the final offensive of the Tunisia campaign, and the 334th Division of the Wehrmacht surrendered to the Allies.  they entered Tunisia and Bizerte, freeing the imprisoned and sating the hungry and drowning the oppressors in Cape Bon.[28] One of the northernmost points in Tunisia.  2 And the flags of the Americans, the Brits, and the French brought light to those cities, and the flags of the Nazis and the fascists were trampled to the ground. 3 And in Tunisia the fortress the Allies killed and destroyed about two hundred and fifty thousand men.

ד שְׁנֵ֣ים עָשָׂ֗ר שָׂרֵ֤י הַצָּבָא֙ לָכְד֔וּ וּבְנִשְׁקָ֖ם שָׁלְח֥וּ אֶת־יָדָֽם
וְאֶת־דוֹרְנִ֨יתְז
וְאֶת־וֵ֝יבֵּיר
וְאֶת־מַאנְת֣וֹפֵיל ׀
וְאֶת־קרַ֣וּז
וְאֶת־מִ֗יץ
וְאֶת־בְּרָ֨וְאק
וְאֶת־פוֹן־אַרְנִ֤ים
וְאֶת־פוֹן־בּוֹרִישְׁת֙
וְאֶת־בורויתסז בּוֹרְוִ֔יתְס
וְאֶת־נוֹפֵ֥יר
וְאֶת־בּוֹלוֹבִ֖יס
וְאֶת־בְּמוֹזֽוֹנְז׃
4 Twelve officers of the army they captured and confiscated their weapons:
Dönitz[29] The translator is uncertain as to the identity of this person. Ḥazan and Ḥitin-Mashiaḥ suggest Karl Dönitz, an admiral and the successor to Adolf Hitler, but he was not captured or killed in Africa.  
and Weber[30] Friedrich Weber, commander of the 334th Division of the Wehrmacht. Ḥazan and Ḥitin-Mashiaḥ suggest Klaas Carel Faber, firing squad commander at the Westerbork concentration camp, but he was not captured or killed in Africa, and the Hebrew is spelled with a vav rather than a peh.  
and Manteuffel[31] Hasso Eccard von Manteuffel, second commander of the Division von Broich/von Manteuffel  
and Krause[32] Fritz Krause, commander of the 334th Division of the Wehrmacht after Weber. Ḥazan and Ḥitin-Mashiaḥ suggest Bernhard Krause, SS captain, but he was not captured or killed in Africa.  
and Mitz[33] The translator is uncertain as to the identity of this person. Ḥazan and Ḥitin-Mashiaḥ suggest Rochus Misch, a high-ranking SS figure, but he was not captured or killed in Africa.  
and Broich[34] Friedrich Freiherr von Broich, first commander of the Division von Broich/von Manteuffel. Ḥazan and Ḥitin-Mashiaḥ suggest Viltor Brack, SS official, but he was not captured or killed in Africa.  
and von Arnim[35] Hans-Jürgen von Arnim, commander of Army Group Africa  
and von Vaerst[36] Gustav von Vaerst, commander of the 5th Panzer Army  
and Borowietz[37] Willibald Borowietz, commander of the 15th Panzer Division  
and Neuffer[38] Georg Neuffer, Luftwaffe general  
and Bülowius[39] Karl Bülowius, commander of the Panzer Army Africa Engineering Squad  
and Bemossons.[40] The translator is uncertain as to the identity of this person, or the vocalization of his name. Ḥazan and Ḥitin-Mashiaḥ only write that there is a lack of identifying information.  

ה וַיָּנ֥וּחוּ הָאַלְיֵ֖י מִסְפַּ֣ר יָמִ֑ים וַיַּעַבְרוּ֙ לִגְבוּל֣וֹת אִיטָ֔אלְיָא וַיִּכְבְּשׁ֖וּ אַרְבָּעָ֥ה אִיִּֽים׃ ו דְּע֣וּ לָכֶ֪ם נָ֠אזִ֟ים֩ וּפָאסִ֡יסְת עם [אִ֕ם] לְכַלּ֛וֹת הָעָ֥ם הַיְּהוּדִ֖י חֲשַׁבְתֶּ֑ם וְכָעֵת֩ הִתְחַלתֶּ֨ם לִנְפּ֤וֹל לְפָנָיו֙ לֹא־תּוּכְל֣וּ ל֔וֹ כִּי־נָפ֥וֹל תִּפְּל֖וּ לְפָנָֽיו׃ ז עָלֵ֨ינוּ לְקַיֵּ֜ם לִהְי֣וֹת עוֹשִׂ֗ים אֶת־י֨וֹם הַיְשׁוּעָ֤ה הַזֶּה֙ בִּזְמַ֔נּוֹ בְּאַחַ֤ד עָשָׂר֙ לְנוֹבֵ֔אמְבֶּר כַּיָּמִ֨ים שֶׁנָּ֥חוּ בָּהֶ֛ם הַיְּהוּדִ֖ים מֵהָמָ֑ן וְהַחֹ֗דֶשׁ שֶׁנֶּהְפַּ֨ךְ לָ֤נוּ מִיָּגוֹן֙ לְשִׂמְחָ֔ה לַעֲשׂ֨וֹת בּ֤וֹ יוֹם֙ מִשְׁתֶּ֣ה וְשִׂמְחָ֔ה וּמַתָּנ֖וֹת לָֽאֶבְיֹנִֽים׃ ח וּנְקַבֵּ֥ל עָלֵ֖ינוּ הַדָּבָ֣ר הַזֶּ֑ה כַּאֲשֶׁ֨ר קִבְּל֤וּ עֲלֵיהֶם֙ אַחֵ֔ינוּ דִּבְרֵ֖י מׇרְדֳּכַֽי׃ ט וְכׇל־מַעֲשֵׂ֤י תׇּקְפָּם֙ וּגְב֣וּרָתָ֔ם שֶׁ֖ל הָאַלְיֵ֑י הֲלֹא־הֵ֣ם כְּתוּבִ֗ים עַל־סֵ֙פֶר֙ דִּבְרֵ֣י הַיָּמִ֔ים שֶׁ֖ל כׇּל־הָעַמִּֽים׃ י כִּ֣י ׀ הָעָ֣ם הַיְּהוּדִ֗י עַם֙ שָׁקֵ֔ט וְרוֹדֵ֖ף צֶ֑דֶק דּוֹבֵ֥ר טוֹב֙ לְעַמּ֔וֹ וְדוֹרֵ֛שׁ לִחְי֥וֹת בְּשָׁל֖וֹם עִם־שְׁכֵנָֽיו׃ יא וְהַמִּקְרֶ֣ה הַטּ֗וֹב רָצָה֩ שֶׁאַחַ֨ד עָשָׂ֤ר לְנוֹבֵ֙אמְבֶּר֙ יוֹם־נִצְח֣וֹן הַצָּרְפַתִּ֔ים יִהְיֶ֛ה לְחַ֥ג גָּד֖וֹל וְקָב֑וּעַ וְעַתָּ֖ה נִכְפְּלָ֥ה הַשִּׂמחָֽה׃
5 And the Allies rested a number of days, and passed to the borders of Italy, and conquered four cities. 6  Know this, Nazis and fascists: if you have schemed to destroy the Jewish people, at the time you begin to fall before them you will not defeat them, for you will fall, fall before them. 7 It is upon us to fulfill, to be making this day of salvation in its time, on the eleventh of November, like the days when the Jews rested from Haman, and the month when it was reversed for us from sadness to joy, to make of it a day of feasting and joy and gifts to the needy. 8 And the matter is accepted upon us, just as our brethren accepted upon them the words of Mordechai. 9 And all the mighty and glorious deeds of the Allies, are they not written in the book of the chronicles of all the peoples? 10 For the Jewish people is a tranquil people, pursuing justice, doing good for their people, and seeking to live in peace with their neighbors. 11 And if fortune wills it, the eleventh of November, Armistice Day for the French, will be a great and permanent festival, and now our joy is doubled.

בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה מוֹשִׁיעֵֽנוּ הָרָב אֶת־רִיבֵֽנוּ וְהַלּוֹחֵם לוֹחֲמֵֽינוּ וְגוֹאֲלֵֽנוּ מִכׇּל־צָרָה וָנֵֽזֶק׃ בָּרוּךְ אַתָּה הָאֵל הָעוֹנֶה לְעַמּוֹ יִשְׂרָאֵל בְּכׇל־צָרוֹתָיו׃
Blessed are You, our Savior, who argues our arguments and fights our wars and redeems us from all stress and damage. Blessed are You, the God who answers Your people in all its stresses.

אָרוּר הִיטְלֶיר
אָרוּר מוּסוֹלִֽינִי
אָרוּר טוֹיוֹ
אָרוּר הִימְלֶיר
אָרוּר גּוֹרִינְג
אָרוּר גּוֹבֶּילְס
אָרוּר הֵיץ
אָרוּר דַּארְקְיֵי דוּ פֵּילֵפּוּאַ
אֲרוּרִים כׇּל־הָרְשָׁעִים
Cursed be Hitler!
Cursed be Mussolini!
Cursed be Tojo![41] Hideki Tojo, prime minister of Japan 
Cursed be Himmler!
Cursed be Goering!
Cursed be Goebbels!
Cursed be Hess![42] Rudolf Hess, Nazi official and architect of the Nuremberg Laws 
Cursed be Darquier de Pellepoix![43] Louis Darquier de Pellepoix, Commissioner-General for Jewish Affairs under the Vichy Régime 
Cursed be all the evil!

בָּרוּךְ רוּזֵוֵוילְט
בָּרוּךְ סוּרְסִיל
בָּרוּךְ סְתָאלִין
בָּרוּךְ דּוּ גּוֹל
בָּרוּךְ גִּירוֹ
בָּרוּךְ תְֵּשַׁאנְג קַיי שֵׁיק
בְּרוּכִים כׇּל־יִשְׂרָאֵל
בְּרוּכִים כׇּל־אוֹהֲבֵי צֶדֶק
וְגַם גֵּינֵרָאל קַאתְרוֹ זָכוּר לְטוֹב׃
Blessed be Roosevelt!
Blessed be Churchill!
Blessed be Stalin!
Blessed be Du Gaulle!
Blessed be Giraud![44] Henri Honoré Giraud, French general and a leader of the Free French Forces 
Blessed be Chiang Kai-Shek!
Blessed be all Israel!
Blessed be all lovers of justice!
And also may General Catroux[45] Georges Catroux, Free French general  be remembered for good!

מִסְפַּר פְּסוּקֵי הַמְּגִילָּה קי׳׳א
וְסִימָנֶיךָ קַוֵּה אֵל יי
וְהַחֵצִי יָצְאוּ לִקְרָאת הַשׁוֹדֵד
The number of verses in this scroll[46] In keeping with Ḥassin’s opening declaration that “this scroll should not be considered a scroll of comedy and laughter, but a serious, real scroll,” he here includes a pseudo-Masoretic note at the end, in the manner found at the end of Biblical codices.  is 111,
and your mnemonic is Trust[47] The Hebrew word for “trust,” kaveh, has a gematria count of 111  in YHVH,
and the halfway point is: “and went out to meet that robber.”[48] Find note (#19) re: “robber” at the midway point of the scroll. 

Megillat Hitler was written by Asher (Prosper) Hassine. The text was transcribed, pointed, and cantillated by Isaac Gantwerk Mayer consulting the original text and the pointed edition prepared by Dr. Ephraim Hazan. This original translation, also by Isaac Gantwerk Mayer, is the first ever English translation made of this work. (A French translation by Claire Drevon was published in Revue d’Histoire de la Shoah 2016/2 (№ 205), pp.177-185.) –Aharon Varady

 

Notes

Notes
1 Yehuda haNasi
2 on 15 Kislev
3 on 26 Kislev
4 AKA Mendele Moykher-Sforim. Mendele is well known today for his Yiddish writing, but he was also a major figure in the revitalization of Hebrew as a literary language, thus his citation by a proud Hebraist like Asher P. Ḥassin.
5 on 23 Kislev
6 The first of many references to the idea that the Nazis are descendants of Amalek through Agag, Haman’s people. This could be taken as metaphorical, since Amalek is often used as a representation for genocidal evil. It could also be taken as a literal claim that the Nazis are descendants of Amalek, or at the very least showed extreme sympathies towards the Amalekites as the victims of Jewish violence. One Nazi who can be said to have referenced this idea was Adolf Hitler. “In a speech by Hitler on January 30, 1944, he said that, if the Nazis went down to defeat, the Jews could celebrate ‘a second triumphant Purim’” (as quoted in “The Prophecy of Hitler,” in The Purim Anthology, ed. Philip Goodman, JPS 1949).
7 The translator is uncertain as to the source of this quote. Anyone who recognizes the quote and can identify the writer, please leave a comment!
8 Victor Emmanuel III, king of Italy during the fascist period
9 Hermann Goering, grand marshal of the Wehrmacht
10 Joseph Goebbels, minister of propaganda
11 Joachim von Ribbentrop, minister of foreign affairs
12 Unclear. Ephraim Ḥazan and Raḥel Ḥitin-Mashiaḥ, in their work “The Hitler Scroll — on the miracle and rescue of North African Jews in World War II“ (which has been very useful to the translator) suggest Fedor von Bock, general field marshal.
13 Robert Ley, head of the German Labor Front
14 Heinrich Himmler, head of the SS
15 Find note (#6) above re: Amalek.
16 Find note (#6) above re: Himmler
17 A town in Czechoslovakia which was completely destroyed on June 10, 1942 in retaliation for the assassination of Reinhard Heydrich.
18 Find note (#6) above re: Amalek
19 This word is emphasized in the original scroll because, according to Ḥassin’s pseudo-masoretric count, it is the central word of the entire scroll.
20 The first month!? Tishrei is the seventh month! The original scroll refers to it as the first month, probably because it’s the first month after the new year. But everywhere else in the scroll months are counted the Biblical way, with the first month being Nisan.
21 Find note (#6) above re: Amalek
22 An original coinage of the author, a reflexive verb form of the root “Nazi”
23 This scroll does not mention the attack on Pearl Harbor, probably because of its focus on the European war.
24 This phrase (just one word in Hebrew) is emphasized in the original scroll to clarify that the rest of this chapter is an authorial indulgence. Find the Introduction.
25 11 November 1942, Allied victory in the Second Battle of El Alamein and the beginning of the Western Desert Campaign.
26 Several cities in North Africa — all but one in Tunisia. Tripoli (in Libya) was taken on 23 January 1943. Gabès was taken 28 March 1943. Sousse, Sfax, and Kairouan were all taken between 10 and 12 April 1943.
27 8 May 1943, when Allied forces advanced through Bizerte in the final offensive of the Tunisia campaign, and the 334th Division of the Wehrmacht surrendered to the Allies.
28 One of the northernmost points in Tunisia.
29 The translator is uncertain as to the identity of this person. Ḥazan and Ḥitin-Mashiaḥ suggest Karl Dönitz, an admiral and the successor to Adolf Hitler, but he was not captured or killed in Africa.
30 Friedrich Weber, commander of the 334th Division of the Wehrmacht. Ḥazan and Ḥitin-Mashiaḥ suggest Klaas Carel Faber, firing squad commander at the Westerbork concentration camp, but he was not captured or killed in Africa, and the Hebrew is spelled with a vav rather than a peh.
31 Hasso Eccard von Manteuffel, second commander of the Division von Broich/von Manteuffel
32 Fritz Krause, commander of the 334th Division of the Wehrmacht after Weber. Ḥazan and Ḥitin-Mashiaḥ suggest Bernhard Krause, SS captain, but he was not captured or killed in Africa.
33 The translator is uncertain as to the identity of this person. Ḥazan and Ḥitin-Mashiaḥ suggest Rochus Misch, a high-ranking SS figure, but he was not captured or killed in Africa.
34 Friedrich Freiherr von Broich, first commander of the Division von Broich/von Manteuffel. Ḥazan and Ḥitin-Mashiaḥ suggest Viltor Brack, SS official, but he was not captured or killed in Africa.
35 Hans-Jürgen von Arnim, commander of Army Group Africa
36 Gustav von Vaerst, commander of the 5th Panzer Army
37 Willibald Borowietz, commander of the 15th Panzer Division
38 Georg Neuffer, Luftwaffe general
39 Karl Bülowius, commander of the Panzer Army Africa Engineering Squad
40 The translator is uncertain as to the identity of this person, or the vocalization of his name. Ḥazan and Ḥitin-Mashiaḥ only write that there is a lack of identifying information.
41 Hideki Tojo, prime minister of Japan
42 Rudolf Hess, Nazi official and architect of the Nuremberg Laws
43 Louis Darquier de Pellepoix, Commissioner-General for Jewish Affairs under the Vichy Régime
44 Henri Honoré Giraud, French general and a leader of the Free French Forces
45 Georges Catroux, Free French general
46 In keeping with Ḥassin’s opening declaration that “this scroll should not be considered a scroll of comedy and laughter, but a serious, real scroll,” he here includes a pseudo-Masoretic note at the end, in the manner found at the end of Biblical codices.
47 The Hebrew word for “trust,” kaveh, has a gematria count of 111
48 Find note (#19) re: “robber” at the midway point of the scroll.

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