בסיעתא דשמיא

עלת תמיד | Olath Tamid: Gebetbuch Für Israelitische Reform-Gemeinden, by David Einhorn (3rd German ed. 1862)

Rabbi David Einhorn’s prayer book `Olat Tamid (lit. the perpetual sacrifice)…first penned in Germany, served as the model for the Union Prayer Book,….the prayer book of the American Reform movement for almost eight decades. It reflected what is now called “classical Reform,” eliminating prayers for the restoration of Zion, mentions of the messiah, and bodily resurrection of the dead, while diminishing mentions of Jewish chosenness and the like. This is עלת תמיד Olath Tamid by Rev. Dr. David Einhorn (1809-1878), in its expanded German/Hebrew edition (1862), the third edition after its initial publication in 1856. . . .

An Illustrated Kabbalat Shabbat Siddur with Drawings by Daniel Nebenzahl

There are many illustrated siddurim for children. This Illustrated Kabbalat Shabbat Siddur is an illustrated siddur (in Hebrew) for grownups. The purpose of this siddur is to inspire us during prayer, to help us create and maintain Kavana. I chose to create this siddur for Kabbalat Shabbat, since usually at Kabbalat Shabbat we are more relaxed and open. The siddur has all that is needed (Nusaḥ Sefarad) for the Friday night prayers (Minḥah, Kabbalat Shabbat, and Arvit). The drawings accompany Kabbalat Shabbat. . . .

עלת תמיד | Olath Tamid: Book of Prayers for Israelitish Congregations, by David Einhorn (1st English ed. 1872)

Rabbi David Einhorn’s (1809-1878) prayer book `Olat Tamid (lit. the perpetual sacrifice)…first penned in Germany, served as the model for the Union Prayer Book,….the prayer book of the American Reform movement for almost eight decades. It reflected what is now called “classical Reform,” eliminating prayers for the restoration of Zion, mentions of the messiah, and bodily resurrection of the dead, while diminishing mentions of Jewish chosenness and the like. . . .

סדור לבנת הספיר לקבלת שבת | Siddur Livnat HaSapir l’Kabbalat Shabbat, a Friday Night Siddur by Aharon Varady

Siddur Livnat HaSapir l’Kabbalat Shabbat is a complete prayerbook (siddur) for welcoming the Shabbat on nearly all Friday evenings. This is the personal prayerbook of Aharon Varady, containing his idiosyncratic preferences in liturgical custom and aesthetic presentation. . . .

סדר עבודת הלב שחרית | Seder Avodat Lev Shaḥarit: Service of the Heart by the farmers of the Adamah Fellowship

DOWNLOAD: PDF | ODT | TXT

(For an earlier version of the Seder Avodat Lev pre-2016: PDF, ODT, TXT.)

Source (Hebrew) Transliteration Translation (English) מוֹדָה/מוֹדֶה אֲנִי לְפָנֶיךָ רוּחַ חַי וְקַיָּם׃ Modeh/Modah Ani lefanekha ruaḥ ḥai v’kayam I am grateful before You living and enduring spirit.[1]Variation on Shulḥan Arukh ch. 1 by Moshe Ibn Makhir from . . .

תפלה שפת ישראל | Tefiloh Sefas Yisroel, a nusaḥ Ashkenaz siddur dedicated to the memory of the Bad Homburg Jewish community

It started as a project to compile a siddur that I could daven from. Living in Chicago, most of the siddurim which are available are Artscroll, Birnbaum, etc. Just to try and find a Rodelheim, or Baer’s Avodat Yisroel is nearly impossible. That was about twelve years ago. . . .

שבת | The Seder Tefillah for Shabbat and Yom Tov of Kehillat Kol Haneshama, Jerusalem

The evening service for entering Shabbat and Yom Tov as is the custom of Kehillat Kol Haneshama in south Jerusalem, Israel. . . .

Siddur Tehillat Hashem Yidaber Pi by Rabbi Zalman Schachter-Shalomi

If you are not used to reading Hebrew with comprehension and with the ability to dilate the Hebrew from the literal meaning, or if you cannot read Hebrew and need a resource for daily davvenen, I offer you this set of texts, which I, too, use frequently for myself. I translated the Psalms and the liturgy in the way in which I experience them in my feeling consciousness. This does not offer the ‘pshat’, the literal meaning of the words, but the devotional interpretation that can make it a prayer of the heart. . . .

תפלת מנחה לשבת | Shabbat Minḥah Prayers by Dr. Jakob J. Petuchowski, 1966

This prayer-leaflet was primarily intended for a group of Hebrew Union College students who met every sabbath afternoon for extra-curricular (noncredit) Torah study with Dr. Rabbi Jakob Petuchowki in the mid-1960s. Their service was conducted entirely in Hebrew and in the traditional nusaḥ with some minor but interesting Liberal innovations. Petuchowki writes, “We have omitted only the various repetitions as well as the prayer for the restoration of the sacrificial service. (But we have retained the place of Zion as the symbol of the messianic hope.) In the ‘Alenu prayer, we have preferred a positive formulation of the “Election of Israel” to the traditional negative one.” . . .

הסדור השלם | Ha-Siddur Ha-Shalem, The Daily Prayerbook by Paltiel Birnbaum (Hebrew Publishing Company, 1949)

Ha-Siddur Ha-Shalem (The [Complete] Daily Prayer Book), translated and arranged by Paltiel Birnbaum, was widely used in Orthodox and Conservative synagogues until the late 1980s and remains a favorite prayerbook for many who grew up using it. First published by the Hebrew Publishing Company in 1949 under their copyright, this siddur is in the Public . . .

ספר תפילות לשבת | Sabbath Prayer Book by Rabbi Mordecai Kaplan (1945)

Arranged and translated by Rabbi Mordecai Kaplan, the Sabbath Prayer Book is the first Reconstructionist prayerbook we know of to have entered the Public Domain. (The prayerbook entered the Public Domain due to lack of copyright renewal by the copyright owner listed in the copyright notice, the Jewish Reconstructionist Foundation, as evidenced in the Stanford Copyright Renewal database.) . . .

סידור פרחי | Siddur Farḥi by Dr. Hillel Farḥi (ca. 1913)

Join us in creating a faithful digital transcription of the Siddur Farḥi (Hillel Farḥi, 1917), a nusaḥ sepharadi, minhag Egypt siddur. After transcription and proofreading, this new digital edition will be shared under a Creative Commons Zero (CC0) Public Domain dedication. The edition will then be encoded in TEI XML and archived in the Open Siddur database, a libre Open Access liturgy database. We are grateful to Alain Farḥi for imaging this Public Domain work and providing a digital copy for this effort. . . .

סידור עבודת ישראל | Siddur Aḅodath Yisrael, 2nd revised edition (1873) arranged by R’ Benjamin Szold and translated by R’ Marcus Jastrow

The siddur, Aḅodath Yisrael was first prepared for Temple Oheb Shalom (Baltimore, Maryland) by Rabbi Benjamin Szold (1829-1902). Before Szold’s arrival in 1859, the congregation had adopted for use in its Shabbat service the Minhag America by the Reform rabbi, Isaac Meyer Wise. After much discussion with his congregation Szold introduced Aḅodath Yisrael, which hewed more closely to traditional Ashkenazi custom. The first edition of this prayer-book appeared in 1863 with German translation, and was widely adopted by congregations in the United States. New editions were published in 1864 and 1865 (the latter with English translation), and another, revised edition in 1871, by Rabbis Marcus Jastrow of Philadelphia (1829-1903) and Henry Hochheimer of Baltimore (1818-1912). . . .

Transcribing a critical text of the Nusaḥ Ashkenaz, Seder Avodat Yisroel by Isaac Seligman Baer (1868)

Join us in creating a faithful digital transcription of the Seder Avodat Yisrael (Isaac Seligman Baer, 1868), a critical text of the nusaḥ Ashkeanaz. After transcription and proofreading, this new digital edition will be shared under a Creative Commons Zero (CC0) Public Domain dedication. The edition will then be encoded in TEI XML and archived in the Open Siddur database, a libre Open Access liturgy database. . . .

סידור תורה אור | Siddur Torah Ohr: the Nusaḥ Ha-ARI according to Rav Schneur Zalman of Lyadi

When Rav Yiztḥak Luria, zt”l, also known as the Holy Ari, davvened in Eretz Yisroel he brought about a series of liturgical innovations witnessed in later siddurim. His particular nusaḥ bridged minhag Ashkenaz and minhag Sefarad (the customs of the Rheinland Jews and the customs of the Jews of the Iberian Peninsula) with the teachings of his school of Kabbalists. When two centuries later, the Ḥassidic movement blossomed in Eastern Europe, it found purchase in Lithuania among a mystical school centered around Rav Schneur Zalman of Lyady, the Alter Rebbe and founder of the ḤaBaD movement within Ḥassidism. The Alter Rebbe compiled his own siddur, the Siddur Torah Ohr, “according to the tradition of the Ari.” . . .

נוסח אנגליה | The Nusaḥ of the Jews of England in 1287

The nusaḥ of the Jews of England before the expulsion is witnessed in a single text written by Jacob Jehudah Hazzan of London in 1287. The text is currently held in the collection of the library of the University of Leipzig. We are grateful to the library for making available to us a scan of just pages in the work containing the seder tefilot — something unavailable to its first transcriber (to which our digital edition is indebted). In April 1962, the former chief rabbi of the British Empire Israel Brodie published his transcription through Mossad haRav Kook, writing “The Etz Hayyim is the most notable and certainly the most voluminous of the literary productions of mediaeval Anglo-Jewry which have survived. It was written in 1287, three years before the Expulsion. The author of whom very little is known, wrote this comprehensive code of religious law based on the Mishneh Torah of Maimonides, on the Sefer Mitzvot Gedolot of Moses of Coucy and of many other rabbinic authorities some of whom are otherwise unknown. Included among his authorities are Talmudists — some of renown, who flourished in England. The Etz Hayyim appears to have been regarded as an authoritative source of Jewish Law, judging by references to it contained in works which will be listed in my full introduction. Though it was not quoted as frequently as other works of a similar nature, it takes its place among the Rishonim. David Kauffman in the Jewish Quarterly Review, Vol. IV, pages 20—63, 550—561, and Vol. V pages 353—374 gave a detailed description and appraisal of the Etz Hayyim. The full publication of the work, will, I am sure, provide scholars with additional and varied data which will justify the labour and time involved in its preparation and editing.” . . .

Siddur Nusaḥ Ereṣ Yisrael – Minḥa, Birkat HaMazon, Tefillat HaDerekh

This is a compact siddur for weekday Minḥa according to Nusaḥ Ereṣ Yisrael, as derived from rulings of the Jerusalem Talmud, fragments found in the Cairo Geniza and other historical documents. This siddur also includes Birkat HaMazon (Grace After Meals) and Tefillat HaDerekh (Travelers’ Prayer). Modern additions to the ancient prayers include special verses for Yom Yerushalayim (Jerusalem Liberation Day) and Yom HaAṣmaut (Israeli Independence Day), additions which keep the nusaḥ at once uniquely ancient, yet thoroughly connected to our modern reality here in the Land Of Israel. . . .

The Samaritan Liturgy in two volumes (transcribed by A.E. Cowley)

Arthur Earnest Cowley’s transcription of a 13th or 14th century manuscript of an Israelite-Samaritan defter held in the Vatican library (V 3. Ff. 193, vellum, sm. 4to.). Besides prayers, the second volume also contains an introduction, list of manuscripts used, and a glossary of terms in Samaritan Aramaic, among other materials. . . .


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