Haftarah Reading for Parashat Vayera (II Kings 4:1-37): Chantable English translation with trope, by Len Fellman

The hafatarah reading for Parashat Vayera in English translation, transtropilized. . . .

Haftarah Reading for Parashat Lekh Lekha (Isaiah 40:27-41:16): Chantable English translation with trope, by Len Fellman

The hafatarah reading for Parashat Lekh Lekha in English translation, transtropilized. . . .

Haftarah Reading for Parashat Noaḥ (Isaiah 54:1-55:5): Chantable English translation with trope, by Len Fellman

The hafatarah reading for Parashat Noaḥ in English Translation, transtropilized. . . .

Haftarah Reading for Parashat Bereshit (Isaiah 42:5-43:10): Chantable English translation with trope, by Len Fellman

The hafatarah reading for Parashat Bereishit in English Translation, transtropilized. . . .

Haftarah Reading for Yom Kippur morning (Isaiah 57:14-58:14): Chantable English translation with trope, by Len Fellman

This is an English translation of the Haftarah reading for Yom Kippur (Isaiah 57:14-58:14), transtropilized (a term coined by Fellman to describe texts where the Masoretic cantillation has been applied to the translation). . . .

Haftarah Readings for the first day (1 Samuel 1:1-2:10) and second day (Jeremiah 31:1-19) of Rosh Hashanah: Chantable English translation with trope, by Len Fellman

This is an English translation of the Haftarah readings for Rosh Hashanah, transtropilized (a term coined by Fellman to describe texts where the Masoretic cantillation has been applied to the translation). . . .

Haftarah Reading for Yom Kippur morning (Isaiah 57:14-58:14), a slightly midrashic translation by Arthur O. Waskow

As we move not just toward a new “year” (shanah) but toward a moment when repetition (sheni) becomes transformation (shinui), I hope we will remember the roots of Jewish renewal in the upheavals of the 1960s as well as the upheavals of the 1760s, the roots of Judaism in the great “political” speeches of the Prophets, and the teachings of Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel, who said that in a great civil rights march his legs were praying, and who argued again and again that “spirituality” and “politics” cannot be severed. As Heschel also said, “Prayer is meaningless unless it is subversive.” . . .


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