☞   //   Public Readings, Sources, and Cantillation   //   Festival & Fast Day Readings   //   Readings for Days in Jewish Calendars   //   Purim Sheni Readings

☞   Purim Sheni Readings

This is an archive of prayers and song written for a Purim Sheni, a secondary Purim. In many Jewish communities around the world, “local Purims” celebrating the survival of specific communities are made which include the retelling of stories of their redemption under chilling circumstances.

Click here to contribute a reading you have written, translated, or transcribed for a Purim Sheni.


Looking for something else?

For public readings selected for Purim, visit here.

For public readings selected for Taanit Esther, go here.

מְגִילַּת הִיטְלֶיר | Megilat Hitler, a Purim Sheni scroll for French Armistice Day by Asher P. Ḥassine (Casablanca, 1944)

A megillah attesting to the terrible events of World War II from the vantage of North African Jewry in Casablanca. . . .

מגילת לינקון | Megillat Lincoln, a Purim Sheni scroll for the 13th of Tevet commemorating the revocation of Ulysses S. Grant’s General Order № 11

A megillah for a Purim Sheni commemorating a day of salvation the Jewry of the United States during the Civil War. . . .

מְגִלַּת פִּסְגָּה | Megillat Fustat, a Purim Sheni legend for the 28th of Adar translated and cantillated by Isaac Gantwerk Mayer

Behold, a full text of the Megillah of Fustat, telling a story of a great miracle that happened in 1524 CE (5284 AM). . . .

מְגִלַּת שַׂאֲרָגוֹשָׂה | Megillat Saragossa, a Purim Sheni legend for the 17th of Shevat translated and cantillated by Isaac Gantwerk Mayer

The Megillat Saragossa, also known as the Megillat Syracusa, in Hebrew and English, to be read on the 17th of Sh’vat. . . .

מְגִלַּת וָשִׁעְתּוֹן | Megillat Washington: A Scroll for Thanksgiving Day, by Isaac Gantwerk Mayer (1790, 2018)

In many Jewish communities around the world, there have been traditional scrolls read for “local Purims,” celebrating redemptions for a specific community. Here in America, we don’t really have an equivalent to that. But we do have Thanksgiving, a day heavily inspired by Biblical traditions of celebration, and one long associated with all that is good about America. Some Jewish communities have a tradition on Thanksgiving of reading Washington’s letter to the Jews of Newport, where he vows to support freedom of religion, famously writing that the United States “gives to bigotry no sanction, to persecution no assistance” – thus rephrasing words originally written in a prior letter by Moses Seixas (say-shas), the sexton of the Touro Synagogue in Newport. This text includes the original English of both Moses Seixas’ letter to Washington and Washington’s return, as well as a somewhat simplified version of the story of Washington’s visit to Newport. Inspired largely by the style of the Book of Esther, it could be read on Thanksgiving morning during the service, using Esther melodies (or going on detours as per personal choice). . . .