tagged: אלהי נשמה Elohai neshamah

 

Who Can’t Breathe? Three Outcries and a Prayer, by Rabbi Arthur Waskow (the Shalom Center 2021)

A prayer-poem by Rabbi Arthur Waskow in 2021 reflecting on our difficulty breathing, as a society, as humanity, and as a interconnected, interbreathing biosphere. . . .

I can’t breathe, We can’t breathe, Earth can’t breathe, a prayer-poem by Rabbi Arthur Waskow (the Shalom Center 2020)

A prayer-poem by Rabbi Arthur Waskow reflecting on our difficulty breathing, as a society, as humanity, and as a interconnected, interbreathing biosphere. . . .

אלהי נשמה | Elohai Neshamah, adapted by Yael Schweid & Rabbi Ofer Sabath Beit-Halachmi (2009)

An adaptation of the prayer Elohai Neshama in honor of a bar mitsvah. . . .

אֱלֹהַי נְשָׁמָה | Elohai Neshamah, a rhyming translation by Alice Lucas (1898)

A rhyming translation of Elohai Neshamah. . . .

אֱלֹהַי נְשָׁמָה | Elohai Neshamah, a paraliturgical reflection by Rabbi Shoshana Meira Friedman

A paraliturgical reflection on the prayer over being animated with life sustaining breath, Elohai Neshamah, for a shame resilience practice. . . .

תפילה להתחדש | A Prayer for Renewal, by Hillel Zeitlin

This prayer by Hillel Zeitlin was published as “That We Be Reborn” with an English translation by Eugene Kohn in the Sabbath Prayer Book (Jewish Reconstructionist Foundation 1945) of Rabbi Mordecai Kaplan. I have slightly modified Kohn’s translation by replacing thee and thou with you and your, etc. Zeitlin’s prayer is undated and likely was published earlier and elsewhere. If you have more information on the original publication of this prayer, please contact us or leave a comment. . . .

Reggeli ima | Gebet am Morgen | Morning Prayer, a paraliturgical Elohai Neshamah by Rabbi Arnold Kiss (1897)

This prayer by Rabbi Arnold Kiss for the well-being of a husband by their wife, “A nő imája férjéért,” was first published in his anthology of prayers for Jewish women, Mirjam (1897) on p.246-248. It doesn’t appear to me to have been translated in the subsequent German edition (1907). I’ve set my English translation side-by-side with the Magyar. –Aharon Varady . . .