Seven Hoshanot for Creation, by Rabbi David Seidenberg (neohasid.org)

A litany of hoshanot for use in a ritual prayer circle march on the festival of Sukkot. . . .

A Hoshana for Our Planet, by Rabbi David Seidenberg (neohasid.org)

A litany of hoshanot for use in a ritual prayer circle march on the festival of Sukkot. . . .

סידור עֹלת תמיד (אשכנז)‏ | Siddur Olas Tamid, derived by Aaron Wolf (2018) from Tefiloh Sefas Yisroel by Rallis Wiesenthal (2010)

Siddur Olas Tamid is a Hebrew-only, nusaḥ Ashkenaz siddur compiled by Aaron Wolf and shared under a Creative Commons Attribution license. Based upon the Siddur Tefilos Sefos Yisroel compiled by R’ Rallis Wiesenthal, Siddur Olas Tamid was laid out and formatted in open-source XeLaTeX code shared from Aaron Wolf’s github account. . . .

תפלה שפת ישראל (אשכנז)‏ | Tefiloh Sefas Yisroel (minhag Bad Homburg), compiled by R’ Rallis Wiesenthal (2010)

An authentic siddur of Ashkenazic holy congregations without the changes made by later grammarians and maskilim, prepared by Rabbi Rallis Wiesenthal according to the minhag of Bad Homburg. . . .

Hoshanot Liturgy for the Climate Crisis, adapted by R’ Ezra Weinberg from the words of Greta Thunberg

The words of Greta Thunberg adapted for a prayer for intervention in the antroppgenic climate crisis, for a Honshana ritual for Sukkot. . . .

מגילת קהלת | Megillat Qohelet (Ecclesiastes): Chantable English translation with trōp, by Len Fellman

This is an English translation of Megillat Qohelet, (Kohelet/Ecclesiastes), transtropilized (a term coined by Fellman to describe texts where the Masoretic cantillation has been applied to the translation). This translation is based on the translations by H.L.Ginsberg, Stone Ed. Tanach, Jerusalem Bible, New King James Bible, and the JPS Tanach (both 1917 & 1999). This English translations is sung to the tropes by Len Fellman according to the melodies of Portnoy & Wolff. . . .

Haftarah Reading for the First Shabbat of Ḥanukkah (Zekharyah 2:14-4:7): Chantable English translation with trōp, by Len Fellman

The hafatarah reading for the first Shabbat of Ḥanukkah in English translation, transtropilized. . . .

Prayer of the Guest Chaplain of the U.S. Senate: Rabbi Stephen Baars on 22 May 2008

The Opening Prayer given in the U.S. Senate on 22 May 2008. . . .

Prayer of the Guest Chaplain of the U.S. House of Representatives: Rabbi Felipe Goodman on 3 June 2008

The Opening Prayer given in the U.S. House of Representatives on 30 June 2008. . . .

Prayer of the Guest Chaplain of the U.S. House of Representatives: Rabbi Stuart L. Berman on 17 July 2008

The Opening Prayer given in the U.S. House of Representatives on 17 July 2008. . . .

סדר עבודה ערבית לשבת ולשלוש רגלים | Seder Avodah Tefilat Arvit l’Shabbat u’l’Shalosh Regalim, arranged, translated, and transliterated by Rabbi Max D. Klein (1954)

A Friday and pilgrimage festival night siddur, translated with a unique transliteration schema devised by Rabbi Max D. (Meir David) Klein of Congregation Adath Jeshurun in Philadelphia, 1954. . . .

קדוש לסעודה מפסקת לפני יום הכפורים | Ḳiddush for the Seudah Mafseket before Yom Kippur, by Isaac Gantwerk Mayer

A kiddush for the se’udah (feast) preceding Yom Kippur and its fast. . . .

תיקון לערב יום הכיפורים | Tiqun for Erev Yom Kippur, by Isaac Gantwerk Mayer

This Tikkun for Erev Yom Kippur is an assortment of texts, beginning with Torah and its targum, continuing with the Writings, then prophetic and psalmodic works, each accompanied by related Mishnaic passages from Tractate Yoma and surrounded by petitionary prayers in the manner of a traditional tikkun. It is meant to be studied in the nightly period after Kol Nidrei, either as a community or alone. . . .

Haftarah Reading for Parashat ha’Azinu (2 Samuel 22:1-51): Chantable English translation with trōp, by Len Fellman

The haftarah reading for Parashat ha’Azinu, in English translation, transtropilized. . . .

מגילת יונה | Megillat Yonah: Chantable English translation with trōp, by Len Fellman

A Megillah reading of Yonah with English translation, transtropilized. . . .

Haftarah Reading for Parashat Vayelekh (Hoshea 14:2-10, Mikhah 7:18-20, Yoel 2:15-27): Chantable English translation with trōp, by Len Fellman

The haftarah reading for Parashat Nitsavim, in English translation, transtropilized. . . .

בספר חיים (התחדשות יהודית)‏ | B’Sefer Ḥayyim: A Jewish Renewal/Reconstructionist Maḥzor for the Days of Awe (2016)

This is a complete* Jewish Renewal/Reconstructionist Machzor for Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur, primarily influenced by the davennin of Reb Zalman and the Aquarian Minyan. All text in English is gender-neutral. All Hebrew prayers are accompanied by transliteration. Material for Shabbat is at the back of the book. Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur prayers are combined (so some pages need to be skipped depending), but there should be a minimum of flipping back and forth. . . .

אחות קטנה במאה ה -21 | A 21st century “Aḥot Ḳetanah” (Little Sister), by Rabbi Dr. Raysh Weiss

A 21st century recasting of the iconic 13th century Spanish mystical Rosh haShanah piyyut. . . .

Torah Readings for the first day (Genesis 21:1-34) and second day (Genesis 22:1-24) of Rosh Hashanah: Chantable English translation with trōp, by Len Fellman

Transtropilation of an English translation for the first and second days of Rosh Hashanah, by Len Fellman. . . .

Torah Reading for Parashat v’Zot haBrakhah (Deuteronomy 33:1-34:12): Chantable English translation with trōp, by Len Fellman

A Torah reading of Parashat v’Zot haBrakhah in English translation, transtropilized. . . .

Torah Reading for Parashat Haazinu (Deuteronomy 32:1-52): Chantable English translation with trōp, by Len Fellman

A Torah reading of Parashat Haazinu in English translation, transtropilized. . . .

Children’s Prayer for the Recovery of our President [Dwight D. Eisenhower], by Rabbi Abraham Samuel Soltes (1955)

A prayer for the recovery of President Dwight D. Eisenhower following a severe heart attack in late September 1955. . . .

אֵלֶּה אֶזְכְּרָה, נוּסַח פִּיטְסְבּוּרְג | Eileh Ezkarah for Pittsburgh, by Rabbi Jonathan Perlman with Rabbi Tamar Elad-Applebaum and Rabbi Martin Cohen

A kinah for the martyrs of the Tree of Life synagogue massacre in Boston in 2018. . . .

סדר עבודה מחזור לימים נוראים (אשכנז)‏ | Seder Avodah Maḥzor l’Yamim Nora’im, arranged and translated by Rabbi Max D. Klein (1960)

A maḥzor for Rosh haShanah and Yom Kippur, prepared for a mid-20th century Conservative Jewish congregation in Philadelphia. . . .

Prayer of the Guest Chaplain of the U.S. House of Representatives: Rabbi Peter E. Hyman on 30 July 2008

The Opening Prayer given in the U.S. House of Representatives on 30 July 2008. . . .

המחזור לראש השנה ויום כּיפּור (אשכנז)‏ | Ha-Maḥzor for Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur, translated and arranged by Rabbi Ben-Zion Bokser (1959)

A prayer book ( maḥzor ) for the Jewish penitential holy days of Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur, translated and arranged by Rabbi Ben Zion Bokser (1907-1984). . . .

מודים דרבנן בלי מנין או אם לבד (אשכנז)‏ | Modim d’Rabbanan Replacement for when Praying Alone or Without a Minyan (Nusaḥ Ashkenaz), by Isaac Gantwerk Mayer

This text uses the passage for the Askenazi nusach of the Modim d’Rabbanan and incorporates it into an extended version of the Modim, slightly editing it so as to fit more appropriately and so as not to repeat the word “modim” (which is forbidden on the grounds of appearing, ḥas v’shalom, to pray to multiple deities—see Berakhot 33b). It was first written for a separate project by the editor (https://opensiddur.org/prayers/lunisolar/musaf/dukhening-in-a-musaf-amidah-after-a-heykhe-qedushah-by-isaac-gantwerk-mayer/) but here it can be found alone. It can be silently recited when praying alone or after a heykhe kedusha, to replace the first paragraph of the Modim prayer. . . .

ברכו בלי מנין או אם לבד (אשכנז)‏ | Barkhu replacement for when Praying Alone or Without a Minyan (Nusaḥ Ashkenaz), by Isaac Gantwerk Mayer

This replacement barkhu arranges multiple Biblical verses in a catena. It is introduced and closed with verses from the book of Neḥemiah, verses often considered the source for the custom of calling to prayer. In between are poetic texts from the Song of Deborah and from Psalms that direct the term “Barkhu” — the plural imperative “Bless ye!” — at God. It could be recited alone in the location where the Barkhu would traditionally be recited, or said aloud in a community when no minyan is available. Alternatively, it could be used WITH a minyan as a text to introduce the Barkhu, a new step in of a line of poetic introductions to the service written for multiple generations. . . .

קדיש יתום בלי מנין או אם לבד (אשכנז)‏ | Abbreviated, Personal Mourner’s Kaddish for when Praying Alone or Without a Minyan (Nusaḥ Ashkenaz), by Isaac Gantwerk Mayer

This text takes the basic idea of the Baladi-rite ‘Brikh Shmeh d’Kudsha Brikh Hu’ and adapts it for the Askenazi nusach of the Kaddish. It can be used when praying alone wherever a minyan would say the entire Kaddish. It could also be recited by a community in unison out loud when it can’t make a minyan, to show that even if we don’t have a full minyan, we still welcome mourners as part of our community. . . .

A Mini-Seliḥot, by Rabbi Menachem Creditor

One small request to accompany the seliḥot service. . . .

Torah Reading for Parashat Vayelekh (Deuteronomy 31:1-30): Chantable English translation with trōp, by Len Fellman

A Torah reading of Parashat Vayelekh in English translation, transtropilized. . . .

Torah Reading for Parashat Nitsavim (Deuteronomy 29:9-30:20): Chantable English translation with trōp, by Len Fellman

A Torah reading of Parashat Nitsavim in English translation, transtropilized. . . .

Haftarah Reading for Parashat Nitsavim (Isaiah 61:10-63:9): Chantable English translation with trōp, by Len Fellman

The haftarah reading for Parashat Nitsavim, in English translation, transtropilized. . . .

סדר תפילות ישראל (אשכנז)‏ | Seder Tefilot Yisrael: Sabbath and Festival Prayer Book, compiled by the Rabbinical Assembly & United Synagogue of America (1946)

The Rabbinical Assembly of America’s popular mid-20th century modern prayerbook for Conservative American Jewry based upon the work of Rabbi Morris Silverman. . . .

מחזור השלם לראש השנה (נוסח האר״י)‏ | Maḥzor ha-Shalem l’Rosh ha-Shanah, translated and arranged by Paltiel Birnbaum (1958)

A bilingual Hebrew-English maḥzor for Rosh Hashanah (“Sephardic-Ḥasidic”). . . .

מחזור השלם ליום כיפור (נוסח האר״י)‏ | Maḥzor ha-Shalem l’Yom Kippur, translated and arranged by Paltiel Birnbaum (1958)

A bilingual Hebrew-English maḥzor for Yom Kippur (“Sephardic-Ḥasidic”) from the mid- 20th century. . . .

מחזור השלם לראש השנה ויום כפור (אשכנז)‏ | Maḥzor ha-Shalem l’Rosh ha-Shanah v’Yom Kippur, translated and arranged by Paltiel Birnbaum (1951)

A bilingual Hebrew-English maḥzor for Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur (Ashkenaz). . . .

Transition Ritual Poems, by Joy Ladin

The transition ritual poems below are an effort to hear in the Torah the voices of the various parts of the trans self calling one another toward wholeness. . . .

ברכת המזון לסעודת ההבראה במוצאי תשעה באב | Birkat Hamazon additions for the Break Fast Meal after Tisha b’Av, by Gabriel Wasserman

Supplemental prayers for the Birkat Hamazon for the break fast meal after Tisha b’Av. . . .

ברכת המזון לסעודת טו באב | Birkat Hamazon additions for the Feast of Tu b’Av, by Gabriel Wasserman

Supplemental prayers for the Birkat Hamazon on Tu b’Av by Gabriel Wasserman . . .

סֵדֶר ט״וּ בִּשְׁבָט | A Tu BiShvat Seder to Heal the Wounded Earth, by Rabbi Arthur Waskow (The Shalom Center)

This Tu BiShvat haggadah focuses on healing the wounded Earth today, with passages on major policy questions facing the human race in the midst of a great climate crisis and massive extinctions of species. In each of the Four Worlds in this Haggadah (Earth, Water, Air, Fire) there are traditional, mystical, and poetical passages, and in each there are also contemporary passages on aspects of public policy (Earth: food and forest; Water: fracking; Air: climate; Fire: alternative and renewable energy sources.) These policy-oriented passages help make this a distinctive Haggadah. After these passages, this Haggadah encourages Seder participants to take time for discussion. They may also decide to omit some passages and/or add others. The desire for such a Haggadah grew from discussions of the Green Hevra, a network of Jewish environmental organizations. Thanks to Judith Belasco, Rabbi Mordechai Liebling, Sybil Sanchez, Rabbi David Seidenberg, Richard Schwartz, Rabbi David Shneyer, and Yoni Stadlin for comments on an earlier draft of this Haggadah. . . .

ברכת המזון | By the Sweat of their Brow, a Humanist Birkon by Dr. Tzemaḥ Yoreh

Many of our best times are spent eating. Jewish liturgy, however, is very stingy on blessings before eating (focusing much of its energy on blessings after eating). The blessings before food are generic, and except for very specific foods and drinks (such as wine, bread, and matzah), all foods lump into three or four categories (fruit, vegetables, grains, and everything else). As a foodie, I’d like to celebrate each and every distinct taste through the prism of Jewish experience, and thus have tried to compose as many short poems as possible in their honor. . . .

Meditation on the Akeidah in the Birkot haShaḥar, by Shim’on Menachem

I had an opening, with the help and support of some holy chevrei, to take on Binding of Isaac and accompanying meditations that occupy a conspicuous space during the morning blessings. This is what came out. . . .

Siddur on the Hill for Friday Night, by Ḥavurah on the Hill at the Vilna Shul, Boston (trans. Rabbi Sam Seicol, 2010)

We are grateful to the Vilna Shul in Boston and their Ḥavurah on the Hill program for preparing “Siddur on the Hill,” (2011) a beautiful siddur for Shabbat Friday night services and sharing it with free-culture compatible, open content licensing. The siddur includes original translations in English from Rabbi Sam Seicol, interpretive writings by Rabbi Rami Shapiro, and illustrations by Georgi Vogel Rosen, as well as contributions from numerous others. Thank you for sharing your siddur, open source! . . .

סדר לפסח: הארבה כוסות ואת הארבה חופשות | The Four Cups of Wine and the Four Freedoms, by Aurora Mendelsohn

Traditionally each cup in the Passover Seder is liked to a promise made by God in these verses, Exodus 6:6-7. The four cups can also be associated with the Four Freedoms first articulated by US President Franklin D. Roosevelt on January 6, 1941, which were an inspiration for the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and were explicitly incorporated into its preamble. . . .

הגדה שיר געולה | Haggadah Shir Ge’ulah (Song of Liberation) for Passover, by Rabbi Emily Aviva Kapor-Mater

Haggadah Shir Ge’ulah, the Song of Liberation, is a new Haggadah for Passover. It is at once traditional and radical, featuring egalitarian Hebrew and English, full transliteration, progressive theology, and a focus on modern issues of oppression and liberation. It is my hope that this Haggadah will elicit questions from all participants, and that everyone will find something in it to challenge them: both people steeped in Jewish learning and used to traditional texts, and also people who are new to the Passover seder or are coming from different worldviews and ideologies. . . .

הגדה לסדר פסח | The Freedom Seder Passover Haggadah for the Earth by The Shalom Center and Rabbi Arthur Waskow

Forty years after the first Freedom Seder, new Pharaohs have arisen. The institutional Pharaohs of our day are pressing down not just one people, one community, or another, but all the peoples on our planet and the web of life itself. In this Freedom Seder, we address Dr. Martin Luther King’s warning about “the giant triplets of racism, extreme materialism, and militarism,” which have threatened the very earth that sustains us all. For the Passover story reminds us: not only do new Pharaohs arise in every generation; so also do new grass-roots movement to free ourselves from these new pharaohs. Forty years after the first Freedom Seder, America today stands also on the brink of hope, “mixing memory with desire, stirring dull roots with spring rain.” . . .

Prayer for the Abducted Nigerian Schoolgirls, by Rabbi Hillel Lavery-Yisraëli (2014)

God of all people’s souls: Hasten, we pray, to rescue the hundreds of Nigerian young girls, innocent students who, in horrific cruelty, were abducted from their houses and schools by inhumane criminals intending to sell them into slavery and torture them. . . .

סדר לקריאת מגילת העצמאות | Reading of the Israeli Declaration of Independence for Yom Ha’atsma’ut

Jews have read sacred texts to commemorate miracles of redemption for a long time. Purim has Megilat Esther. Many communities read Megilat Antiochus or Megilat Yehudit for Chanukah. But to many modern Jews, the most miraculous redemption in recent history was the founding of the state of Israel, as we commemorate on Yom haAtzmaut. Like Purim, the story of the founding of Israel was entirely secular on a surface level, with no big showy miracles like a sea splitting or a mountain aflame. Like Chanukah, a Jewish state in the land of Israel won its independence against mighty forces allied in opposition. But we don’t have a megillah to read for Yom haAtzmaut. Or do we? Just as Megillat Esther is said to be a letter written by Mordekhai to raise awareness of the events of Shushan, so too does the Israeli Scroll of Independence, Megilat haAtzmaut, raise awareness of the events of the founding of the State of Israel. In this vein, I decided to create a cantillation system for Megilat haAtzmaut. Ta’amei miqra were chosen attempting to follow Masoretic grammatical rules – since modern Hebrew has a different grammatical structure, the form is somewhat loose. Because of the thematic similarities to Purim, I chose Esther cantillation for the majority of the text. Just as some tragic lines in Esther are read in Eikhah cantillation, some lines regarding the Shoah or bearing grim portents for the wars to follow are to be sung in Eikhah cantillation. And the final phrases of chapters II and III are to be sung in the melody for the end of a book of the Chumash, or the Song of the Sea melody. They can be done in a call-and-response form, with the community reading and the reader repeating. . . .

תהלים קמ״ב | Psalms 142 and Mi sheBerakh for those in captivity or whose whereabouts are unknown

May the one who blessed our ancestors, Avraham, Yitzḥak, and Yaakov, Yoseph, Moshe, and Aharon, David and Shlomo, Ruth, Sarah, Rivka, Miriam, Devorah, Tamar, and Raḥel, bless and safeguard and preserve the captives… . . .


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