Torah Reading for Parashat Vayishlaḥ (Genesis 32:4-36:43): Chantable English translation with trope, by Len Fellman

A Torah reading of Parashat Vayishlaḥ in English translation, transtropilized. . . .

Torah Reading for Parashat Vayetsei (Genesis 28:10-32:3): Chantable English translation with trope, by Len Fellman

A Torah reading of Parashat Vayetsei in English translation, transtropilized. . . .

Torah Reading for Parashat Toldōt (Genesis 25:19-28:9): Chantable English translation with trope, by Len Fellman

A Torah reading of Parashat Toldot in English translation, transtropilized. . . .

A Partial Torah Reading for Parashat Ḥayyei Sarah (Genesis 23-24 & Genesis 25:7-11): Chantable English translation with trope, by Len Fellman

A partial Torah reading of Parashat Ḥayyei Sarah in English translation, transtropilized. . . .

A Partial Torah Reading for Parashat Vayera (Genesis 19:1-23): Chantable English translation with trope, by Len Fellman

A partial Torah reading of Parashat Vayera in English translation, transtropilized. . . .

A Partial Torah Reading for Parashat Lekh Lekha (Genesis 12:1-9 & Genesis 16-17): Chantable English translation with trope, by Len Fellman

A partial Torah reading of Parashat Lekh Lekha in English translation, transtropilized. . . .

Haftarah Reading for Parashat Vayera (II Kings 4:1-37): Chantable English translation with trope, by Len Fellman

The hafatarah reading for Parashat Vayera in English translation, transtropilized. . . .

Haftarah Reading for Parashat Lekh Lekha (Isaiah 40:27-41:16): Chantable English translation with trope, by Len Fellman

The hafatarah reading for Parashat Lekh Lekha in English translation, transtropilized. . . .

A Partial Torah Reading for Parashat Noaḥ (Genesis 8:20-9:3 & Genesis 11): Chantable English translation with trope, by Len Fellman

A partial Torah reading of Parashat Noaḥ in English translation, transtropilized. . . .

Haftarah Reading for Parashat Noaḥ (Isaiah 54:1-55:5): Chantable English translation with trope, by Len Fellman

The hafatarah reading for Parashat Noaḥ in English Translation, transtropilized. . . .

A Partial Torah Reading for Parashat Bereshit (Genesis 1:1-3:24): Chantable English translation with trope, by Len Fellman

A partial Torah reading of Parashat Bereshit in English translation, transtropilized. . . .

Haftarah Reading for Parashat Bereshit (Isaiah 42:5-43:10): Chantable English translation with trope, by Len Fellman

The hafatarah reading for Parashat Bereishit in English Translation, transtropilized. . . .

Torah Reading for Simḥat Torah Morning (Genesis 1:1-2:3): Chantable English translation with trope, by Len Fellman

This is an English translation of the Torah reading for Simḥat Torah Morning (Genesis 1:1-2:3), transtropilized. . . .

Torah Reading for Ḥol HaMo’ed Sukkot (Exodus 33:12-34:26): Chantable English translation with trope, by Len Fellman

This is an English translation of the Torah reading for Ḥol HaMo’ed Sukkot (Exodus 33:12-34:26), transtropilized (a term coined by Fellman to describe texts where the Masoretic cantillation has been applied to the translation). This translation is based on the translations by H.L.Ginsberg, Stone Ed. Tanach, Jerusalem Bible, New King James Bible, and the JPS Tanach (both 1917 & 1999). . . .

מגילת קהלת | Megillat Qohelet (Ecclesiastes): Chantable English translation with trope, by Len Fellman

This is an English translation of Megillat Qohelet, (Kohelet/Ecclesiastes), transtropilized (a term coined by Fellman to describe texts where the Masoretic cantillation has been applied to the translation). This translation is based on the translations by H.L.Ginsberg, Stone Ed. Tanach, Jerusalem Bible, New King James Bible, and the JPS Tanach (both 1917 & 1999). This English translations is sung to the tropes by Len Fellman according to the melodies of Portnoy & Wolff. . . .

תהלים כז | Psalms 27, translated by Isaac Gantwerk Mayer

A translation of Psalm 27 for the season of repentance, by Isaac Gantwerk Mayer. . . .

Torah Reading for Yom Kippur morning (Leviticus 16:1-34): Chantable English translation with trope, by Len Fellman

Transtropilation of an English translation for the morning Torah reading on Yom Kippur (Leviticus 16:1-34), by Len Fellman. . . .

Haftarah Reading for Yom Kippur morning (Isaiah 57:14-58:14): Chantable English translation with trope, by Len Fellman

This is an English translation of the Haftarah reading for Yom Kippur (Isaiah 57:14-58:14), transtropilized (a term coined by Fellman to describe texts where the Masoretic cantillation has been applied to the translation). . . .

הברכה יוצר אור | Yotser Ohr, translated by Rabbi Zalman Schachter-Shalomi

Rabbi Zalman Schachter-Shalomi, z”l, included his translation of the shaḥarit blessing before the Shema “Yotser Ohr” in his Siddur Tehillat Hashem Yidaber Pi (2009). . . .

הברכה אהבת עולם | Ahavat Olam, translated by Rabbi Zalman Schachter-Shalomi

Rabbi Zalman Schachter-Shalomi, z”l, included his translation of “Ahavat Olam” in his Siddur Tehillat Hashem Yidaber Pi (2009). . . .

Haftarah Readings for the first day (1 Samuel 1:1-2:10) and second day (Jeremiah 31:1-19) of Rosh Hashanah: Chantable English translation with trope, by Len Fellman

This is an English translation of the Haftarah readings for Rosh Hashanah, transtropilized (a term coined by Fellman to describe texts where the Masoretic cantillation has been applied to the translation). . . .

Torah Readings for the first and second days of Rosh Hashanah (Genesis ch. 21 and 22): Chantable English translation with trope, by Len Fellman

Transtropilation of an English translation for the first and second days of Rosh Hashanah, by Len Fellman. . . .

מגילת אנטיוכס עם טעמי מקרא | Megillat Antiokhus, with ta’amei miqra (for cantillation) by Isaac Gantwerk Mayer

Perhaps Megillat Antiokhus could be read a la Esther on Purim (the holiday with the most similarities), going to Eicha trope in the upsetting parts. A few notes: on the final mention of Bagris the Wicked I included a karnei-farah in the manner of the karnei-farah in Esther. I also included a merkha kefulah in the concluding section, which (according to David Weisberg’s “The Rare Accents of the Twenty-Eight Books”) represents aggadic midrash material. It also serves as a connection to the Chanukah haftarah, which is famously the only one that has a merkha kefulah. –Isaac Mayer . . .

מגילת איכה | Megillat Eikhah: Chantable English translation with trope, by Len Fellman

A “transtropilation” of an English translation of Lamentations (Eikhah) by Len Fellman. . . .

Méditation Pour Le Jeudi | Meditation for Thursday (the Fifth Day), by R’ Arnaud Aron and Jonas Ennery (1848), translated to English by Isaac Leeser (1863)

To the best of my ability, this is a faithful transcription of a teḥinah (supplicatory prayer) composed in parallel to the Prayer for Thursday, following in the paraliturgical tradition of Yiddish tkhines, albeit written in French. . . .

ראש חדש | Au Renouvellememt Du Mois | At the New Moon, by Arnaud Aron and Jonas Ennery (1848), translated to English by Isaac Leeser (1863)

To the best of my ability, this is a faithful transcription of a teḥinah (supplicatory prayer) composed in parallel to the Prayer for the New Moon, following in the paraliturgical tradition of Yiddish tkhines, albeit written in French. . . .

יהי כבוד | Yehi Kh’vod, interpretive translation by Reb Zalman Schachter-Shalomi, z”l

Rabbi Zalman Schachter-Shalomi, z”l, included his translation of “Yehi Kh’vod” in his Siddur Tehillat Hashem Yidaber Pi (2009). To the best of my ability, I have set his translation side-by-side with the verses comprising the piyyut. . . .

אנא בכח | Ana b’Koaḥ, attributed to Rebbi Neḥunyah ben haQanah (singing translation by Reb Zalman z”l)

To Rebbi Neḥunyah ben haQanah is generally attributed the composition of אנא בכח, the initials of which form a forty-two-lettered divine name. He is considered to have been a chief transmitter of an esoteric Jewish lineage in antiquity, the Yordei Merqavah (Descenders to the Chariot). The author of the Bahir and of the Sefer ha-Peli’ah has also beenn attributed to him. . . .

נשמה שנתת בי | Neshamah Shenatata Bi (the breath you have given me), interpretive translation by Reb Zalman Schachter-Shalomi, z”l

This English translation by Rabbi Zalman Schachter-Shalomi z”l of “Neshama Shenatata Bi,” was first published in his Siddur Tehillat Hashem Yidaber Pi (2009). Linear associations of this translation according to the nusaḥ ha-ARI z”l by Aharon Varady. . . .

ברכות התורה | Blessing for Torah Study, interpretive translation by Reb Zalman Schachter-Shalomi, z”l

This English translation of the blessing for Torah study by Rabbi Zalman Schachter-Shalomi z”l, was first published in his Siddur Tehillat Hashem Yidaber Pi (2009). Versification according to the Nusaḥ ha-ARI z”l by Aharon Varady. . . .

אשר יצר | Asher Yatsar, interpretive translation by Reb Zalman Schachter-Shalomi z”l

This English translation of the prayer “Asher Yatsar” by Rabbi Zalman Schachter-Shalomi z”l, was first published in his Siddur Tehillat Hashem Yidaber Pi (2009). Versification by Aharon Varady according to the nusaḥ ha-ARI z”l. . . .

תהלים כ״ז | Psalms 27 (interpretive translation by Reb Zalman Schachter-Shalomi, z”l)

This English translation of Psalms 27 by Rabbi Zalman Schachter-Shalomi z”l, was first published in his Siddur Tehillat Hashem Yidaber Pi (2009). Versification by Aharon Varady. . . .

רבון העולמים | Ribon HaOlamim from the Seder Tefilot of the RaMBaM in M.S. Constantinople 1509 (trans. Aharon Varady)

Source (Hebrew) Translation (English) לְעוֹלָם יְהֵא אָדָם יְרֵא שָׁמַֽיִם בַּסֵּתֶר וּמוֹדֶה עַל הָאֱמֶת, וְדוֹבֵר אֱמֶת בִּלְבָבוֹ, וְיַשְׁכֵּם וְיאֹמַר: Always may a person revere Heaven in solitude,[1]lit. seclusion jQuery(“#footnote_plugin_tooltip_1”).tooltip({ tip: “#footnote_plugin_tooltip_text_1”, tipClass: “footnote_tooltip”, effect: “fade”, fadeOutSpeed: 100, predelay: 400, position: “center right”, relative: true, offset: [0, 0] }); to contemplate Truth and articulate truth in . . .

תהלים ק׳ | Psalms 100, interpretive translation and adaptation by Reb Zalman Schachter-Shalomi z”l

This interpretation and adaptation of Psalms 100 by Rabbi Zalman Schachter-Shalomi z”l, was first published in his Siddur Tehillat Hashem Yidaber Pi (2009). . . .

תהלים ס״ז | Psalms 67 (interpretive translation by Reb Zalman Schachter-Shalomi, z”l)

This English translation of Psalms 30 by Rabbi Zalman Schachter-Shalomi z”l, was first published in his Siddur Tehillat Hashem Yidaber Pi (2009). Versification by Aharon Varady. . . .

אשרי | Ashrei (Psalms 145), in an adapted translation by Rabbi Sam Seicol

A modern translation of the Ashrei in alphabetic parallel to the Hebrew. . . .

A Supplication Before the Divine Throne During an Outbreak of Asiatic Cholera in Montreal by R’ Abraham de Sola (1849)

This is a faithful transcription of a prayer appearing at the end of a sermon delivered by Rabbi Abraham de Sola in K.K. Shearith Yisrael (Montreal), “during the prevalence of asiatic cholera,” and subsequently published in the Occident and American Jewish Advocate (7:7, Tishrei 5610/October 1849). The English translation is a “free translation” made by Rabbi Abraham de Sola. . . .

Méditation Pour le Mercedi by R’ Arnaud Aron and Jonas Ennery (1848), translated to English by Isaac Leeser (1863)

To the best of my ability, this is a faithful transcription of a teḥinah (supplicatory prayer) composed in parallel to the Shir Shel Yom (Psalm of the Day) for Wednesday, following in the paraliturgical tradition of Yiddish tkhines, albeit written in French. (This particular paraliturgical prayer may be original or it may be based on an earlier work in German or Yiddish. Please contact us or comment below if you can identify it.) The prayer was included by Rabbi Arnaud Aron and Jonas Ennery in their opus, אמרי לב Prières d’un Coeur Israelite published in 1848 by the Société Consistoriale de Bons Livres. In 1855, an abridged English translation of Prières d’un Coeur Israelite was authorized by Nathan Marcus Adler, chief rabbi of the British Empire and published as Prayers and Meditations, translated by Hester Rothschild. In 1863, Isaac Leeser published his own translation. This is the first time that Leeser’s translation and its source have been set next to each other. . . .

Méditation Pour le Mardi by R’ Arnaud Aron and Jonas Ennery (1848), translated to English by Isaac Leeser (1863)

To the best of my ability, this is a faithful transcription of a teḥinah (supplicatory prayer) composed in parallel to the Shir Shel Yom (Psalm of the Day) for Tuesday, following in the paraliturgical tradition of Yiddish tkhines, albeit written in French. (This particular paraliturgical prayer may be original or it may be based on an earlier work in German or Yiddish. Please contact us or comment below if you can identify it.) The prayer was included by Rabbi Arnaud Aron and Jonas Ennery in their opus, אמרי לב Prières d’un Coeur Israelite published in 1848 by the Société Consistoriale de Bons Livres. In 1855, an abridged English translation of Prières d’un Coeur Israelite was authorized by Nathan Marcus Adler, chief rabbi of the British Empire and published as Prayers and Meditations, translated by Hester Rothschild. In 1863, Isaac Leeser published his own translation. This is the first time that Leeser’s translation and its source have been set next to each other. . . .

[Gebet] Am Donnerstag by Fanny Schmiedl Neuda (1855)

This is the prayer for Thursday, a paraliturgical teḥinah opposite the Shir shel Yom (Psalm of the Day) for Thursday, included by Fanny Schmiedl Neuda in her collection of teḥinot in vernacular German. Fanny Neuda likely either composed or translated this teḥinah into German (from Yiddish) while performing in the capacity of firzogerin (precentress) of the weibershul (women’s gallery) in her husband’s synagogue in Loštice, Bohemia. . . .

[Gebet] Am Mittwoch by Fanny Schmiedl Neuda (1855)

This is the prayer for Wednesday, a paraliturgical teḥinah opposite the Shir shel Yom (Psalm of the Day) for Wednesday, included by Fanny Schmiedl Neuda in her collection of teḥinot in vernacular German. Fanny Neuda likely either composed or translated this teḥinah into German (from Yiddish) while performing in the capacity of firzogerin (precentress) of the weibershul (women’s gallery) in her husband’s synagogue in Loštice, Bohemia. . . .

[Gebet] Am Dienstag by Fanny Schmiedl Neuda (1855)

This is the prayer for Tuesday, a paraliturgical teḥinah opposite the Shir shel Yom (Psalm of the Day) for Tuesday, included by Fanny Schmiedl Neuda in her collection of teḥinot in vernacular German. Fanny Neuda likely either composed or translated this teḥinah into German (from Yiddish) while performing in the capacity of firzogerin (precentress) of the weibershul (women’s gallery) in her husband’s synagogue in Loštice, Bohemia. . . .

תהלים פ״ב | The Psalm for Tuesday, Psalms 82 (translation by Reb Zalman Schachter-Shalomi, z”l)

Rabbi Zalman Schachter-Shalomi, z”l, included his translation of the Psalm of the Day for Monday (Psalms 82) in his Siddur Tehillat Hashem Yidaber Pi (2009). To the best of my ability, I have set his translation side-by-side with a transcription of the vocalized text of the Psalm. –Aharon N. Varady . . .

תהלים מ״ח | The Psalm for Monday, Psalms 48 (translation by Reb Zalman Schachter-Shalomi, z”l)

Rabbi Zalman Schachter-Shalomi, z”l, included his translation of the Psalm of the Day for Monday (Psalms 48) in his Siddur Tehillat Hashem Yidaber Pi (2009). To the best of my ability, I have set his translation side-by-side with a transcription of the vocalized text of the Psalm. –Aharon N. Varady . . .

[Gebet] Am Montag by Fanny Schmiedl Neuda (1855)

This is the prayer for Monday, a paraliturgical teḥinah opposite the Shir shel Yom (Psalm of the Day) for Sunday, included by Fanny Schmiedl Neuda in her collection of teḥinot in vernacular German. Fanny Neuda likely either composed or translated this teḥinah into German while performing in the capacity of firzogerin (precentress) of the weibershul (women’s gallery) in her husband’s synagogue in Loštice, Bohemia. . . .

Méditation Pour le Lundi by R’ Arnaud Aron and Jonas Ennery (1848), translated to English by Isaac Leeser (1863)

This is a faithful transcription of a teḥinah (supplicatory prayer) composed in parallel to the prayer for Monday, following in the paraliturgical tradition of Yiddish tkhines, albeit written in French. (This particular paraliturgical prayer may be original or it may be based on an earlier work in German or Yiddish. Please contact us or comment below if you can identify it.) The prayer was included by Rabbi Arnaud Aron and Jonas Ennery in their opus, אמרי לב Prières d’un Coeur Israelite published in 1848 by the Société Consistoriale de Bons Livres. In 1855, an abridged English translation of Prières d’un Coeur Israelite was authorized by Nathan Marcus Adler, chief rabbi of the British Empire and published as Prayers and Meditations, translated by Hester Rothschild. In 1863, Isaac Leeser published his own translation. This is the first time that Leeser’s translation and its source have been set next to each other. . . .

Méditation Pour le Dimanche by R’ Arnaud Aron and Jonas Ennery (1848), translated to English by Isaac Leeser (1863)

This is a faithful transcription of a teḥinah (supplicatory prayer) composed in parallel to the prayer for Sunday, following in the paraliturgical tradition of Yiddish tkhines, albeit written in French. (This particular paraliturgical prayer may be original or it may be based on an earlier work in German or Yiddish. Please contact us or comment below if you can identify it.) The prayer was included by Rabbi Arnaud Aron and Jonas Ennery in their opus, אמרי לב Prières d’un Coeur Israelite published in 1848 by the Société Consistoriale de Bons Livres. In 1855, an abridged English translation of Prières d’un Coeur Israelite was authorized by Nathan Marcus Adler, chief rabbi of the British Empire and published as Prayers and Meditations, translated by Hester Rothschild. In 1863, Isaac Leeser published his own translation. This is the first time that Leeser’s translation and its source have been set next to each other. Commenting on Rothschild’s translation, Leeser wrote: . . .

Méditation Pour le Lundi by R’ Arnaud Aron and Jonas Ennery (1848), translated to English by Hester Rothschild (1855)

This is a faithful transcription of a teḥinah (supplicatory prayer) composed in parallel to the prayer for Monday, following in the paraliturgical tradition of Yiddish tkhines, albeit written in French. (This particular paraliturgical prayer may be original or it may be based on an earlier work in German or Yiddish. Please contact us or comment below if you can identify it.) The prayer was included by Rabbi Arnaud Aron and Jonas Ennery in their opus, אמרי לב Prières d’un Coeur Israelite published in 1848 by the Société Consistoriale de Bons Livres. In 1855, an abridged English translation of Prières d’un Coeur Israelite was authorized by Nathan Marcus Adler, chief rabbi of the British Empire and published as Prayers and Mediatations, translated by Hester Rothschild. This is the first time the translation and its source have been set next to each other. This transcription was made possible with the help of French Wikisource contributors. If you can read French, you can help to complete our transcription by proofreading it on Wikisource. . . .

Méditation Pour le Dimanche by R’ Arnaud Aron and Jonas Ennery (1848), translated to English by Hester Rothschild (1855)

This is a faithful transcription of a teḥinah (supplicatory prayer) composed in parallel to the prayer for Sunday, following in the paraliturgical tradition of Yiddish tkhines, albeit written in French. (This particular paraliturgical prayer may be original or it may be based on an earlier work in German or Yiddish. Please contact us or comment below if you can identify it.) The prayer was included by Rabbi Arnaud Aron and Jonas Ennery in their opus, אמרי לב Prières d’un Coeur Israelite published in 1848 by the Société Consistoriale de Bons Livres. In 1855, an abridged English translation of Prières d’un Coeur Israelite was authorized by Nathan Marcus Adler, chief rabbi of the British Empire and published as Prayers and Mediatations, translated by Hester Rothschild. This is the first time the translation and its source have been set next to each other. This transcription was made possible with the help of French Wikisource contributors. If you can read French, you can help to complete our transcription by proofreading it on Wikisource. . . .

[Gebet] Am Sonntag by Fanny Schmiedl Neuda (1855)

This is the prayer for Sunday, a paraliturgical teḥinah opposite the Shir shel Yom (Psalm of the Day) for Sunday, included by Fanny Schmiedl Neuda in her collection of teḥinot in vernacular German. Fanny Neuda likely either composed or translated this teḥinah into German while performing in the capacity of firzogerin (precentress) of the weibershul (women’s gallery) in her husband’s synagogue in Loštice, Bohemia. . . .


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