tagged: paraliturgical birkat hamazon

 

Bénissons, a French table song for the Birkat haMazon (ca. 18th c.)

Bénissons is the French version of the well-known Bendigamos, a prayer and melody of the Spanish & Portuguese Jewish communities, most probably originating in Bordeaux, France. . . .

יוֹם זֶה לְיִשְׁרַאֵל | Yom Zeh l’Yisrael, a piyyut by Rabbi Yitsḥaq Luria (abridged rhymed translation by Alice Lucas, 1898)

An abridged rhymed translation of the piyyut Yom Zeh l’Yisrael. . . .

צוּר מִשֶּׁלּוֹ אָכַֽלְנוּ | Tsur Mishelo Akhalnu, a paraliturgical Birkat haMazon (rhymed translation by Alice Lucas, 1898)

A rhymed translation of Tsur Mishelo, a paralitugical Birkat haMazon. . . .

Prière de table d’un enfant | A Child’s Table Prayer, by Jonas Ennery & Rabbi Arnaud Aron (1852)

A birkat hamazon for children. . . .

Ya Komimos (We have eaten), a Ladino piyyut for the Birkat haMazon

A paraliturgical birkat hamazon in Ladino. . . .

Bendigamos al Altísimo, a Spanish song for the Birkat haMazon

Bendigamos is a hymn sung after meals according to the custom of Spanish and Portuguese Jews. It has also been traditionally sung by the Jews of Turkish descent. It is similar in meaning to the Birkat Hamazon that is said by all Jews. Bendigamos is said in addition to Birkat Hamazon, either immediately before or immediately after it. The text is in modern Spanish, not Ladino. The prayer was translated by David de Sola Pool. Below is the actual text as well as the translation by de Sola Pool. The melody is one of the best known and loved Spanish and Portuguese melodies, used also for the Song of the Sea (in the Shabbat morning service) and sometimes in “Hallel” (on the first day of the Hebrew month and on festivals). . . .

צוּר מִשֶּׁלּוֹ אָכַֽלְנוּ | Tsur Mishelo Akhalnu, a paraliturgical Birkat haMazon (translation by Sara-Kinneret Lapidot)

The piyyut, Tsur Mishelo, in Hebrew with an English translation. . . .

Étkezés utáni ima | Gebet nach dem Speisen | Prayer after the meal, a paraliturgical Birkat haMazon by Rabbi Arnold Kiss (1897)

This paraliturgical Birkat haMazon by Rabbi Arnold Kiss, “Étkezés utáni ima” (Magyar, 1897) and “Gebet nach dem Speisen” (German, 1907), was first published in his anthology of prayers for Jewish women, Mirjam on p.200-202 of the original Magyar edition and p.354-357 of the subsequent German edition. I’ve set separate English translations side-by-side with the Magyar and German in order to highlight the subtle differences between the two. –Aharon Varady . . .