tagged: Parents blessing children

 

ברכה לילדים | Blessing for Children [at the Onset of the School Year] (Siddur Tefilat ha-Adam, Israeli Reform Movement 2020)

A prayer for children at the onset of the school year. . . .

Bénédiction des parents sur leurs enfants — Imposition des mains | Parents’ blessing on their children. — Laying of hands (on a Bar/Bat Mitsvah), by Jonas Ennery & Rabbi Arnaud Aron (1852)

A blessing given by the parents of a Bar or Bat Mitsvah after they are confirmed in a public ceremony. . . .

Prayer of Parents for Son or Daughter in the Armed Forces, by Rabbi Max Klein (1951)

A prayer offered for parents praying for the safety and welfare of their adult children entering the armed forces. . . .

ברוכה הבאה | Blessed be the newcomer!, a ceremony for the naming of a baby daughter by Joshua Gutoff (ca. 1989)

A ceremony for the naming of a baby daughter. . . .

שמחת בת | Simḥat Bat of Amalya Shaḥar Exler-Kaunfer, by Rabbi Elie Kaunfer and Lisa Exler

In place of the blood of the slaughtered bulls from the covenantal ceremony in Exodus, we looked for another substance to effect the covenant ceremony. Amalya was born right after Shavuot, on which we have a tradition to eat dairy. In fact, milk itself is associated with the acceptance of Torah, as described in the following Midrash which quotes a verse from Song of Songs (4:11): “Sweetness drops from your lips, O bride; honey and milk are under your tongue and the scent of your robes is like the scent of Lebanon.” . . .

ברכת הורים לבר או בת מצווה | Parents’ blessing for a Bar or Bat Mitsvah by Rabbi Dr. Aryeh Cohen

I wrote this brachah on the occasion of my son Oryah’s bar mitzvah. The Aramaic/Hebrew and the translation are mine. My partner and I recited the blessing after my son was called up to the Torah. The brachah replaces the ברוך שפטרנו which is recited in some communities. This blessing (which is basically self-explanatory) expresses gratitude for Divine favor leading to this moment and a prayer for Heavenly guidance for my son’s continued path. Though the translation is gender neutral in relation to God, the Hebrew/Aramaic is gendered masculine. This is my practice with regards to my children. I bless my daughter with feminine God language and my son with masculine God language. The blessing can be grammatically adapted for a bat mitzvah. . . .

מי שברך לילדים והוריהם בשלהי שנה ובפתיחה | Mi sheBeraj para los niños y sus padres en el inicio de un nuevo año escolar | Mi sheBerakh for Children and their Parents at the Commencement of the School Year, by Rabbi Hagit Sabag Yisrael (Masorti Movement in Israel)

A “mi sheberakh” blessing for children and the parents of children returning to school at the beginning of the new school year. . . .


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