Three stanzas adapted from “Worship,” a poem by John Greenleaf Whittier (1848)

A hymn for peace and the end of war. . . .

May Wars Cease, a hymn by Rabbi Max Klein (1926)

A hymn for the end of war by Rabbi Max D. Klein. . . .

סדר עבודה מחזור לימים נוראים (אשכנז)‏ | Seder Avodah Maḥzor l’Yamim Nora’im, arranged and translated by Rabbi Max D. Klein (1960)

A maḥzor for Rosh haShanah and Yom Kippur, prepared for a mid-20th century Conservative Jewish congregation in Philadelphia. . . .

סדר עבודה תפלות לשבת לשלוש רגלים ולחול (אשכנז)‏ | Seder Avodah Tefilot l’Shabbat, l’Shalosh Regalim, u’l’Ḥol, arranged and translated by Rabbi Max Klein (1951)

A bilingual Hebrew-English prayerbook for Shabbat, Festivals, and Weekdays, prepared in 1951 by Rabbi Max D. Klein for his congregation Adath Jeshurun, a Conservative synagogue in Philadelphia. . . .

Hymns of Praise and Prayer, compiled by Rabbi Max D. Klein for Congregation Adath Jeshurun, Philadelphia (1926)

A hymnal prepared in 1926 by Rabbi Max D. Klein for his congregation, Adath Jeshurun in Philadelphia. . . .

סדר עבודה ערבית לשבת ולשלוש רגלים (אשכנז)‏ | Seder Avodah Tefilat Arvit l’Shabbat u’l’Shalosh Regalim, arranged, translated, and transliterated by Rabbi Max D. Klein (1954)

A Friday and pilgrimage festival night siddur, translated with a unique transliteration schema devised by Rabbi Max D. (Meir David) Klein of Congregation Adath Jeshurun in Philadelphia, 1954. . . .

Songs and Prayers and Meditations for Divine Services of Israelites, arranged by Rabbi Benjamin Szold and translated by Rabbi Marcus Jastrow (1873)

A hymnal prepared by Rabbi Benjamin Szold and translated from German into English by Rabbi Marcus Jastrow. . . .

תפילה למצביעי המדינה | Prayer for the Electorate, by David Zvi Kalman (2016)

A prayer for the electorate to be recited together with the Prayer for Government on the Shabbat before an election (federal, state, or local). David Zvi Kalman’s “Prayer for the Electorate” was initially published on Ritualwell here and linked from an explanation of the prayer posted here. Vocalization of the unpointed text by Josh Soref. (Thank you!) . . .

סדר תפלות כל השנה (אשכנז)‏ | Magil’s Complete (Hebrew-English) Linear Prayer Book, arranged and translated by Yosef Mogilnitski (second improved edition, 1908)

A bilingual Hebrew-English siddur, with translation presented in a linear, phrase by phrase format, to aid English readers in learning liturgical Hebrew. . . .

אָנָּא בְּכֹחַ | Ana b’Khoaḥ, with a singing translation in English by Reb Zalman z”l

The most well-known 42 letter divine name acrostic piyyut. . . .

ברכות על קריאת התורה | Blessing over the Torah Reading, at Mishkan Shalom, Philadelphia

Rabbi Zalman Schachter-Shalomi, Reb Arthur Waskow, and others helped to formulate this grammatically feminine Hebrew blessing for an oleh in their blessing over the Torah reading, in the early years of Congregation Mishkan Shalom in Philadelphia (1988-1983). . . .

The Megillah of Esther: An Original English Rendition Set to Trōp, by Ḥazzan Jack Kessler

The Megillah of Esther: An Original English Rendition (set to trop) by Ḥazzan Jack Kessler was first published in 1990. This second “version 2.0” edition was published in 2016. . . .

הגדה לסדר פסח | MLK +50 Labor-Justice Interfaith Freedom Seder, by R’ Arthur Waskow and The Shalom Center

The MLK+50 Interfaith Freedom Seder woven by the Shalom Center to reawaken and renew the prophetic wisdom of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. during holy week and Passover in the 50th year since his death. . . .

סידור עבודת ישראל | Siddur Aḅodath Yisrael, arranged by R’ Benjamin Szold and translated by R’ Marcus Jastrow (1873)

The siddur, Aḅodath Yisrael was first prepared for Temple Oheb Shalom (Baltimore, Maryland) by Rabbi Benjamin Szold (1829-1902). Before Szold’s arrival in 1859, the congregation had adopted for use in its Shabbat service the Minhag America by the Reform rabbi, Isaac Meyer Wise. After much discussion with his congregation Szold introduced Aḅodath Yisrael, which hewed more closely to traditional Ashkenazi custom. The first edition of this prayer-book appeared in 1863 with German translation, and was widely adopted by congregations in the United States. New editions were published in 1864 and 1865 (the latter with English translation), and another, revised edition in 1871, by Rabbis Marcus Jastrow of Philadelphia (1829-1903) and Henry Hochheimer of Baltimore (1818-1912). . . .

The Presence of an Absence: a Public Reading for the Fast of Esther, the dark side to Purim, by Rabbi Arthur O. Waskow

A public reading offered by Rabbi Arthur Waskow for the Fast of Esther in response to recent events in the State of Israel by the right-wing government of Bibi Netanyahu admitting Jewish fascists into their administration. . . .

והיה אם שמע | v’haya im shemo’a: a Prayer in a Time of Planetary Danger by Rabbi Arthur Waskow

A midrashic translation/ interpretation of the second paragraph of the Sh’ma. . . .

The personal prayer of this shaliaḥ tsibbur, by Yosef Goldman

“The personal prayer of this shaliaḥ tsibbur” with a translation of the piyyut “Oḥilah la’El” was first published on Facebook by Yosef Goldman and shared through the Open Siddur Project via its Facebook discussion group. . . .

שמע | Sh’ma: an Interpretation for the 21st Century by Rabbi Arthur Waskow (2003)

Sh’sh’sh’ma Yisra’el — Listen, You Godwrestlers! Pause from your wrestling and hush’sh’sh To hear — YHWH/ Yahh Hear in the stillness the still silent voice, The silent breathing that intertwines life; YHWH/ Yahh elohenu Breath of life is our God, What unites all the varied forces creating all worlds into one-ness, Each breath unique, And all unified; YHWH / Yahh echad! Yahh is One. Listen, You Godwrestlers! No one people alone owns this Unify-force; YHWH / Yahh is One. . . .

The Last Tisha b’Av: A Tale of New Temples, by Rabbi Arthur Ocean Waskow and Rabbi Phyllis Ocean Berman (2006)

Long ago there came a Ḥassid, visiting from Vitebsk to see his Rebbe. Struggling up hills, over cobblestones, through narrow alleyways, the Ḥassid came panting, shaking, to the door of a pale and quiet synagogue. So pale, so quiet was this shul that the pastel paintings on the wall and ceiling stood out as though they were in vivid primary colors. As the Ḥassid came into the shul, he saw his Rebbe high on a make-shift ladder, painting a picture on the ceiling above the bimah. . . .


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