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Sabbath Eve (In the Home), a prayer welcoming the Shabbat Queen by Rabbi Ely E. Pilchik (1962)

https://opensiddur.org/?p=46533 Sabbath Eve (In the Home), a prayer welcoming the Shabbat Queen by Rabbi Ely E. Pilchik (1962) 2022-09-04 07:26:39 "Sabbath Eve (In the Home)" by Rabbi Ely E. Pilchik was first published in Rabbi Morrison David Bial's anthology, <em><a href="https://opensiddur.org/?p=32508">An Offering of Prayer</a></em> (1962), p. 28, from where this prayer was transcribed. Text the Open Siddur Project Aharon N. Varady (transcription) Aharon N. Varady (transcription) Ely Emanuel Pilchik https://opensiddur.org/copyright-policy/ Aharon N. Varady (transcription) https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/ Erev Shabbat 20th century C.E. 58th century A.M. English vernacular prayer Sabbath Queen
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Our God and God of Our Fathers:
In devotional prayer and joyous song
we again welcome Thy messenger,
the Sabbath Queen,
as she arrives softly and imperceptibly
in the chariot of time.
How deeply grateful are Thy children
for the quickening message of the Sabbath.
Into our turbulent prosaic lives
she injects the poetry of rest and calm.
To our bruised spirit
the Sabbath brings a soothing balm.
Her penetrating light and warmth
melt the walls isolating our dark, cold selves,
reigniting the divine spark within us.
O Heavenly Father,
help us to realize the need of Thy Sabbath in our lives.
May we entertain our weekly visitor
in respect and devotion.
Attune our ears to Thy inspiration
transmitted through the message of Sabbath,
so that we may learn more of Thy will,
thus drawing ever closer to Thee.
Amen.

“Sabbath Eve (In the Home)” by Rabbi Ely E. Pilchik was first published in Rabbi Morrison David Bial’s anthology, An Offering of Prayer (1962), p. 28, from where this prayer was transcribed. As published there, Pilchik uses the pronoun “it” to refer to the Sabbath Queen, and I have replaced such instances in the prayer with feminine pronouns. –Aharon Varady

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