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שַׁבָּת הַמַּלְכָּה | The Shabbat Queen, by Ḥayyim Naḥman Bialik (1903)

https://opensiddur.org/?p=15093 שַׁבָּת הַמַּלְכָּה | The Shabbat Queen, by Ḥayyim Naḥman Bialik (1903) 2017-02-03 01:46:55 This translation of Ḥayyim Naḥman Bialik’s "Shabbat ha-Malkah" by Israel Meir Lask can be found on pages 280-281 in the <a href="https://archive.org/stream/SabbathPrayerBookJewishReconstructionistFoundation1945/Sabbath%20Prayer%20Book%20%28Jewish%20Reconstructionist%20Foundation%2C%201945%29#page/n312/mode/2up">Sabbath Prayer Book</a> (Jewish Reconstructionist Foundation, 1945) where it appears as “Greeting to Queen Sabbath.” The poem is based on the shabbat song, "Shalom Alekhem" and first published in the poetry collection, <em>Hazamir</em>, in 1903. I have made a faithful transcription of the Hebrew and its English translation as it appears in the <em>Sabbath Prayer Book</em>. The first stanza of Lask's translation was adapted from an earlier translation made by Angie Irma Cohon and published in 1920 in <em>Song and Praise for Sabbath Eve</em> (1920), p. 87. (Cohon's translation of Bialik's second stanza of "Shabbat ha-Malkah" does not appear to have been adapted by Lask.) Text the Open Siddur Project Aharon N. Varady (transcription) Aharon N. Varady (transcription) Israel Meir Lask (translation) Angie Irma Cohon Ḥayyim Naḥman Bialik https://opensiddur.org/copyright-policy/ Aharon N. Varady (transcription) https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/ Kabbalat Shabbat modern hebrew poetry 57th century A.M. Queens rhyming translation 20th century C.E. זמירות zemirot English Translation
Source (Hebrew) Translation by I.M. Lask (English) Translation by A.I. Cohon (English)
הַחַמָּה מֵרֹאשׁ הָאִילָנוֹת נִסְתַּלְּקָה.
בֹּֽאוּ וְנֵצֵא לִקְרַאת שַׁבָּת הַמַּלְכָּה.
הִנֵּה הִיא יוֹרֶֽדֶת הַקְדוֹשָׁה הַבְּרוּכָה.
וְעִמָּהּ מַלְאָכִים צְבָא שָׁלוֹם וּמְנוּחָה:
בֹּֽאִי בֹּֽאִי הַמַּלְכָּה.
בֹּֽאִי בֹּֽאִי הַכַּלָּה.
שָׁלוֹם עֲלֵיכֶם מַלְאֲכֵי הַשָּׁלוֹם:
The sun o’er the treetops no longer is seen;
Come, let us go forth and greet Sabbath the Queen.
Behold her descending, the holy and blest,
And with her the angels of peace and of rest.
Welcome, welcome, queen and bride,
Welcome, welcome, queen and bride.
Peace be unto you, angels of peace.
The sun on the tree-tops no longer is seen,
Come, gather to welcome the Sabbath, our Queen.
Behold her descending, the holy, the blest,
With angels—a cohort of peace and of rest.
Draw nigh, O Queen, and here abide;
Draw nigh, draw nigh, O Sabbath bride.
Peace also to you, Ye angels of peace!
קִבַּֽלְנוּ פְנֵי שַׁבָּת בִרְנָנָה וּתְפִלָּה.
הַבַּֽיְתָה נָשׁוּבָה בְּלֵב מָלֵא גִילָה.
שָׁם עָרוּךְ הַשֻּׁלְחָן הַנֵרוֹת יָאִֽירוּ.
כָּל־פִּנוֹת הַבַּֽיִת יִזְרָֽחוּ יַזְהִירוּ.
שַׁבַּת שָׁלוֹם וּבְרָכָה.
שַׁבַּת שָׁלוֹם וּמְנוּחָה.
בֹּאֲכֶם לְשָׁלוֹם מַלְאֲכֵי הַשָּׁלוֹם:
The Sabbath is greeted with song and with praise,
We go slowly homewards, our hearts full of grace.
The table is spread there, the candles give light,
Every nook in the house is shining and bright.
Sabbath is peace and rest.
Sabbath is peaceful and blest.
Enter in peace, ye angels of peace.
We’ve welcomed the Sabbath with song and with prayer;
And home we return, our heart’s gladness to share.
The table is set and the candles are lit,
The tiniest corner for Sabbath made fit.
O day of blessing, day of rest!
Sweet day of peace be ever blest!
Bring ye also peace, Ye angels of peace!
שְׁבִי זַכָּה עִמָּֽנוּ וּבְזִיוֵךְ נָא אֽוֹרִי
לַיְלָה וָיוֹם אַחַר תַּעֲבֹֽרִי.
וַאֲנַחְנוּ נְכַבְּדֵךְ בְּבִגְדֵי חֲמוּדוֹת.
בִּזְמִירוֹת וּתְפִלּוֹת וּבְשָׁלֹשׁ סְעֻדוֹת:
וּבִמְנוּחָה שְׁלֵמָה.
וּבִמְנוּחָה נָעֵֽמָה.
בָּרְכֽוּנוּ לְשָׁלוֹם מַלְאֲכֵי הַשָּׁלוֹם:
O pure one, be with us and light with thy ray
The night and the day; then pass on thy way.
And we do thee honor with garments most fine,
With songs and with prayer and with three feasts with wine,
And sweetness of peace,
And perfect peace.
Bless us with peace, ye angels of peace.
הַחַמָּה מֵרֹאשׁ הָאִילָנוֹת נִסְתַּלְּקָה.
בֹּֽאוּ וּנְלַוֶּה אֶת־שַׁבָּת הַמַּלְכָּה.
צֵאתֵךְ לְשָׁלוֹם הַקְּדוֹשָׁה הַזַּכָּה.
דְעִי שֵֽׁשֶׁת יָמִים אֶל־שׁוּבֵךְ נְחַכֶּה:
כֵּן לַשַּׁבָּת הַבָּאָה.
כֵּן לַשַּׁבָּת הַבָּאָה.
צֵאתְכֶם לְשָׁלוֹם מַלְאֲכֵי הַשָׁלוֹם:
The sun in the treetops no longer is seen,
Come forth and let us speed Sabbath the Queen.
Go forth in peace, holy and pure,
Know that for six days we await you, secure
Until the coming Sabbath,
Until the coming Sabbath,
Go forth in peace, ye angels of peace.

This translation of Ḥayyim Naḥman Bialik’s “Shabbat ha-Malkah” by Israel Meir Lask can be found on pages 280-281 in the Sabbath Prayer Book (Jewish Reconstructionist Foundation, 1945) where it appears as “Greeting to Queen Sabbath.” The poem is based on the shabbat song, “Shalom Alekhem,” and first published in the poetry collection, Hazamir, in 1903. I have made a faithful transcription of the Hebrew and its English translation as it appears in the Sabbath Prayer Book.

The first stanza of Lask’s translation was adapted from an earlier translation made by Angie Irma Cohon and published in 1920 in Song and Praise for Sabbath Eve (1920), p. 87. Cohon’s translation of Bialik’s second stanza of “Shabbat ha-Malkah” does not appear to have been adapted by Lask. (Thank you to Dr. Noam Sienna for informing us of Angie Irma Cohon’s translation.) –Aharon N. Varady

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