tagged: הנותן תשועה haNotén Teshuah

 

הַנּוֹתֵן תְּשׁוּעָה | Prayer for the Royal Family of Queen Elizabeth II (1962)

The text of the prayer, haNoten Teshuah, as adapted for Queen Elizabeth II. . . .

הַנּוֹתֵן תְּשׁוּעָה | Prayer for the Government on Thanksgiving Day, offered by Rabbi David de Sola Pool (1945)

The Prayer for the Government offered by Rabbi David de Sola Pool in his service for Thanksgiving Day in 1945. . . .

הַנּוֹתֵן תְּשׁוּעָה | A Prayer for the Welfare of the Government of Franklin D. Roosevelt during WWII (from A Naye Shas Tkhine Rav Pninim, ca. 1942)

A prayer for the welfare of the government in Yiddish from A Naye Shas Tkhine Rav Pninim (after 1933). . . .

הַנּוֹתֵן תְּשׁוּעָה | Prayer for the Royal Family of King George VI (1942)

The text of the prayer, haNoten Teshuah, as adapted for King George VI. . . .

הַנּוֹתֵן תְּשׁוּעָה | Prayer for the Royal Family of King George V (1931)

The text of the prayer, haNoten Teshuah, as adapted for King George VI. . . .

Az uralkodóház és a hazáért | Prayer for the King [Franz Joseph I] and the [Hungarian] Homeland, by Rabbi Gyula Fischer (1908)

Modeled after the prayer Hanoten T’shuah, this patriotic paraliturgical prayer for the Kingdom of Hungary by Rabbi Gyula Fischer was published in the prayerbook for Jewish women, Rachel: imák zsidó nők számára (1908). . . .

הַנּוֹתֵן תְּשׁוּעָה | Prayer for the Royal Family of King Edward VII (1904)

The text of the prayer, haNoten Teshuah, as adapted for Edward VII. . . .

Rugăcĭune Pentru Regele | Prayer for the King [Carol I, of Romania], by Ḥakham Dr. Moses Gaster (1883)

A variation of the prayer Hanoten Teshua by Ḥakham Dr. Moses Gaster, from his סדור תפלת ישראל: Carte de rugăciuni pentru Israeliţi (Bucureşti, Editor L. Steinberg Stampfel, Eder & Comp. Pressburg 1883), p.192. . . .

הַנּוֹתֵן תְּשׁוּעָה | Prayer for the Royal Family of Queen Victoria (1864)

The text of the prayer, haNoten Teshuah, as adapted for Queen Victoria. . . .

הַנּוֹתֵן תְּשׁוּעָה | Prayer for the Royal Family of King George III (1810)

The prayer, haNoten Teshu’a, as adapted for King George III in 1810. . . .

הַנּוֹתֵן תְּשׁוּעָה | Prayer for the Government of the United States of America, presented by Gershom Seixas on Thanksgiving Day 1789

The prayer for the government presented by Gershom Seixas at K.K. Shearith Israel on Thanksgiving Day 1789. . . .

הַנּוֹתֵן תְּשׁוּעָה | Prayer for King George III (1766)

The prayer for King George III in the English colonies before the Revolutionary War. . . .

הַנּוֹתֵן תְּשׁוּעָה | Prayer for the Prosperity of his Royal Majesty, delivered by Rabbi Jacob Jehudah Leon Templo to King Charles II (1675)

Rabbi Jacob Judah Leon’s Prayer for King Charles II, from his 1675 booklet, was the first Jewish prayer in English for an English king (Mocatta Library, University College London). . . .

הַנּוֹתֵן תְּשׁוּעָה | The Prayer for the Safety of Kings, Princes and Commonwealths, presented by Menasseh ben Israel to Oliver Cromwell (1655)

From “How Faithful The Nation of the Iewes are.” in To His Highnesse The Lord Protector Of The Common-Wealth Of England, Scotland, And Ireland, The Humble Addresses Of Menasseh Ben Israel (1655), p.11-13 (p.91-93 in L. Wolf’s edition). The Hebrew liturgy shown was transcribed from the “Prayer for the Dutch royal family and the city council of Amsterdam” (1950) and has been edited to fit this earlier version of the text. What is clear in comparing this version with the version that became prominent in England and elsewhere, is the removal of the angelo-astrological phrase on the rise of the planetary star corresponding to the particular Sar in heaven and lord on earth. What changed between 1655 and the 18th century? Increased anxiety over exoteric references in the kabbalah following the messianic movement of Shabbetai Tsvi, and also, the Enlightenment. We’ll be keen to find other examples of Hanoten Teshua from before and after 1655, that might add additional light on how this prayer may have changed. Related to the liturgical phrase on the rise of the planetary star, Menasseh ben Israel includes a reference in his argument to Cromwell for the proper regard that should be granted the Jews by the other nations. The reference is to Zohar Pekudei (Zohar II 267b:8-10) and we believe this may be the first time anyone has ever located the actual text being referred to here. . . .