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Shlomo ibn Gabirol

Solomon ibn Gabirol (also Solomon ben Judah; Hebrew: שלמה בן יהודה אבן גבירול‎ Shlomo ben Yehuda ibn Gabirol, Arabic: أبو أيوب سليمان بن يحيى بن جبيرول‎ Abu Ayyub Sulayman bin Yahya bin Jabirul, Latin: Avicebron or Avencebrol) was an 11th-century Andalusian poet and Jewish philosopher. He published over a hundred poems, as well as works of biblical exegesis, philosophy, ethics, and satire.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Solomon_ibn_Gabirol

אֲדוֹן עוֹלָם | Adon Olam: A Mystical Interpretation, by Rabbi Dr. Laura Duhan Kaplan (2018)

Contributed on: 29 May 2023 by Laura Duhan-Kaplan | Shlomo ibn Gabirol |

“Adon Olam: A Mystical Interpretation” by Laura Duhan Kaplan, was created for a music and spoken word performance at Limmud Vancouver, 2018. It was first published in The Infinity Inside: Jewish Spiritual Practice Through A Multi-Faith Lens (Boulder: Albion Andalus, 2019). This is the full original version. A much abridged version (edited by Rabbi Rachel Barenblat) appears in Renew Our Hearts: A Siddur for Shabbat Day (Bayit Ben Yehuda Press, 2023). . . .


אֲדוֹן עוֹלָם (אשכנז)‏ | 世界的主 | Adon Olam (Shìjiè de zhǔ) — Chinese translation by Richard Collis (2022)

Contributed on: 24 Jun 2023 by Aharon N. Varady (editing/transcription) | Richard Collis (translation) | Shlomo ibn Gabirol |

This Chinese translation of an Ashkenazi nusaḥ for the piyyut “Adon Olam,” is found on page 73 of the liner notes for the Chinese edition of Richard Collis’s album We Sing We Stay Together: Shabbat Morning Service Prayers (Wǒmen gēchàng, wǒmen xiāngjù — Ānxírì chén dǎo qídǎo). . . .


אֲדוֹן עוֹלָם (מנהג הספרדים)‏ | Adōn Olam (Italian translation by Rabbi Dr. David Prato, 1949)

Contributed on: 13 Aug 2023 by Aharon N. Varady (editing/transcription) | David Prato (translation) | Shlomo ibn Gabirol |

This is Rabbi Dr. David Prato’s Italian translation of Adon Olam from his bilingual Hebrew-Italian everyday siddur, Tefilah l’David: Preghiere di Rito Italiano (1949), p. 272-275. . . .


אֲדוֹן עוֹלָם (מנהג הספרדים במזרח) | Adōn Olam (Ladino translation from the Sidur Tefilat Kol Pe, 1891)

Contributed on: 17 Aug 2023 by Aharon N. Varady (editing/transcription) | Isaac Gantwerk Mayer (transcription & naqdanut) | Unknown Translator(s) | Shlomo ibn Gabirol |

The Seder Tefilat Kol Peh was printed in 1891 in Vienna, and features a full Ladino translation of the entire siddur. The Ladino translation here is found on the left side of pagespread №145. Along with a full transcription of the Ladino text, Isaac Gantwerk Mayer has also prepared a full romanization of the Ladino. . . .


אֲדוֹן עוֹלָם (מנהג הספרדים)‏ | Adōn Olam (Portuguese translation by Artur Carlos de Barros Basto, 1939)

Contributed on: 13 Aug 2023 by Aharon N. Varady (editing/transcription) | Artur Carlos de Barros Basto | Shlomo ibn Gabirol |

This is Artur Carlos de Barros Bastos’s Portuguese translation of Adon Olam from his prayer-pamphlet, Oração Matinal de Shabbath (1939), p. 52-53. I have set the translation side-by-side with the Hebrew text from which it was derived. . . .


אֲדוֹן עוֹלָם (מנהג הספרדים)‏ | Adōn Olam (rhyming translation by David de Aaron de Sola, 1836)

Contributed on: 11 Jun 2023 by Aharon N. Varady (editing/transcription) | David de Aaron de Sola (translation) | Shlomo ibn Gabirol |

Adon Olam is a piyyut that became popular in the 15th century and is often attributed to Solomon ibn Gabirol (1021–1058) and less often to Sherira Gaon (900-1001), or his son, Hai ben Sherira Gaon (939-1038). The variation of the piyyut appearing here is the 12 line version familiar to Sepharadi congregations. (There are also fifteen and sixteen line variants found in Sepharadi siddurim. The Ashkenazi version has ten lines.) The rhyming translation here by David de Aaron de Sola was transcribed from his prayerbook Seder haTefilot vol. 1 (1836), p. 122. . . .


אֲדוֹן עוֹלָם (אשכנז)‏ | Adon Olam (rhyming translation by George Borrow, 1842)

Contributed on: 11 Jun 2023 by Aharon N. Varady (editing/transcription) | George Borrow | Shlomo ibn Gabirol |

Adon Olam is a piyyut that became popular in the 15th century and is often attributed to Solomon ibn Gabirol (1021–1058) and less often to Sherira Gaon (900-1001), or his son, Hai ben Sherira Gaon (939-1038). The variation of the piyyut appearing here is the 10 line version familiar to Ashkenazi congregations. (There are also twelve, fifteen, and sixteen line variants found in Sepharadi siddurim.) The rhyming translation here by George Borrow was shared in his tales in The Bible in Spain (1843), p. 222. (The text in the 1913 edition on page 546 is a bit easier to read.) . . .


אֲדוֹן עוֹלָם (אשכנז)‏ | Adon Olam (rhyming translation by Israel Zangwill, 1901)

Contributed on: 11 Jun 2023 by Aharon N. Varady (editing/transcription) | Israel Zangwill (translation) | Shlomo ibn Gabirol |

Adon Olam is a piyyut that became popular in the 15th century and is often attributed to Solomon ibn Gabirol (1021–1058) and less often to Sherira Gaon (900-1001), or his son, Hai ben Sherira Gaon (939-1038). The variation of the piyyut appearing here is the 10 line version familiar to Ashkenazi congregations. (There are also twelve, fifteen, and sixteen line variants found in Sepharadi siddurim.) The rhyming translation here by Israel Zangwill was transcribed from the Jewish Quarterly Review vol. 13 (January 1901), p. 321. . . .


אֲדוֹן עוֹלָם (מנהג הספרדים)‏ | Adōn Olam (rhyming translation by Jacob Waley, before 1873)

Contributed on: 10 Jun 2023 by Aharon N. Varady (editing/transcription) | Jacob Waley | Shlomo ibn Gabirol |

Adon Olam is a piyyut that became popular in the 15th century and is often attributed to Solomon ibn Gabirol (1021–1058) and less often to Sherira Gaon (900-1001), or his son, Hai ben Sherira Gaon (939-1038). The variation of the piyyut appearing here is the 12 line version familiar to Sepharadi congregations. (There are also fifteen and sixteen line variants found in Sepharadi siddurim. The Ashkenazi version has ten lines.) The rhyming translation here by Jacob Waley was transcribed from the prayerbook of his daughter Julia M. Cohen’s The Children’s Psalm-Book (1907), pp. 298-299. . . .


אֲדוֹן עוֹלָם (אשכנז)‏ | Adōn Olam (rhyming translation by Jessie Ethel Sampter, 1917)

Contributed on: 11 Jun 2023 by Aharon N. Varady (editing/transcription) | Jessie Ethel Sampter | Shlomo ibn Gabirol |

Adon Olam is a piyyut that became popular in the 15th century and is often attributed to Solomon ibn Gabirol (1021–1058) and less often to Sherira Gaon (900-1001), or his son, Hai ben Sherira Gaon (939-1038). The variation of the piyyut appearing here is the 10 line version familiar to Ashkenazi congregations. (There are also twelve, fifteen, and sixteen line variants found in Sepharadi siddurim.) The rhyming translation here by Jessie Ethel Sampter was transcribed from Joseph Friedlander and George Alexander Kohut’s The standard book of Jewish verse (1917), p. 394. . . .


אֲדוֹן עוֹלָם | Adōn Olam, translated by Rabbi Marcus Jastrow after the abridged arrangement of Rabbi Benjamin Szold (1873)

Contributed on: 12 Mar 2021 by Aharon N. Varady (editing/transcription) | Marcus Jastrow | Benjamin Szold | Shlomo ibn Gabirol |

An English translation of an abridged arrangement of the piyyut, Adon Olam. . . .


אֲדוֹן עוֹלָם (אשכנז)‏ | Adōn Olam (Polish translation by Rabbi Dr. Mojżesz Schorr, 1936)

Contributed on: 12 Aug 2023 by Aharon N. Varady (editing/transcription) | Mojżesz Schorr | Shlomo ibn Gabirol |

Rabbi Dr. Mojżesz Schorr’s translation of Adon Olam in Polish was first printed on pages 8-9 of Modlitewnik na wszystkie dni w roku oraz modlitwę za Rzeczpospolitą ułożoną przez prof. Schorra (1936). . . .


אֲדוֹן עוֹלָם (אשכנז)‏ | Adōn Olam (Romanian translation by Rabbi Dr. Moses Gaster, 1883)

Contributed on: 05 Aug 2023 by Aharon N. Varady (editing/transcription) | Moses Gaster | Shlomo ibn Gabirol |

Rabbi Dr. Moses Gaster’s translation of Adon Olam in Romaninan was first printed on pages 3-4 of Siddur Tefilat Yisrael: Carte de Rugăcĭunĭ Pentru Israeliţĭ (1883), his daily Siddur. . . .


אֲדוֹן עוֹלָם (אשכנז)‏ | Adōn Olam, translated by Tsvi Hirsch Filipowski (1862)

Contributed on: 05 Dec 2021 by Aharon N. Varady (editing/transcription) | Tsvi Hirsch Filipowski (translation) | Shlomo ibn Gabirol |

The cosmological piyyut, Adon Olam, in its Ashkenazi variation in Hebrew with an English translation. . . .


אֲדוֹן עוֹלָם (מנהג הספרדים)‏ | Αδὸν Ὀλὰμ | Adōn Olam (Greek translation by Yosef Naḥmuli, 1885)

Contributed on: 06 Aug 2023 by Aharon N. Varady (editing/transcription) | Yosef Naḥmuli | Shlomo ibn Gabirol |

This is Yosef Naḥmuli’s Greek translation of Adon Olam from his bilingual Hebrew-Greek everyday siddur, Καθημεριναι Προσευχαι (Corfu 1885), p. 6-9. . . .


אֲדוֹן עוֹלָם (אשכנז)‏ | Adōn Olam, translated from Rabbi David Einhorn’s Olat Tamid (1858)

Contributed on: 06 Aug 2022 by Aharon N. Varady (editing/transcription) | Joshua Giorgio-Rubin | David Einhorn | Shlomo ibn Gabirol |

The German translation of “Adon Olam” appearing here is as found in Rabbi David Einhorn’s עלת תמיד Gebetbuch für Israelitische Reform-Gemeinden (1858), pp. 1-2. The English translation here, by Joshua Giorgio-Rubin, translating Rabbi David Einhorn, is as found in Rubin’s Olat Hadashah: A Modern Adaptation of David Einhorn’s Olat Tamid for Shabbat Evening (2020), p. 14. . . .


אֲדוֹן עוֹלָם (מנהג הספרדים)‏ | Adōn Olam, translation by Isaac Pinto (1766)

Contributed on: 01 Aug 2023 by Aharon N. Varady (editing/transcription) | Isaac Pinto (translation) | Shlomo ibn Gabirol |

This is Isaac Pinto’s English translation of Adon Olam from Prayers for Shabbath, Rosh-Hashanah, and [Yom] Kippur (1766), p. 29. The translation there appears without the Hebrew. The Hebrew text of the piyyut set side-by-side with the translation was transcribed from Rabbi David de Sola Pool’s Tefilot l’Rosh haShanah (1937). . . .


אֲדוֹן עוֹלָם (מנהג הספרדים)‏ | Adōn Olam, translation by Ḥakham Ishak Nieto (1740)

Contributed on: 01 Aug 2023 by Aharon N. Varady (editing/transcription) | Ishac Nieto | Shlomo ibn Gabirol |

Ḥakham Ishak Nieto’s translation of Adon Olam was first printed on page 197 of Orden de las Oraciones de Ros-ashanah y Kipur (1740), his maḥzor in Spanish translation for Rosh haShanah and Yom Kippur. The Hebrew text of the piyyut set side-by-side with the translation was transcribed from Rabbi David de Sola Pool’s Tefilot l’Rosh haShanah (1937). . . .


בַּחֹֽדֶשׁ הָֽרְבִיעִי | baḤodesh haRevi’i (In the fourth month), a ḳinah for the 17th of Tamuz attributed to Solomon ibn Gabirol (ca. 11th c.)

Contributed on: 27 Jun 2021 by Aharon N. Varady (editing/transcription) | Isaac Leeser (translation) | Unknown Translator(s) | Shlomo ibn Gabirol |

The seliḥah with its English translation as found in Siddur Siftei Tsadiqim (The Form of Prayers) vol. 6: Seder haTefilot laTaaniyot (ed. Isaac Leeser 1838) p.107-109. . . .


📖 כתר מלכות | Kether Malkhuth (Côroa Real) by Sholomo ibn Gabirol (Portuguese translation by A.C. de Barros Basto, 1927)

Contributed on: 23 Jul 2023 by Aharon N. Varady (digital imaging and document preparation) | Artur Carlos de Barros Basto | Shlomo ibn Gabirol |

A Portuguese translation of Solomon ibn Gabirol’s piyyut, Keter Malkhut, prepared by Artur Carlos de Barros Basto in 1927. . . .


כָּל־בְּרוּאֵי | Kol B’ru-ei, a piyyut by Shlomo ibn Gabirol (ca. 11th c.)

Contributed on: 21 Mar 2020 by Adam Zagoria-Moffet (translation) | Shlomo ibn Gabirol |

A piyyut by Shlomo ibn Gabirol included in the arrangement of Baqashot before the morning service in the liturgical custom of Sefaradim. . . .


כָּל־בְּרוּאֵי | Kol B’ru-ei, a piyyut by Shlomo ibn Gabirol (trans. Rabbi David Aaron de Sola, 1857)

Contributed on: 24 Jan 2022 by Aharon N. Varady (editing/transcription) | David de Aaron de Sola (translation) | Shlomo ibn Gabirol |

A piyyut by Shlomo ibn Gabirol included in the arrangement of Baqashot before the morning service in the liturgical custom of Sefaradim translated by Rabbi David Aaron de Sola. . . .


לְשׁוֹנִי כּוֹנַנְתָּ | Leshoni Konanta (My tongue you have fashioned), a reshut attributed to Shlomo ibn Gabirol (ca. 11th c.) translated by Sara Lapidot

Contributed on: 19 Jun 2021 by Sara Lapidot (translation) | Shlomo ibn Gabirol |

The reshut for the prayer for rain and dew on Shemini Atseret and Pesaḥ, in Hebrew with English translation. . . .


שַׁחַר אֲבַקֶּשְׁךָ | Shaḥar Avaqeshkha (At dawn I seek you), a reshut by Shlomo ibn Gabirol (ca. 11th c.) translated by Sara Lapidot

Contributed on: 19 Jun 2021 by Sara Lapidot (translation) | Shlomo ibn Gabirol |

The reshut for praying at dawn, in Hebrew with English translation. . . .


שַׁחַר אֲבַקֶּשְׁךָ | Shaḥar Avaqeshkha (At dawn I seek you), a reshut by Shlomo ibn Gabirol (ca. 11th c.) translated by Nina Salaman (1901)

Contributed on: 21 Sep 2021 by Aharon N. Varady (editing/transcription) | Nina Davis Salaman (translation) | Shlomo ibn Gabirol |

The reshut for praying at dawn, in Hebrew with English translation. . . .


שַׁחַר אֲבַקֶּשְׁךָ | Shaḥar Avaqeshkha (At dawn I seek you), a reshut by Shlomo ibn Gabirol (ca. 11th c.) translated by Rabbi David Aaron de Sola (1857)

Contributed on: 24 Jan 2022 by Aharon N. Varady (editing/transcription) | David de Aaron de Sola (translation) | Shlomo ibn Gabirol |

The reshut for praying at dawn, in Hebrew with English translation. . . .


שָׁלוֹם לְךָ (לְבֶן) דּוֹדִי | Shalom Lekh (l’Ven) Dodi, by Shlomo ibn Gabirol (ca. 11th c.)

Contributed on: 30 Jun 2021 by Honi Sanders (translation) | Shlomo ibn Gabirol |

A piyyut presenting a dialogue between a couple and Hashem. . . .



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