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Unknown Author(s)

Sometimes the best we can do in attributing a historical work is to indicate the period and place it was written, the first prayer book it may have been printed in, or the archival collection in which the manuscript was found. We invite the public to help to attribute all works to their original composers. If you know something not mentioned in the commentary offered, please leave a comment or contact us.

A Delightful Tkhine for a Pregnant Woman to Say (ca. early 17th c.)

Contributed on: 04 Feb 2020 by Aharon N. Varady (transcription) | Unknown Author(s) |

A prayer of a pregnant woman anticipating childbirth. . . .


על הכל יתגדל ויתקדש | An Alternative Mourner’s Ḳaddish, from a prayer offered during the removal of the Torah from the Arōn (Seder Rav Amram Gaon)

Contributed on: 28 Jun 2017 by Oren Steinitz | Unknown Author(s) |

This Kaddish was first published online at Jewish Renewal Chassidus by Gabbai Seth Fishman. Rabbi Oren Steinitz translated the kaddish on the 3rd yahrzeit after Reb Zalman’s passing. . . .


A Prayer for a Pregnant Woman to Say when She Wishes for an Easy Labor (ca. early 17th c.)

Contributed on: 04 Feb 2020 by Aharon N. Varady (transcription) | Unknown Author(s) |

A prayer for a pregnant woman anticipating her childbirth. . . .


A Prayer for a Woman before giving birth, from a Seder Tkhines (ca. 1640-1720)

Contributed on: 04 Feb 2020 by Aharon N. Varady (transcription) | Unknown Author(s) |

A prayer for a pregnant woman anticipating childbirth, from an unidentified volume of the Seder Tkhines (circa 1640-1720). . . .


A Scholar’s Prayer for Intellectual Honesty, adapted from a prayer quoted by Dr. Leslie Weatherhead (1951)

Contributed on: 23 Nov 2020 by Leslie Weatherhead | Unknown Author(s) | Aharon N. Varady (translation) |

A prayer for intellectual honesty before study. . . .


הַנּוֹתֵן תְּשׁוּעָה | Prayer for the Royal Family of King George Ⅲ (1810)

Contributed on: 17 Feb 2016 by Aharon N. Varady (transcription) | Unknown Author(s) |

The prayer, haNoten Teshu’a, as adapted for King George III in 1810. . . .


הַנּוֹתֵן תְּשׁוּעָה | A Prayer for the Welfare of the Government of Franklin D. Roosevelt during WWII (from A Naye Shas Tkhine Rav Pninim, ca. 1942)

Contributed on: 07 Nov 2017 by Aharon N. Varady (transcription) | Unknown Author(s) |

A prayer for the welfare of the government in Yiddish from A Naye Shas Tkhine Rav Pninim (after 1933). . . .


💬 מגילת ניקנור | Megillat Niqanor (Ⅱ Maccabees, chapters 13-15), a reading for the Day of the Elephantarch

Contributed on: 22 Mar 2016 by Aharon N. Varady (transcription) | Unknown Author(s) | Jason of Cyrene |

It is challenging to think of how to mark Nicanor Day, as it remains at a disadvantage, not only on years when it conflicts with Ta’anit Esther but on all years since it has no mitzvot. This is probably the main reason that, unlike Chanukah and Purim, it was lost to Jewish practice for more than a thousand years. Nevertheless, we do have its megillah, which has been translated into Hebrew and English. Perhaps, if we start reading chapters 13-15 of 2 Maccabees, even just to ourselves, on the 13 of Adar, we can begin to resurrect a holiday that was celebrated and instituted by Judah Maccabee and his followers over two millennia ago, and which they envisioned would continue throughout Jewish History. With the return of Jews to Israel and Jewish sovereignty to Jerusalem, I believe it is about time. . . .


תְּחִינָה װען עס ברעכט אױס אַ מַגֵפָה | A Tkhine When an Epidemic Breaks Out (1916)

Contributed on: 31 Mar 2020 by Meena-Lifshe Viswanath (translation) | Zach Golden (translation) | Noam Lerman (translation) | Der Tekhines Proyekt | Unknown Author(s) |

A tkhine in the event of an epidemic. . . .


עמידה | Another version of the Weekday Amidah, by Rabbi Zalman Schachter-Shalomi

Contributed on: 16 Feb 2020 by Aharon N. Varady (transcription) | Zalman Schachter-Shalomi | Unknown Author(s) |

A version of the weekday Amiday by Rabbi Zalman Schachter-Shalomi emphasizing personal prayer, set side-by-side with a Sefaradi text of the Amidah. . . .


עַד אָנָה בִּכְיָּה בְצִיּוֹן | Ad Ana Bikhya b’Tsiyon (How Long Will Crying Be In Zion), a qinah for Tishah b’Av (ca. 7th c.)

Contributed on: 10 Aug 2022 by Isaac Gantwerk Mayer (translation) | Isaac Gantwerk Mayer (transcription & naqdanut) | Unknown Author(s) |

‘Ad Ana Bikhya B’Tsiyon, is one of the oldest qinot of the cycle, dating to the period before rhyme schemes were the norm for Hebrew poetry. It describes the heavenly luminaries themselves as sympathizing with and lamenting for Israel. It goes through the entire zodiac, beginning with Ares and ending with Pisces. It is traditional to stand and recite the last few lines aloud before transitioning into the Ḳedusha d’Sidra. . . .


אַדִּיר בִּמְלוּכָה | Adir Bimlukhah, a Latin translation of the piyyut by Johann Stephan Rittangel (1644)

Contributed on: 20 Mar 2021 by Aharon N. Varady (transcription) | Isaac Gantwerk Mayer (transcription & naqdanut) | Johann Stephan Rittangel (Latin translation) | Unknown Author(s) |

The text of the popular piyyut “Adir Bimlukhah” (a/k/a “Ki lo na’eh”) in Hebrew, with a Latin translation. . . .


אַדִּיר הוּא | Adir Hu, the acrostic piyyut in its Latin translation by Johann Stephan Rittangel (1644)

Contributed on: 20 Mar 2021 by Aharon N. Varady (transcription) | Isaac Gantwerk Mayer (transcription & naqdanut) | Johann Stephan Rittangel (Latin translation) | Unknown Author(s) |

The alphabetic acrostic piyyut, Adir Hu, in its Latin translation by Johann Stephan Rittangel as found in his translation of the Pesaḥ seder haggadah, Liber Rituum Paschalium (1644). . . .


אַדִירְיַרוֹן בַהִירְיַרוֹן | Adiryaron Ḅahiryaron, a litany of angelic names associated with the 42 letter name, recorded in Sefer haPeliah

Contributed on: 03 Mar 2019 by Aharon N. Varady (transcription) | Unknown Author(s) |

A litany of angelic names recorded in Sefer haPeliah whose initial letters spells out the 42 letter divine name as also found (in variation) in Sefer HaQanah. . . .


אַדִירְיַרוֹן בַהִירְיַרוֹן | Adiryaron Ḅahiryaron, a litany of angelic names associated with the 42 letter name, recorded in Sefer haQanah

Contributed on: 05 Mar 2019 by Aharon N. Varady (transcription) | Unknown Author(s) |

A litany of angelic names recorded in Sefer HaQanah, whose initial letters spells out the 42 letter divine name as also found in Sefer haPeliah. . . .


אֲדוֹן הַסְּלִיחוֹת | Adon haSeliḥot, a pizmon for Seliḥot and Yom Kippur with an alphabetic acrostic translation by Rabbi David de Sola Pool (1937)

Contributed on: 12 Mar 2021 by Aharon N. Varady (transcription) | David de Sola Pool | Unknown Author(s) |

An alphabetic acrostic pizmon for seliḥot and Yom Kippur with an alphabetic acrostic English translation. . . .


אֲדוֹן עוֹלָם (מנהג הספרדים)‏ | Adōn Olam, rhyming translation by Rabbi David de Sola Pool (1937)

Contributed on: 22 Nov 2019 by Aharon N. Varady (transcription) | David de Sola Pool | Unknown Author(s) |

A rhyming translation in English to the popular piyyut, Adon Olam. . . .


אֲדוֹן עוֹלָם (מנהג הספרדים במזרח)‏ | Adōn Olam, translation by Annie Kantar

Contributed on: 18 Jun 2021 by Annie Kantar (translation) | Unknown Author(s) |

The piyyut, Adon Olam, in its expanded fifteen line variation, in Hebrew with English translation. . . .


חַד גַּדְיָא | አሐዱ፡ማሕስእ፡ጠሊ (ʾÄḥädu Maḥsəʾ Ṭäli) — a Gəʽəz translation of Ḥad Gadya by Isaac Gantwerk Mayer

Contributed on: 29 Feb 2024 by Isaac Gantwerk Mayer (translation) | Unknown Author(s) |

A Ge’ez translation of the popular Passover seder song, Ḥad Gadya. . . .


בִּרְכָּת אַהֲבַה | 满怀爱意 | Ahavah Rabah (Mǎnhuái ài yì) — Chinese translation by Richard Collis (2022)

Contributed on: 26 Jun 2023 by Aharon N. Varady (transcription) | Richard Collis (translation) | Unknown Author(s) |

This Chinese translation of an Ashkenazi nusaḥ of the Birkat Ahavah (“Ahavah Rabah”) prayer before the Shema in Shaḥarit is found on pages 12 of the liner notes for the Chinese edition of Richard Collis’s album We Sing We Stay Together: Shabbat Morning Service Prayers (Wǒmen gēchàng, wǒmen xiāngjù — Ānxírì chén dǎo qídǎo). . . .


בִּרְכָּת אַהֲבַה | Ahavat Olam, for Shaḥarit, translated by Rabbi Zalman Schachter-Shalomi

Contributed on: 28 Aug 2018 by Zalman Schachter-Shalomi | Unknown Author(s) |

Rabbi Zalman Schachter-Shalomi, z”l, included his translation of “Ahavat Olam” in his Siddur Tehillat Hashem Yidaber Pi (2009). . . .


בִּרְכָּת אַהֲבַה | Ahavat Olam, for Maariv/Arvit, translation by Rabbi Levi Weiman-Kelman & Shaul Vardi

Contributed on: 08 Feb 2020 by Shaul Vardi (translation) | Levi Weiman-Kelman (translation) | Unknown Author(s) |

The second evening blessing before the recitation of the Shema in Hebrew with English translation . . .


אַחֵֽינוּ | Aḥeinu (Our siblings)

Contributed on: 26 Oct 2023 by Aharon N. Varady (transcription) | Anonymous (translation) | Unknown Author(s) |

“Aḥeinu” is the final prayer in a set of supplications recited on Mondays and Thursdays as the Torah scroll is being prepared to be returned to the Aron. The prayer is first found with variations in wording in the surviving manuscripts of the Seder Rav Amram Gaon (ca. 9th c.). . . .


חַד גַּדְיָא | 𐌰𐌹𐌽 𐌲𐌰𐌹𐍄𐌴𐌹𐌽 | Ain Gaitein (ען גּעטיִן) — a Gothic translation of Ḥad Gadya by Isaac Gantwerk Mayer

Contributed on: 20 Dec 2023 by Isaac Gantwerk Mayer (translation) | Unknown Author(s) |

Ḥad Gadya has a place in Seder tables throughout the Jewish world, and in many communities it was read in translation. Probably not this one, but who knows? While there’s no known community of Jews who spoke Gothic or any other East Germanic language, there certainly were Jews who came into contact with it, such as the communities of Crimea (where variants of Gothic continued to be spoken until the 18th century). In any case this translation of Ḥad Gadya follows the grammar of Wulfila’s 4th-century Gothic translations. . . .


אֵשׁ תּוּקַד בְּקִרְבִּי | Aish Tuqad b’Qirbi: A Fire Shall Burn Within Me, translated by Gabriel Seed

Contributed on: 24 Jul 2015 by Gabriel Kretzmer Seed (translation) | Unknown Author(s) |

Aish Tukad is a ḳinah for Tishah b’Av, usually recited towards the conclusion of the set of dirges for the morning service (in Goldshmidt’s numbering, it is number 32 of our 46 Kinot). According to Goldshmidt’s introduction, the structure of this Piyyut is based on a Midrash in Eicha Zuta 19, where Moses’ praises for God and Israel are seen as parallel to Jeremiah’s laments, thus creating the concept of a comparison between the joy of the Exodus and the pain of the Temple’s destruction. . . .


עלי לשבח | Alai l’Shabe’aḥ (It is incumbent upon me), a prayer of praise from the Ma’aseh Merkavah

Contributed on: 07 Feb 2021 by Aharon N. Varady (transcription) | Unknown Author(s) |

An earlier form of the prayer known as Aleinu, as found in the esoteric Jewish literature of the first millennium CE. . . .


עָלֵֽינוּ לְשַׁבֵּֽחַ | Aleinu, translation by Richard Collis (2019)

Contributed on: 23 Aug 2022 by Richard Collis (translation) | Unknown Author(s) |

Richard Collis’s English translation of Aleinu with Al Kein and Al Tira is provided in the liner notes for tracks 61 and 62 of his album We Sing We Stay Together: Shabbat Morning Service Prayers (2019). . . .


אָמַר אוֹיֵב | Amar Oyev (The Enemy Said) — a piyyut for the Seder Meturgeman of the 7th Day of Pesaḥ

Contributed on: 10 Apr 2023 by Isaac Gantwerk Mayer (translation) | Isaac Gantwerk Mayer (transcription & naqdanut) | Unknown Author(s) |

This piyyut, Amar Oyev (The Enemy Said), the sixth in a series of Aramaic piyyutim from the seventh day of Pesaḥ, is meant to be recited as an introduction to the targum of Exodus 15, verse 9. . . .


תפלה לכל תענית צבור ועל כל צרה (שלא תבא על הציבור!) | Amidah for Any Communal Fast and On Account of Troubles (Nusaḥ Italki)

Contributed on: 15 Sep 2022 by Isaac Gantwerk Mayer (transcription & naqdanut) | Isaac Gantwerk Mayer (translation) | Unknown Author(s) |

The Italian rite, unique among Jewish rites, has preserved up until very recently the custom recorded in the Talmud, Masekhet Tagnanith, for communally declared fast days. In this rite, sometimes referred to as the Twenty-Four Blessings, six more blessings are added to the liturgy — the Zikhronot and Shofrot portions more commonly recited on Rosh haShanah, and four different psalms, all interspaced with a poetic litany on behalf of the ancestors’ merit and shofar blasts. It’s a fascinatng service! . . .


עמידה לשחרית שבת (אשכנז) | Amidah for Shabbat Morning — Chinese translation by Richard Collis (2022)

Contributed on: 28 Jun 2023 by Aharon N. Varady (transcription) | Richard Collis (translation) | Unknown Author(s) |

This Chinese translation of the Shaḥarit Amidah for Shabbat is found on pages 20-27 of the liner notes for the Chinese edition of Richard Collis’s album We Sing We Stay Together: Shabbat Morning Service Prayers (Wǒmen gēchàng, wǒmen xiāngjù — Ānxírì chén dǎo qídǎo). . . .


חַד גַּדְיָא | Ān Tiċċen (אָן טִקֵﬞן) — an Old English translation of Ḥad Gadya by Isaac Gantwerk Mayer

Contributed on: 26 Mar 2024 by Isaac Gantwerk Mayer (translation) | Unknown Author(s) |

Ḥad Gadya has a place in Seder tables throughout the Jewish world, and in many communities it was read in translation. Probably not this one though, since the earliest evidence of Jews in England dates back to 1070, by which point Middle English was already on its way to development. . . .


אָנָּא בְּכֹחַ | Ana b’Khoaḥ, a 42 letter name piyyut with a singing translation by Rabbi Zalman Schachter-Shalomi

Contributed on: 15 Oct 2017 by Zalman Schachter-Shalomi | Unknown Author(s) |

The most well-known 42 letter divine name acrostic piyyut. . . .


הכרזת פסח לפי נוסח איטלייני | the Announcement of Pesaḥ on Shabbat haGadol according to the Italian rite

Contributed on: 06 Apr 2024 by Isaac Gantwerk Mayer (transcription & naqdanut) | Isaac Gantwerk Mayer (translation) | Unknown Author(s) |

Jews all over the world announce the new month on the Shabbat before it with a text known as “birkat ha-ḥodesh” or blessing the month. In many rites, such as the Western Sephardic and Moroccan rites, the fast days 17 Tammuz and 10 Tevet are also announced on the Shabbat before them with a text known as “hazkarat tsomot” or announcing fasts. But to my knowledge, only the Italian rite (and possibly the ancient Eretz Yisrael rite from which much of it derives) have a custom of announcing Pesaḥ on the Shabbat before it. This passage, the Announcement of Pesaḥ (Azcaràd Pesah in Italian traditional pronunciation) is recited on the Shabbat before Pesaḥ, commonly known as Shabbat haGadol (Sciabbàd Aggadòl), after the reading from the Torah. Citing the mystical hekhalot literature, it celebrates the sages who established the rules of the calendar. . . .


קמע לשמירה מפני לילית | Apotropaic ward for the protection of pregnant women and infants against Lilith & her minions (CUL MS General 194, Montgomery 1913 Amulet No. 42)

Contributed on: 16 Aug 2020 by Aharon N. Varady (translation) | Aharon N. Varady (transcription) | James Alan Montgomery (translation) | Richard Gottheil (transcription) | Unknown Author(s) |

An apotropaic ward for the protection of women in their pregnancy and of infant children against an attack from Lilith and her minions, containing the story witnessing her oath to the prophet, Eliyahu along with one variation of her many names. . . .


אֲשֶׁר בָּרָא יֵין עָסִיס | Asher Bara Yayin ‘Asis — a Poetic Extension of the Blessing over Wine for the Passover Seder (ca. 9th c.)

Contributed on: 22 Mar 2023 by Isaac Gantwerk Mayer (translation) | Unknown Author(s) |

The following piyyut seems to have been customarily used in some Babylonian communities as an extensive replacement for the “creator of the vine-fruit” opening of the kiddush. Rav Saadia Gaon forbade it for being an alteration of the talmudic formula, but his successor Rav Hai Gaon permitted it for its cherished status. No communities today have preserved a custom of reciting it, but in 1947 Naphtali Wieder (zçl) published a text he found in the Cairo Geniza, which is replicated and translated below. Daniel Goldschmidt (zçl) suggests that it may be in it of itself a compilation of two different rites. The conjunction point is marked below with a black line. . . .


אֲשֶׁר בִּגְלַל אָבוֹת בָּנִים גִּדֵּל | Asher Biglal Avot Banim Gidel — an archaic piyyut on Mosheh’s Death for Simḥat Torah

Contributed on: 12 Oct 2023 by Isaac Gantwerk Mayer (transcription & naqdanut) | Isaac Gantwerk Mayer (translation) | Unknown Author(s) |

This piyyut of unknown authorship is certainly ancient, showing the lack of a rhyme scheme characteristic of the REALLY old piyyutim (see also Aleinu or El Adon). It is still found in some Ashkenazi and Teman maḥzorim, with many different mostly minor variants (which have been combined together somewhat eclectically into one text here). It is presented here along with an English translation attempting to preserve the Hebrew acrostic. Originally it was recited before the Ashrei leading into musaf, but perhaps for those who follow Ashkenazi customs a more appropriate location would be as an introduction to the Yizkor service on Shmini ‘Atzeret — which for those who don’t keep second-day yontef is the same day. It could also be adapted as part of the liturgy for the seventh of Adar, although the final verse (the old Western rite berakha for finishing a full Torah cycle) would have to be elided. . . .


אֲשֶׁר הֵנִיא | Asher Heni, a piyyut recited after the reading of Megillat Esther and its concluding blessing

Contributed on: 23 Feb 2021 by Aharon N. Varady (transcription) | Simeon Singer (translation) | Unknown Author(s) |

An alphabetical acrostic piyyut celebrating the victory of Esther and Mordekhai over the forces of Haman. . . .


אַתָּה־הוּא וְאָז יָשִׁיר (מקוצר)‏ | Atah Hu and a condensed Az Yashir, adapted and translated by Rabbi Zalman Schachter-Shalomi

Contributed on: 04 Aug 2018 by Zalman Schachter-Shalomi | Unknown Author(s) |

Rabbi Zalman Schachter-Shalomi, z”l, included his translation of נחמיה ט׃ו-י (Neḥemyah 9:6-10) in his Siddur Tehillat Hashem Yidaber Pi (2009). . . .


אַצִיתוּ לִי אִילָנַיָּא | Atsitu Li Ilinaya | The Argument of the Trees — a debate-poem for Purim in Aramaic from the Targum Sheni

Contributed on: 07 Mar 2024 by Isaac Gantwerk Mayer (transcription & naqdanut) | Isaac Gantwerk Mayer (translation) | Unknown Author(s) |

This Aramaic poem, written in the early Byzantine era by an unknown author, can be found in its entirety within the Targum Sheni for Esther 7:9. It features an argument between an assortment of trees over which one is required to bear the great dishonor of having to be the one to hold Haman. It’s also chock-full of anti-Christian polemic and references to Toledot Yeshu. . . .


אָב הָרַחֲמִים שׁוֹכֵן מְרוֹמִים | Av haRaḥamim Shokhein Meromim, a prayer for the martyred during the First Crusade & Rhineland massacres

Contributed on: 27 May 2020 by Isaac Gantwerk Mayer (translation) | Unknown Author(s) |

A prayer for those martyred in the First Crusade and Rhineland Massacres, and by extension, all subsequent pogroms up until and including the Holocaust. . . .


אָבִינוּ שֶׁבַּשָּׁמַיִם | Avinu Shebashamayim, an acrostic supplication recited during Seliḥot

Contributed on: 05 Sep 2021 by Ḥayyim Obadyah | Unknown Author(s) |

This prayer appears on page 11-12 of Hayyim Obadya’s Seder Akhilat haSimanim for 5781. It is a variant of the prayer, “Eloheinu Shebashamayim,” a supplication read in the sephardic tradition during seliḥot. This version contains twenty-five lines as found in Sefer Selihot haShalem, Hazon Ovadia, p.48-51/. Other variations have fifty or more lines. . . .


אדיר הוא | Awesome One: an Alphabetical English Interpretation of the piyyut Adir Hu, by Isaac Gantwerk Mayer

Contributed on: 19 Apr 2019 by Isaac Gantwerk Mayer (translation) | Unknown Author(s) |

Adir Hu, a classic Pesaḥ song if ever there was one, is a part of Seder tables all over the planet. Its alphabetical list of God’s attributes, combined with its repeated pleas for a return to Jerusalem, make it a classic, to the point where the traditional German farewell greeting for Passover was not “chag sameach” or “gut yontef” but “bau gut” – build well. This interpretation, while not a direct translation by any means, has the same rhythmic pattern and alphabetical structure, giving a sense of the greatness of God. . . .


אֵין אַדִּיר כַּיְיָ (מִפִּי אֵל)‏ | Ayn Adir kAdonai | לָא קָאדִּר סַוָא אַלְלָה (There is none like Allah), minhag Cairo variation with a Judeo-Arabic translation

Contributed on: 09 Apr 2024 by Aharon N. Varady (translation) | Akiva Sanders (translation) | Isaac Gantwerk Mayer (transcription & naqdanut) | Aharon N. Varady (transcription) | Unknown Translator(s) | Unknown Author(s) |

This is a variation of Mipi El in Hebrew with a Judeo-Arabic translation found in the Seder al-Tawḥid for Rosh Ḥodesh Nissan, compiled by Mosheh Asher ibn Shmuel in 1887 in Alexandria. . . .


אֵין אַדִּיר כַּיְיָ (מִפִּי אֵל)‏ | Ayn Adir kAdonai (Mipi El) :: There is none like YHVH

Contributed on: 02 Dec 2019 by Akiva Sanders (translation) | Aharon N. Varady (transcription) | Unknown Author(s) |

A popular piyyut for Simḥat Torah (4th hakkafah) originally composed as a piyyut for Shavuot and often referred to by its incipit, “Mipi El.” . . .


בָּרְכוּ | Barkhu, translation by Rabbi Levi Weiman-Kelman & Shaul Vardi

Contributed on: 08 Feb 2020 by Shaul Vardi (translation) | Levi Weiman-Kelman (translation) | Unknown Author(s) |

Barkhu, the call to prayer, in Hebrew and English. . . .


בָּרוּךְ שֶׁאָמַר | Barukh She’amar, interpretive translation by Reb Zalman Schachter-Shalomi z”l

Contributed on: 17 Oct 2017 by Aharon N. Varady (transcription) | Zalman Schachter-Shalomi | Unknown Author(s) |

This English translation by Rabbi Zalman Schachter-Shalomi z”l of “Barukh Sh’amar,” was first published in his Siddur Tehillat Hashem Yidaber Pi (2009). Linear associations of this translation according to the nusaḥ ha-ARI z”l by Aharon Varady. . . .


ברוך ה׳ לעולם | Barukh Hashem l’Olam :: Bless Yah Always, translated by Rabbi Zalman Schachter-Shalomi

Contributed on: 03 Aug 2018 by Zalman Schachter-Shalomi | Unknown Author(s) | the Masoretic Text |

In the daily Shaḥarit (morning) psukei dzemirah service, this centos completes the reading of Psalms 145-150 and precedes the reading of Vayivarekh David” (1 Chronicles 29:10-13). Rabbi Zalman Schachter-Shalomi, z”l, included his translation of the linked verse piyyut, “Barukh YHVH (Hashem) L’Olam” in his Siddur Tehillat Hashem Yidaber Pi (2009). . . .


בּױגעזאנג | Baugesang (Building Song): an alphabetical Yiddish adaptation of the piyyut Adir Hu (1769)

Contributed on: 17 Mar 2021 by Isaac Gantwerk Mayer (translation) | Unknown Author(s) |

This Western Yiddish alphabetical adaptation of Adir Hu is first found in the 1769 Selig Haggadah, under the name of “Baugesang” (meaning Building Song). It grew to be a beloved part of the Western Ashkenazi rite, to the point where the traditional German Jewish greeting after the Seder was “Bau gut,” or “build well!” . . .


💬 Βηλ Και Δρακων | בֵּל וְהַתַּנִּין | Bel & the Dragon, according to Theodotion translated and cantillated in Masoretic Hebrew by Isaac Gantwerk Mayer

Contributed on: 16 Jan 2020 by Aharon N. Varady (transcription) | Isaac Gantwerk Mayer (translation) | Theodotion (translation/Greek) | Unknown Author(s) |

The story of Bel and the Dragon according to the text of Theodotion, translated into biblical Hebrew. . . .


Bénissons, a French table song for the Birkat haMazon (ca. 18th c.)

Contributed on: 04 Jun 2021 by Aharon N. Varady (translation) | Joshua de Sola Mendes (transcription) | David Lévi Alvarès | Unknown Author(s) |

Bénissons is the French version of the well-known Bendigamos, a prayer and melody of the Spanish & Portuguese Jewish communities, most probably originating in Bordeaux, France. . . .



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